It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Air tanker down over Yosemite fire

page: 1
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:29 PM
link   
A Cal Fire S2T air tanker fighting the Dog Rock Fire in Yosemite National Park has gone down. Crews are trying to get to the last known position of the aircraft, but one report has been confirmed that it's down, other reports say it's status is unknown at this time. It's believed that the pilot was the only one on board. The fire has so far burned 130 acres, and closed highway 140 into the park.


Authorities were searching for an airtanker last seen flying over a fire near Yosemite National Park after contact was lost with the plane today.

"Emergency personnel are currently responding to the last known location of the aircraft," the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said in a statement. "The airtanker was assigned to the Dog Rock Fire burning near Yosemite's Arch Rock."

The status of the aircraft and the pilot have not been determined, the agency said.

abcnews.go.com...


An airtanker crashed as crews battled a new, rapidly spreading northern California wildfire Tuesday afternoon, and there was no word on the pilot's condition, state fire officials said. All airtankers were grounded immediately after the plane disappeared while flying over the Dog Rock Fire near the Arch Rock in Yosemite National Park, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

The S2 tanker went down disappeared about 4:26 p.m. (7:26 p.m. ET), less than two hours after the fire started. It rapidly grew to 130 acres in just a couple of hours, forcing the evacuation of about 60 homes in the nearby community of Foresta, CalFire said. El Portal Road, also known as State Highway 140, was closed and wasn't expected to reopen any time soon, CalFire said.

www.nbcnews.com...




posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:32 PM
link   
I am sorry to hear this news. Dangerous but important job.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:40 PM
link   
What were they carrying? The first article said the aircraft is capable of holding 1,100 gallons of fire retardant. So is that what was on board?

Even though I'm scared to fly I admit it's much safer than ground travel. I won't let this incident scare me even further.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme

Most likely it was carrying retardant.

Air Tankers are usually older aircraft, that go into places where normal planes don't, suffering stresses that a normal plane will never see.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:48 PM
link   
These airplanes are old and well worn. Sadly, one is lost per fire season. My best guess is it that broke up in flight or flew into the ground.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:49 PM
link   
a reply to: buddah6

I'm betting it came apart in flight.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:20 PM
link   
I'm sure they have to drop fairly close to the ground, which is tough flying for planes that handle like boats.

Damage to any control surface could send a plane into the ground very quickly during maneuvering, without the time that altitude buys you to try to handle the plane.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:34 PM
link   
I Flew PB4Y-2's, P2V-5 &7's, C-130a's, CH-54b's fighting fires as well as a career in the corporate world. It was an S2T modified by Marsh. Quality airframe. CalFire is a quality organization. It is inherently dangerous. I guess I can say I know, I used to fly for H&P. I was just informed of the pilot's identity, but am not willing to share it here. Sorry, too many memories of Hercs breaking up in flight to perpetuate sensationalizing tragedies as this.

Condolences to the family and Godspeed to my brother.

In other related news, An Air Attack went off the runway over the weekend in Grass Valley.
fireaviation.com...

I am happily retired
edit on 7-10-2014 by Idahomie because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2014 by Idahomie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:45 PM
link   
Those guys really put their asses on the line. Any vids I ever watch about fire fighting from the sky always leave me thinking, those fellas are heroes and that's some tight flying.
Hope whomever is involved comes out of this, all my luck points expended on their safe return.
edit on 7-10-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


Air Tankers are usually older aircraft, that go into places where normal planes don't, suffering stresses that a normal plane will never see.


Like this C 130 caught on tape at the moment of highest stress on the wings. Both come off at the root.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:58 PM
link   
Gee thanks for sharing.


Their names were Steve Wass, Craig Le Bare and Mike Davis. I broke bread with these men.

my logbook shows one C-130 Tail #. Guess which one.

I cant figure how to post a picture on here. But I have many of the old crew. I was on it.

a reply to: intrptr


edit on 7-10-2014 by Idahomie because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2014 by Idahomie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 10:09 PM
link   
The aircraft involved was one of 26 bought from the Department of Defense in 1996. They were given upgraded engines after being bought. Almost all of them are currently in use battling various fires.
edit on 10/7/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 10:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Idahomie


my logbook shows one C-130 Tail #. Guess which one.

Sorry for your loss. It wasn't their fault.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 09:24 AM
link   
Those pilots are ballsy. Every time I see these crews on the news, it reminds me of the movie: Always



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 09:40 AM
link   
It's been confirmed that the pilot was killed, although the family asked that his name be kept quiet until all family members can be notified. He was an employee of DynCorp, who is contracted to supply pilots and maintenance to CalAir. The aircraft impacted a canyon wall in the direction that he was attempting to drop retardant. They reported debris almost hit a fire crew nearby, but no one on the ground was injured. One witness said that it banked like it was going to come down and make a drop, and it rolled and impacted the hillside.

The last CalAir tanker crash was in 2001 when two tankers collided. The company had a two seat observation aircraft crash in 2006, killing a battalion chief and pilot.

The rest of the CalAir S-2 fleet has been grounded.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 10:14 AM
link   
It's always sad to hear of a loss like this, condolences to the family.
I have always had the utmost respect for the pilots that fly the tankers, as a guy on the ground with a brush hook, there were a couple of times I was glad as hell to have to hit the ground as a couple of tons of pink snot dropped on us.

I think that most people have no idea of how difficult of a mission these pilots have, older airframes and extremely difficult terrain.

This is a photo of the very canyon this accident happened in. The photo doesn't do the ruggedness of ths terrain justice.




posted on Oct, 9 2014 @ 11:06 AM
link   
Geoffrey "Craig" Hunt was the pilot that was killed in the crash. The remaining 22 Trackers remain grounded.



posted on Oct, 11 2014 @ 11:07 AM
link   
CalFire has reactivated their tankers. The NTSB has determined that it was not a structural failure, or age related problem with the aircraft, and gave the green light to start flying them again.

losangeles.cbslocal.com...



posted on Oct, 11 2014 @ 11:26 AM
link   
Zaph, Was this a CFIT accident? Maybe due to bad visibility aka smoke ?
edit on 11-10-2014 by buddah6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2014 @ 11:29 AM
link   
a reply to: buddah6

Probably. It was a steep dive into the canyon, with a lot of smoke obscuring visibility.



new topics

top topics



 
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join