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The Great Floods, Scientists discover an ocean 400 miles beneath our feet that could fill our oceans

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posted on Nov, 30 2014 @ 11:30 PM
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Many have wondered "where did the water come from" if there were great worldwide floods. It appears the mystery is being solved:

www.extremetech.com...

Hydroplate Theroy:

www.youtube.com...



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posted on Nov, 30 2014 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: infolurker
This was talked about some time ago. There is not an ocean of water, there is a deep layer of hydrated minerals.


The water-rich nature of this inclusion, indicated by infrared absorption, along with the preservation of the ringwoodite, is direct evidence that, at least locally, the transition zone is hydrous, to about 1 weight per cent.

www.nature.com...

So, in each pound of mineral there can be as much as about 4 grams of water. Water which can be extracted, but not water which can flow.



posted on Nov, 30 2014 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

Not really and this was posted back in June.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 30 2014 @ 11:59 PM
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a reply to: Phage Water that can't flow, really? Think on that before you reply, for your sake. With all due respect of course.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: nolongeresisting

Crystalized water deposits.


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posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:07 AM
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a reply to: nolongeresisting
For my sake? Ok.


There, I thought about it. The article is about hydrated minerals, not liquid water. It is now and it is when it was first talked about here.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: nolongeresisting

Ever water your garden?

Wait a while....once the water has seeped into the ground grab a handful of damp dirt.....is that water still currently capable of flowing through it?

No. The ratio of soil to water is too great and instead would start to evaporate over time.

Think on that before you reply, for your sake.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: LightAssassin

"Damp dirt" is called mud. The water, through diffusion and aided by gravity, would indeed flow through the dirt, turning it hence, into said "mud". It would flow downwards.

Think about that.


edit on 12/1/2014 by Turq1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: LightAssassin yeah! what he said!




posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: LightAssassin

Not damp dirt. Not damp anything. Hydrated minerals. H2O chemically bonded to minerals.

edit on 12/1/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)


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posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: Turq1

There's a lot of hilarious mud-slinging going on here.

Think about that.






posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 02:12 AM
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originally posted by: nolongeresisting
a reply to: Phage Water that can't flow, really? Think on that before you reply, for your sake. With all due respect of course.



It's water that's bound up in the chemical structure of a mineral.

There's bound water in concrete, for example. It can't flow either.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 02:14 AM
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Rather than trying to come back with witty and smart responses, let's try to be a mature community and respond with information and evidence supporting each claim. This way random readers of a topic who may be ignorant of either side of the facts (like me), do not have to go through pages of randomness to try to find any factual information.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 03:51 AM
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i said this a while ago.

There are also vast caverns benith our feet in most places.

Say for instance you drill into the rock with a running underground river. It could fill up and lead to a sink hole.

Likewise When it rain a lot these pockets fill up causing destablization.

Most Earthquakes happen around the time there is a big drought or hasn't rained for a while and it starts to rain.
At least that's what i noticed.

So i think the water moving through the Earth has a dirastic effect on subterrainian activity.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 08:33 AM
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I thought there were both crystallized water below and liquid water below in caverns,rivers, etc.....(bear with me I'm on medication right now and probably not saying this technically correct....) So are there both? And if so, ....once the liquid water touches the crystallized water can it change the crystal to liquid water? Causing a sudden flood or swelling of a lot of water from below.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 09:54 AM
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I thought there were both crystallized water below and liquid water below in caverns,rivers

This is about hydrated minerals in the Earth's mantle. Not "crystallized water".



once the liquid water touches the crystallized water can it change the crystal to liquid water?
The only crystallized water I know of is ice. This is not ice. This is hydrated chemicals and no, if liquid water touches it it does not free liquid water.
edit on 12/1/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 10:03 AM
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Mineral hydration


Mineral hydration is an inorganic chemical reaction where water is added to the crystal structure of a mineral, usually creating a new mineral, usually called a hydrate.

In geological terms, the process of mineral hydration is known as retrograde alteration and is a process occurring in retrograde metamorphism. It commonly accompanies metasomatism and is often a feature of wall rock alteration around ore bodies. Hydration of minerals occurs generally in concert with hydrothermal circulation which may be driven by tectonic or igneous activity.

Mineral hydration is also a process in the regolith that results in conversion of silicate minerals into clay minerals.

There are two main ways in which minerals hydrate. One is conversion of an oxide to a double hydroxide, as with the hydration of calcium oxide—CaO—to calcium hydroxide—Ca(OH)2, the other is with the incorporation of water molecules directly into the crystalline structure of a new mineral, as in the hydration of feldspars to clay minerals, garnet to chlorite, or kyanite to muscovite.

Some mineral structures, for example, montmorillonite, are capable of including a variable amount of water without significant change to the mineral structure.

Hydration is the mechanism by which hydraulic binders such as Portland cement develop strength. A hydraulic binder is a material that can set and harden submerged in water by forming insoluble products in a hydration reaction. The term hydraulicity or hydraulic activity is indicative of the chemical affinity of the hydration reaction.[1]


This should help clear up some of the confusion in this thread.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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My point is that the water flowed before, and it is capable of flowing again. The original point made by the OP is where did the water possibly go? correct? I am simply saying just because it's currently trapped, it wasn't. I don't know what type of conditions it would take to release water "trapped' but I'm sure if it were released it would flow. Should I say seep, depending on amount and conditions among other variables. Water flows, fire burns, and I digress; silly @ this point I feel.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: nolongeresisting

I'm going to direct you to a bit from the very bottom of the article:


Finally, here’s a fun thought that should remind us that Earth’s perfect composition and climate is, if you look very closely, rather miraculous. One of the researchers, talking to New Scientist, said that if the water wasn’t stored underground, “it would be on the surface of the Earth, and mountaintops would be the only land poking out.” Maybe if the formation of Earth had be a little different, or if we were marginally closer to the Sun, or if a random asteroid didn’t land here billions of years ago… you probably wouldn’t be sitting here surfing the web.


Emphasis mine. The global flood myth, what the OP is trying to say this study helps prove, requires that ALL land, including the highest peeks, be submerged underwater. So even if all the water was on the surface, it STILL doesn't prove the global flood myth.

Genesis 7:19-20 The water prevailed more and more upon the earth, so that all the high mountains everywhere under the heavens were covered. The water prevailed fifteen cubits higher, and the mountains were covered.
edit on 1-12-2014 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: nolongeresisting
a reply to: Phage Water that can't flow, really? Think on that before you reply, for your sake. With all due respect of course.



When you freeze water is it flowing?
Ice cubes are made of water which is no longer flowing.



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