It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Duke reverses decision allowing Muslim call to prayer from campus chapel

page: 2
7
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 07:44 AM
link   
Oops.


edit on 1/17/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 07:46 AM
link   
a reply to: FlyersFan

Right. Methodist affiliation. If you want to get technical about it, it was never a Methodist-only school. it was founded BY Methodists and Quakers for ALL and kept going for ALL through a Methodist money connection, money of which the majority chunk was made in the TOBACCO industry by people who happened to BE Methodist and who agreed to fund the school for ALL by making a deal to get free education for Methodist preachers in return for financial support.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 07:47 AM
link   
you can bet if there was a mosque on campus, the muslims wouldn't want or let Christians ring the bells for church services from there now would they.

the church is a Christian place of worship, built for and by Christians to worship a Christian God. let the muslims build their mosque an play their call to prayer there.
edit on 17-1-2015 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 07:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
you can bet if there was a mosque on campus, the muslims wouldn't want or let Christians ring the bells for church services from there now would they.

the church is a Christian place of worship, built for and by Christians to worship a Christian God. let the muslims build their mosque an play their call to prayer there.


Ah well I dunno. The Iman there seems to be a huggy type.

Frankly, if some rich Muslim were to be willing to donate the funds for one, it could still happen. And just think of the outrage that would bring.

And once again, the outreach here went from Christian to Muslim. Not the other way around. But not to worry. [/sarc]The Muslims are back in a room in the basement where they belong.[/sarc]

ETA: Also, are you saying that the thing you find BAD about a place like Saudi Arabia, where, yes, they probably wouldn't allow Christians to use a mosque for worship, you also want to be BAD about the U.S.? Am I getting that right?
edit on 1/17/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 07:58 AM
link   

originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
you can bet if there was a mosque on campus, the muslims wouldn't want or let Christians ring the bells for church services from there now would they.

the church is a Christian place of worship, built for and by Christians to worship a Christian God. let the muslims build their mosque an play their call to prayer there.

I was just going to say about the same thing.

I don't have a problem with this, but I think it would be a cold day in.....when you hear Christian bells at a Mosque ANYWHERE.
All this inclusiveness is HIGHLY one sided.

Even the Pope, regardless what I think of him, has had all inclusive services at the Vatican.
I don't think we will see Christians invited to Mecca anytime soon.
edit on 1 17 2015 by stosh64 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 08:03 AM
link   

originally posted by: WilsonWilson
Are religious run universities common in America?


most of the oldest

answersingenesis.org...

Many of America’s and England’s oldest universities were established as religious institutions, but now they advocate evolutionary thinking. What happened?

The Radcliffe Camera at Oxford University, built between 1737–1749, was originally used to house the Radcliffe Science Library.
Most of the colleges in the United States that started over 300 years ago were Bible-proclaiming schools originally. Harvard and Yale (originally Puritan) and Princeton (originally Presbyterian) once had rich Christian histories.

Harvard was named after a Christian minister. Yale was started by clergymen, and Princeton’s first year of class was taught by Reverend Jonathan Dickinson. Princeton’s crest still says “Dei sub numine viget,” which is Latin for “Under God she flourishes.”

In the United Kingdom, the earliest university-type establishment was probably the College, established by the Celtic preacher St. Illtyd in about AD 500. Oxford University was established by various religious orders. Likewise, Cambridge University was established in 1209 by Christian leaders. Saint Andrews, Scotland’s oldest university, was founded principally for the teaching and study of theology. The commitment of these religious founders might be suspect, but many of the later colleges were founded by Bible-believing Christians. The University of Edinburgh had a thoroughly evangelical beginning, being founded under Presbyterian auspices.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 08:10 AM
link   
It is my understanding that the chapel is available and open to people of all faiths.

chapel.duke.edu...

Bl ues Devils Advocate

First, the question on the table—how to give Muslims a fair and open place to worship on campus—isn’t binary. Muslim students and teachers have been holding services in the chapel for years. As attendance increased, the location moved from smaller rooms to bigger ones. The latest decision, to move the call to prayer from the chapel’s basement to its tower, was a big leap. It didn’t have to be that big. Nor were the other details of the original plan essential. The plan was to allot three minutes for the call, including an Arabic chant and an English translation, with “moderate” amplification. The problem, apparently, was the use of the tower, which made some non-Muslims feel threatened.

Feel threatened if you care to. Feel free to promote and continue directed hatred and suspicion at all Muslims if you care to. Amd read more at Slate if you care to.

Duke didn't have a problem with it. Students there don't have a problem with it.

Let’s be clear: Much of the sentiment behind the Duke backlash is tribal, xenophobic, and stupid. Franklin Graham, the bigoted son of evangelist Billy Graham, stirred things up by accusing Duke of “promoting” Islam while “followers of Islam are raping, butchering, and beheading” unbelievers. Another Islamophobe suggested Duke was trying “to favor religions seemingly at war with Western civilization.” These statements, by conflating Islam with terrorism, lie and foment prejudice.

I agree.
edit on 1/17/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 08:36 AM
link   
Muslims are famous for converting the religious places of others into mosques when they move into an area and take over as part of their conquering process. See what happened to the Hagia Sophia for one famous example.

Now, if Duke wants to air a call to prayer, I am not against that, especially if they still air bells from the chapel.

However, it is going a step too far IMO to use a Christian chapel tower for that broadcast. It sends the wrong message in this day of radicalization. If the Muslim students want have a call to prayer broadcast, let them fund a proper minaret for it.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 09:37 AM
link   
a reply to: ~Lucidity

Personally I don't think the Call to Prayer should be coming from a Chapel...

That seems abit intrusive.



At the same time making a big deal out of it is pathetic.

He basically lumped all Muslims into the "beheaders" market!
& that's just shameful!



Wonder why he didn't talk about Anti-Balaka Christians murdering Muslim children in Africa?
Wonder why nobody talks about that?


Probably because they do not represent Christians!



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 09:39 AM
link   
a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

Likely because nobody in general talks much about Africa. It's a mess.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 09:54 AM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

They do when its Boko Haram...

And in all fairness, I've heard many people call the Middle East a mess.



Anywho, a Call to Prayer from a Chapel, while a minor detail, still seems intrusive to me!

But I do highly respect the man who thought up the idea as a goal towards integration and peaceful existence...

Shame that's been overlooked by Zealots who focus more on Muslims in the Middle East than they do with fellow Countrymen.
edit on 17-1-2015 by CharlieSpeirs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 09:55 AM
link   

originally posted by: WilsonWilson
Are religious run universities common in America?


The majority of Universities (at least the old ones) in Europe were started out as religious institutions too. How that affects current administration is variable from a lot, like Notre Dame, to not much at all, like Georgetown.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 10:03 AM
link   

originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
a reply to: ~Lucidity

Personally I don't think the Call to Prayer should be coming from a Chapel...

That seems abit intrusive.



At the same time making a big deal out of it is pathetic.

He basically lumped all Muslims into the "beheaders" market!
& that's just shameful!



Wonder why he didn't talk about Anti-Balaka Christians murdering Muslim children in Africa?
Wonder why nobody talks about that?


Probably because they do not represent Christians!




You mean this Seleka? The Islamic terrorists that slaughtered women and children and took over the country by coup?

"They started to attack my son. They tried to shoot him but the gun was not working. So they slit his throat instead. What threat does this child pose to the Seleka? He is just a child. My heart is right here: if Michel Djotodia was here, my heart would destroy him."

More than 30 people have been killed in the village of around 5,000, situated near a gold mine about 30 miles from Bossangoa, Romeo estimates. "I went to the field where my wife was and found a boa constrictor eating a baby because its mother had been killed. Then I saw a woman shot in the leg with a child whose intestines were falling out."

Yes. The Christians fought back and retaliated.

Islamic Seleka Unspeakable Horrors

This what people refer to when they say Muslims around the world are the problem. And you try to create a false equivalency when they are attacked and driven back?

Why don't you share the back story of Seleka?



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 10:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Jamie1

You love the term false equivalency & yet you continue to use it incorrectly!



Your own source proves exactly what I said...

Christians taking up arms in vigilante militias known as "anti-balaka" — meaning anti-sword or anti-machete — and committing atrocities of their own





& everyone knows about Seleka... Which again proves my point that when its Muslims it's mainstream news!



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 10:34 AM
link   
a reply to: ~Lucidity

Hell no! Why give them an additional reason to congregate and recruit more radical thinking Muslims! Would it be right if Christians went to a Muslim mosque and ask them to ring their church bells on Sunday? This expectation that Christians have to accept and respect a religion who are engaged in killing innocent people and trying to force their beliefs and ways onto non-Muslims is outrageous! I don't even like Jehovah Witnesses coming to my door and trying to preach to me their beliefs!



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 10:46 AM
link   
a reply to: WeRpeons

There was no "force" or "expectation"...

It was a Christian who put forth the idea.



I don't even agree with it!
edit on 17-1-2015 by CharlieSpeirs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 10:54 AM
link   
Christian Bells on Sunday, Muslim call to worship on Friday.
It's really not that big a deal. If it were left up to me, would I permit it? Probably. And I affiliate with the Methodist denomination.

But I have a "but".

Remember the group of Muslim men (I think about six of them) were on a plane in the U.S. not too long after 9-11, and they were dressed Arabic, appeared Arabic, speaking in Arabic, and began all praying together, loudly, in Arabic. Nobody else on the plane understood what they were saying. It scared the hell out of everybody on the plane. The act was physically harmless, but emotionally - not.

Then the idea to build a mosque in Manhattan on Ground Zero. Harmless Physically, I guess, but again emotionally, not harmless.

And the call to prayers on Friday is harmless.

But the things I've listed, the gentlemen on the plane, the Mosque at Ground Zero, the calling of prayers, are all probably harmless in the long run, but indeed are invasive psychologically, and otherwise simply Rude.

Considering everything that is going on globally right now, it seems a bit passive-aggressive as well.
edit on 1/17/2015 by ladyinwaiting because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 11:08 AM
link   
a reply to: ~Lucidity

I just have to ask a simple question.

Why is it so many in the west, the most prosperous civilization in history mind you, want to add aspects from obviously failed cultures, that fail specifically because of the aspects being pushed?

Islam is what makes the middle east the biggest crap hole on earth.

Why are some of you so intent on bringing it here?



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 11:17 AM
link   
a reply to: tothetenthpower

The west is more than north america, you realize that right?

I dont recall learning about native americans being killed in Europe.

The Europeans exported their civilization to north america.

The entirety of islamic civilization is a steeming pile of camel dung.

Why do you encourage bringing it here?

If they want to move to the west and prosper, they need to learn our ways, and leave theirs at home.

They can keep their religion, but we get to keep our ways.

You know the ones that created and make modern life possible.

The only thing islam has given the world is since thousands of years ago is problems.



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 11:20 AM
link   
a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

My intent was not to lie. I must of missed that point in the OP, I stand corrected. But still, for anyone even to suggest such a thing is absolutely ridiculous.




top topics



 
7
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join