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The problem with our Media in regards to ISIS

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posted on Jan, 27 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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The media is owned by a few very rich sociopathic, parasitic, mattoids, their efforts are coordinated with other disciplines such as the Politico, Military, banking, industry and on and on... at meetings like Davos and Bilderberg et cetera. Ultimately, the overall goal is energetic food for the Black Majick masters, beyond the veil, interdimentional and malevolent. You provide that emotional food, pain, suffering,FEAR, being manipulated by the very media in its totality that you speak of. You speak as if this was all "on the level". It is not. Isis is a creation of the system to perpetuate, hate, fear, pain, suffering, agony all those low, base levels of frequency that the ultra-terrestrial tip of the pyramid of parasitism find so delicious.




posted on Jan, 27 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: HUMBLEONE

Well I really don't care about ISIS' origins. I am just trying to point out the hypocrisy in America's rhetoric towards ISIS when you can use that SAME rhetoric on an issue MUCH closer and posing a BIGGER threat than ISIS and we get crickets. Look how many responses I've gotten in this thread. Half of them are me and another good portion of them are someone arguing a red herring.



posted on Jan, 27 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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Great thread idea, and I have the answer to you why we don't talk about the cartels. The government does business with them. We let the cartels smuggle drugs into our cities, in exchange the CIA gets their cut and helps with the smuggling. The prison industry gets their cut by throwing people into jail and making money off prison slavery. The justice system gets its cut in all the additional court and lawyer fees from the drug cases. Local businesses get their cut with the drug convictions depressing workers wages. Local politicians get their cut through voter disenfranchisement. Big business gets their cut by making huge sections of the population unable to vote or care about politics.

Not only do all of these groups benefit but the border states get their cut by letting the cartels police the border. It costs more to secure the border than it does to let the cartels do it from their side and smuggle in a few illegals which again lower the cost of labor.

News of the cartels never comes up because they're our business partners and to those in power, business is good.

As an addendum, I like your religious angle here. That's something I'm going to look into. I know that Latin America has a large population of Christians but I never thought about the cartels as religious fanatics. I've always viewed them as religious but not necessarily extremists of their religion in the way that ISIS uses their faith as a motivator for their actions.
edit on 27-1-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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@Krazysh0t

Thanks for this topic. I am fully with you. It's unbelievable how many people fall for the ISIS propaganda, when the real threat is at our doorstep and even within our own industrial, financial society.

I haven't followed the ISIS propaganda too much, but when investigating one can find tons of discrepancies, fiction and lies. You cannot believe anything from the media anymore. Neither are Muslims evil or terrorists per se. The US should clean up their own mess before bringing sh##t into their homelands... because that's what they actually do: with their actions they bring sh##t into their homelands. Self-fabricated sh##t. What's the point? Chaos? Ultimate Chaos in the world? I don't know. Probably a reason they don't care about Mexican drug cartels. They already fulfill part of their plan.


edit on 28-1-2015 by anotherdaytoday because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

It's funny how America is always so worried about problems abroad when it should be looking inwards at the crippling problems tearing it apart. This expands past the cartels and the war on drugs. Things like infrastructure, corruption in politics, corruption in media, all combine to create the perfect storm of ineptitude and the public just buys it right along. Even ATS isn't safe from this.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Well, I don't think that problems at home are a reason to ignore problems overseas. I think that a lot of our policies create more problems than they solve, but that's another issue. When it comes to the cartels there's basically a blackout on information regarding them. They control half of Mexico, they pump weapons/drugs/people into the US, they're better armed and better funded than many governments, and they are hostile. It's something we need to deal with and something that needs to be in the news constantly. Considering just how highly placed the cartels are in the Mexican government though I honestly believe we're ignoring them in the US now out of fear. Any US politician that talks tough on the cartels knows they'll probably wind up dead, and we already know that our justice system can be bought.

As far as infrastructure goes, that's because the US populace is very irresponsible in what we want our government to do. Just read some of the threads here, we have people that advocate for no public services at all, not even roads. And of course no taxes taken for the upkeep of anything. A nation is defined by it's infrastructure and we have a segment of the population, who makes up a large voice in one of our two major parties that honestly wants our infrastructure to revert to that of a third world nation.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Yes, we can take care of both at the same time. But the way I see it, if a threat that is much closer to home is ok to ignore, then it should be more than ok to ignore the threat from half-way around the world.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Aazadan

Yes, we can take care of both at the same time. But the way I see it, if a threat that is much closer to home is ok to ignore, then it should be more than ok to ignore the threat from half-way around the world.


Again it comes down to the various financial interests. Lots of groups in the US from the feds with border patrol, to the CIA with black money, to the prisons, to business labor costs are coming out ahead due to what the cartels are doing. No one wants to rock that boat. It's wrong, it's corrupt, and it's cowardly but that's the quality of our political candidates.

Our system isn't failing because of a low information electorate, it's failing because we stopped having capable people run for office. Again, we have one party that runs on a platform of making government as inept as possible and we have another party that runs on a platform of kicking the can down the road. How is either of those reasonable?



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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If it snowed in the Middle East, American MSM would be all over that ISIS #



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 06:46 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Very well said. The lesser of two evils paradigm needs to go!



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Aazadan

Very well said. The lesser of two evils paradigm needs to go!


I think we all agree on that, but I also think such an answer is the easy way out. We all agree that it's bad to be bitten by a rattlesnake too. Now lets get into the details of how to prevent that.

I can say what I do, after the 2014 election where I did not vote (for the first time since I was able to in 2000) I decided to get involved with third parties. I researched around and found one that mostly followed my beliefs, on many issues I follow the hacker ethic and as such the pirate party appealed to me. So I started getting involved with them. Maybe come 2016 I can get a candidate elected... the party did gain a few local offices in this past election. I won't get someone elected nationally, but all politics begin at the local stage. Come 2026 with some success maybe we could have a state representative or two.

The point is, if you want to see change take action on your own and help to make it happen. Don't just say something needs to be done. If saying something made it happen we would all be living in a utopia right now.

Following this line of thinking, a large part of my argument is that I believe we have a very poor choice for political candidates these days. By working with a party I can help to increase the quality of local representation by contributing to their grooming/selection, I think I could do a good job too one day, perhaps after I accomplish the other things I would like to do in my life I'll turn my focus to that.



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I'm with you. I came to be a Libertarian for many of the same reasons you joined your political party. Though I more identify with classic Libertarianism than the neo-Libertarianism that has arisen thanks to the Tea Party.

My big issue is marijuana and the war on drugs. Something I see tearing our country apart (as you probably picked up from reading this thread). So all my efforts to enact change are worked through getting marijuana legalized across the country, followed by all drugs. THEN followed by ALL non-violent crimes (prostitution and gambling). The way I see things, making it so those things aren't illegal will put an end to an ENORMOUS strain on our police system, government coffers, and public approval of government. I see it that, contempt for our government largely grew out of the escalation of force from the war on drugs.
edit on 30-1-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



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