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Denmark claims gigantic piece of the Arctic, incl. North Pole

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posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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Sure, why not ?

Denmark claims gigantic piece of the Arctic

Denmark claims ownership of huge piece of seabed under the North Pole - all the way up to the Russian border.

Google Translate :



Denmark will Monday afternoon become the first country in the world that requires full ownership of the North Pole. The move is part of a huge country claim the Arctic seabed, which according to Denmark is an extension of Greenland.

The requirement for the 895,000 square kilometers of seabed - more than 20 times the size of Denmark - means that Denmark will pull the outer limit of the Kingdom across the Arctic Sea and completely to Russia's 200-mile limit.

This takes Denmark emulation with Russia and Canada, which also marked a desire to own the symbolic point 4,300 feet below the arctic ocean, into a new phase. Both major countries have made it a political project.


Google Translate

Watch out for Russians holding a referendum under the seals and polar bears to annex it.




posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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Is that new position by Denmark related in any way to the metal utensils recently found up that way? Maybe to claim that they were there first?
edit on 14-12-2014 by Aliensun because: word correction



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: Aliensun

It`s about a deep sea-ridge which has connections to Greenland.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:18 PM
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Ownership of the area is purely symbolic, there is nothing to gain resource wise as it's a very hostile environment, the expense would kill the income.

It's in the right of Denmark to claim it like others do, though it's just going to be a long long discussion from country's trying to claim the area and pretty pointless IMO.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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That seabed is as Canadian as bacon.....let the Danish navy come and try to take it.....



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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Are there any Eskimos living there? If so, I wonder how they feel about it.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark
I don't think any Inuit live under water.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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Theres a whole country of them called Nunavit....capital called Iqaluit.....nice SAC base there....3rd longest runway in North America....



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: stirling
You'll have to tear it from theRussians first!!

Earlier this year they put the Russian flag on the North Pole.

So you Canadians have got competition. Expect more of it due to the bad relations with the "west".



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: ispyed


Earlier this year they put the Russian flag on the North Pole.
I don't see a flag. But I don't think a few teenagers really count as a territorial claim.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Oops. I just re-read it after you said that. I saw "Arctic" and thought, well landmass. Good call lol.



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 01:32 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Aliensun

It`s about a deep sea-ridge which has connections to Greenland.


Didn't Greenland change their relationship with Denmark, moving into a commonwealth setup like the UK? If so how can the Netherlands make a claim based on Greenland's territory?



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 01:34 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

WTF are you talking about ?



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 01:37 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Xcathdra

WTF are you talking about ?


What part of my question tripped you up?

Greenland was part of Denmark. I thought Greenland and Denmark changed their relationship allowing Greenland autonomy.

My question was based on your comment about Greenland.



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

The part of a connection with the Netherlands...?



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: BornAgainAlien

Predictable claim, in just under deadline.


Territorial claims in the Arctic

Under international law, international waters including the North Pole and the region of the Arctic Ocean surrounding it, is not owned by any country. The five surrounding Arctic countries are limited to an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of 200 nautical miles (370 km; 230 mi) adjacent to their coasts. The waters beyond the territorial waters of the coastal states are considered the "high seas" (i.e. international waters). The sea bottom beyond the exclusive economic zones and confirmed extended continental shelf claims are considered to be the "heritage of all mankind" and administered by the UN International Seabed Authority.

Upon ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), a country has a ten-year period to make claims to an extended continental shelf which, if validated, gives it exclusive rights to resources on or below the seabed of that extended shelf area.[1] Norway (ratified the convention in 1996[2]), Russia (ratified in 1997[2]), Canada (ratified in 2003[2]) and Denmark (ratified in 2004[2]) launched projects to provide a basis for seabed claims on extended continental shelves beyond their exclusive economic zones. The United States has signed, but not yet ratified the UNCLOS.[3][4]

The status of certain portions of the Arctic sea region is in dispute for various reasons. Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia and the United States all regard parts of the Arctic seas as "national waters" (territorial waters out to 12 nautical miles (22 km)) or "internal waters". There also are disputes regarding what passages constitute "international seaways" and rights to passage along them (see Northwest Passage).

........Denmark ratified UNCLOS on 16 November 2004 and has through 2014 to file a claim to an extended continental shelf.



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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All of the rest should stay out of my Canadian waters.



posted on Dec, 15 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: stirling

The SAC base closed in 1963. I've landed at the civilian airport that took it over. And I can tell you that while it's a fine runway, it's not anywhere near the second longest in North America. It's 8,605 feet long. Washington Dulles alone has four that are longer. Wilmington Ohio has two longer ones. Denison Tx is longer. Atlanta has 5 longer ones. In fact, Frobisher Bay AFB was closed because the runway was too short for the B-47s and B-52s that SAC had.



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