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The Great Floods, Scientists discover an ocean 400 miles beneath our feet that could fill our oceans

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posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t I certainly can't argue with facts nor do I have any desire to do so. Cheers




posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: mortex yes, when it melts. peace



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: Phage




So, in each pound of mineral there can be as much as about 4 grams of water. Water which can be extracted, but not water which can flow.


Thanks for the info, although i would imagine the statement you make about the water not flowing would depend upon certain circumstances.

For example, this topic mentions the great flood, and hypothesises the water may have come from (assuming it wasn't melt water from the last major ice age) this deep hydrated mineral layer.

If, as is being researched around the world, a spectacularly catastrophic series of cometary or meteorite impacts occurred ten to fifteen thousand years ago, it is within the realms of possibility that concurrent with multiple, although relatively small meteorites striking the Earth at once or within a short time, would cause massive disturbances beneath the surface.

Fracturing of bedrock, quakes, eruptions would probably ensue, both on land and under the seas.

This could conceivably vaporise the trapped water and release a percentage of it from the mineral layer to emerge as steam and vapour. This would condense and fall as rain...lots and lots of rain...possibly enough to create massive flooding.

A lot of possibles i know, but after all we can only speculate at this point.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: nolongeresisting



My point is that the water flowed before, and it is capable of flowing again

What makes you think the water "flowed before?" There are hydrated minerals on the surface of the Moon. There are hydrated minerals on asteroids. There is water vapor in space. No indication that water flowed in any of these cases.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 04:18 PM
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Absolutely fascinating story. So if a layer of this sapphire blue gemstone: ringwoodite, exists 400 miles below the surface and exists there only because of pressure, how did it get to the surface as ringwoodite without exploding (I'm talking about the microscopic inclusion in diamond)? The synthetic, made in the lab stuff, gets squeezed between diamonds until it forms and then explodes.

Also, if it "seeps" as a hydroxyl from the ringwoodite, does that imply pressure anomalies? Does the speed with which it gets to the surface then cause it to be somehow stable at what has to be a considerably lower pressure?

Does inclusion within the diamond at formation somehow create the pressure?

Or is it stable, regardless of pressure, once formed? If so, then how would it "seep."? Or is it a hydrogen-rich environment that causes "seepage"?

How long does the ringwoodite that arrives on asteroids last? Is it still ringwoodite after it loses its' water? Or is it olivine?



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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I wouldn't call this so much an ocean under the mantle and would rather correlate it to what a wet sponge does when you squeeze it. If that is true then there would need be an explanation of where the pressure would originate from to squeeze a planet-wide flood out of the inside of the Earth.


originally posted by: infolurker
Many have wondered "where did the water come from" if there were great worldwide floods. It appears the mystery is being solved:

www.extremetech.com...

Hydroplate Theroy:

www.youtube.com...



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: nolongeresisting
My point is that the water flowed before, and it is capable of flowing again. The original point made by the OP is where did the water possibly go?


Step outside, and take a look at the concrete structures around you. Where did the water go? The concrete is full of water. But it's not going to flow. If you break the concrete, it's still in there. It doesn't "seep", it doesn't "leak".

Same for the wallboard in your house. It's gypsum. Same issue. That wallboard has bound water, the same sort of thing with ringwoodite. Does it seep? Leak? Flow? No? No, it doesn't. Because that water is part of the mineral now.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

This OP, in part, is about ringwoodite and about how waves travel through it. Are you saying that the new cements have similar properties? Are you saying that the new cements hold as much water as ringwoodite? That would certainly explain some of the catastrophic failures with them (the new cements/concretes) currently occurring around the world.
edit on 1-12-2014 by luxordelphi because: because I can



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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originally posted by: luxordelphi
Are you saying that the new cements have similar properties? Are you saying that the new cements hold as much water as ringwoodite? That would certainly explain some of the catastrophic failures with them (the new cements/concretes) currently occurring around the world.


If they weren't hydrated, you wouldn't have concrete, you'd have powder with rocks in. And the nature of the hydration is the same as ringwoodite.



posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 04:18 AM
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a reply to: AreUKiddingMe


OMG, that was good!!!!


In all seriousness, what Phage said, to those who don't understand.



posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 04:21 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I know, I was trying to explain in kindergarten terms of how water would stop being capable of flowing through a commonly understood material....just based off their comment of the water.

I read the initial article, still very interesting. I don't think anyone can take this thread seriously now.





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