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Most who vote Democratic are clueless to there parties past.

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posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: beezzer

Sam Yorty, former U.S Representative for California (1951–1955) and Mayor of Los Angeles (1961–1973)
1980 – Frank D. White, to run for and become the 41st Governor of Arkansas (1981–1983), defeated Bill Clinton, the incumbent Governor.
1983 – Phil Gramm, while U.S. Representative from Texas (1979–1985) (resigned before switching parties and re-won his seat in a special election). Later U.S. Senator from Texas (1985–2002)
1983 – Bob Martinez, whilst Mayor of Tampa. Later 40th Governor of Florida (1987–1991) and 2nd Director of the National Drug Control Policy (1991–1993)
1986 – William Bennett, while 3rd U.S. Secretary of Education (1985–1988)
1988 – David Duke, prior for running for a seat in the lower house of the Louisiana state legislature
1989 – Rick Perry, before running for Agriculture Commissioner of Texas. Later 47th Governor of Texas (2000–present)
1994 – Walter B. Jones, while running as a Democrat for U.S. Representative from North Carolina. U.S. Representative from North Carolina (1995–present)
1994 – Richard Shelby, while U.S. Senator from Alabama (1994–present)
1995 – Ben Nighthorse Campbell, while U.S. Senator from Colorado (1993–2005)
995 – Billy Tauzin, while U.S. Representative from Louisiana (1980–2005)
1995 – Nathan Deal, while U.S. Representative from Georgia (1993–2011). Later became the 82nd Governor of Georgia (2011–present)
1995 – Mike Parker, while U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1989–1999)
1996 – Norm Coleman, while Mayor of St Paul. Later U.S. Senator from Minnesota (2003–2009)

Many Many More




posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: thesaneone

Explain to you how both democrat and republican votes are bad for America?

Are you trolling?



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: blargo

I was under the impression that the Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964. (?)

I was looking for bigoted democrats who joined the republican party because of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

Perhaps I wasn't specific enough.

Apologies.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: thesaneone

Explain to you how both democrat and republican votes are bad for America?

Are you trolling?


No, I was asking you a question.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: blargo

I was under the impression that the Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964. (?)

I was looking for bigoted democrats who joined the republican party because of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

Perhaps I wasn't specific enough.

Apologies.



1966 – Marshall Parker, to run for the U.S. Senate in South Carolina; twice defeated by Fritz Hollings
1966 - Joseph O. Rogers, Jr., to run for governor of South Carolina, the first Republican to seek the post in the 20th century; lost to the Democrat Robert Evander McNair
1966 – Thomas A. Wofford, former U.S. Senator from South Carolina (1956), before write-in campaign for State Senator from South Carolina
1966 – Len E. Blaylock, to support Winthrop Rockefeller for Governor of Arkansas, later U.S. Marshal for the Eastern District of Arkansas (1975–1978)
1966 – Jerry Thomasson, switched from Democrat to Republican while a state Representative to run unsuccessfully for Attorney General of Arkansas
1966 – Henry Grover of Texas, switched from Democrat to Republican while a state Representative before successfully running for Texas Senate.
1967 – William E. Dannemeyer, while serving as a superior court judge before returning to the California State Assembly, later U.S. Representative from California (1979–1992)
1967 – Allison Kolb, former Louisiana State Auditor (1952–1956), while seeking a political comeback running unsuccessfully for state Treasurer, lost 1956 Democratic primary for state auditor
1968 – William Reynolds Archer, Jr., while a member of the Texas House of Representatives, later U.S. Representative from Texas (1971–2001)
1968 – Will Wilson, former Attorney General of Texas (1957–1963) switched to support Richard M. Nixon in the 1968 presidential election
1968 – James L. Bentley, Comptroller General of Georgia (1963–1971), switched to Republican, along with four other statewide constitutional officers. Bentley then lost the 1970 Republican gubernatorial nomination to Hal Suit, who was then defeated by Jimmy Carter.

1970s

1970 – Jesse Helms, two years before running for the U.S. Senate from North Carolina (1973–2003)
1970 – A. C. Clemons, while serving in the Louisiana Senate
1970 – William Oswald Mills, later became U.S. Representative from Maryland (1971–1973)
1970 – Bob Barr, who later became U.S. Representative from Georgia (1995–2003); later left the GOP to run as a Libertarian for U.S. president in 2008
1971 – Tillie K. Fowler, who later became U.S. Representative from Florida (1993–2001)
1972 – Ed Karst, while serving as the mayor of Alexandria, Louisiana; later returned to the Democrats and then became "No Party"
1972 – Robert R. Neall, before serving in the Maryland House of Delegates. He switched back to the Democratic Party in 1999
1972 – Trent Lott, prior to running to become U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1973–1989) and later U.S. Senator from Mississippi (1989–2007) . He was administrative assistant to Rules Committee chairman William Colmer, who endorsed Lott as his successor despite Lott's party switch.
1973 – Mills E. Godwin Jr., 60th Governor of Virginia from 1966 to 1970 and Lieutenant Governor of Virginia (1962–1966). Later 62nd Governor (1974–1978)
1973 – Samuel I. Hayakawa, later U.S. Senate from California (1977–1983)
1973 – John Connally, former 61st United States Secretary of the Treasury (1971–1972) and former 39th Governor of Texas (1963–1969)
1975 – Elizabeth Dole, while employed by the Federal Trade Commission. Later 8th United States Secretary of Transportation (1983–1987), 20th United States Secretary of Labor (1989–1990) and U.S. Senator from North Carolina (2003–2009)
1975 – John Jarman, while U.S. Representative from Oklahoma (1951–1977). He had served for 24 years in the House and said he was fed up with the Democratic Party, which had been "taken over by liberals".



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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In the present: anybody voting Democrat or Republican is clueless and still belives in fairytales.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: blargo


So it is documented that they all switched parties because of the Civil Rights Act?

Also, in the 70's, they were still so disgusted with the Civil Rights Act, that they became racist republicans?

I'm so glad you have all that documented.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: beezzer

when was nixon elected again?

that's right! 1968, and he was the one that coined "southern strategy". hence in 1970, you had a heck of a lot more dixiecrats jumping on the republican bandwagon due to congressional elections.

1964 was a presidential election year, 1966 was the congressional election year, I'd think we'd see some southern dixiecrats wanting to distance themselves from Johnson by switching parties.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:18 PM
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So does the OP understand that especially on social issues, that the Democratic Party was far more conservative than the Republican Party? Up until the mid to late 1960's this was the case. Both parties were fiscally conservative, but the Democrats of the 1900's were, for the better part of the century, the hardcore Republicans of today, in so far as social issues were concerned.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: beezzer
I cannot help that you do not like the answer. Look at the states the switches came from in the 60's and early 70's almost all of them from the South. Two big pieces of legislation, Civil Rights Act and Economic Opportunity Act. Lets look at the voting for Civil Rights Act:
Civil Rights Act


Note: "Southern", as used in this section, refers to members of Congress from the eleven states that made up the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. "Northern" refers to members from the other 39 states, regardless of the geographic location of those states. The original House version:
Southern Democrats: 7–87 (7–93%)
Southern Republicans: 0–10 (0–100%)
Northern Democrats: 145–9 (94–6%)
Northern Republicans: 138–24 (85–15%)

The Senate version:
Southern Democrats: 1–20 (5–95%) (only Ralph Yarborough of Texas voted in favor)
Southern Republicans: 0–1 (0–100%) (John Tower of Texas)
Northern Democrats: 45–1 (98–2%) (only Robert Byrd of West Virginia voted against)
Northern Republicans: 27–5 (84–16%)


Clearly a North vs South issue but there were more Republicans from North against then Democrats. Now lets look at the Economic Opportunity Act :

Vote totals Table 1 Senate Bill
Party For Against
Republicans 10 22
Northern Democrats 40 1
Southern Democrats 11 11
Total 61 34

Table 2 House Bill
Party For Against
Republicans 22 145
Northern Democrats 144 0
Southern Democrats 60 40
Total 226 185


Now this starts to demonstrate the shift of many Southern Democrats to the Republican party. The electorate shifted and then from the list I sent above also listed the politicians that moved in order to be elected again.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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One thing is certian...

Those that still cling to the politics of division like this thread exemplifies....


Will not be welcome in the Libertarian party!!



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: blargo

The results pose another question.

If a vast majority of Republicans voted in favor of Civil Rights, why did "so many" "Southern" Democrats switch to the Republican Party?



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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Lets break down what it means to be racist as an evil Republican in the thread.

1. Don't believe in robbing from the rich, and give to the poor. That makes me racist.
2. Don't believe in people getting jobs, and government benefits based on nothing, but the color of a persons' skin. That makes me a racist.
3. Holding the current potus responsible for his actions criticized his epic short comings both foreign and domestically. That makes me a racist.

Hmm none of that has jack snip to do with racist.

Unlike like the entire current Democrat platform is about dependency, about denigrating a persons self esteem, and brainwashing them to thing they can't survive without government benevolence.

Then their entire existence depends on a monthly government stipend.

That sounds like slavery.

HAving to ask government for permission to buy a gun sounds like slavery to me. Because if the left had their way none of us would ever be allowed to own guns. That sounds like a slave to me.

A master feeds,clothes, 'educates', and houses their slaves. There again the entire Democratic platform.

The Democrats 'were' the party of slavery ?

They haven't changed on GD bit.
edit on 30-9-2014 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:48 PM
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Both parties bow to their corporate masters; think outside the box!



Arhg!



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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Oh and let's not forget who came up with the GD hypenated American name.

We are not simply Americans any more.

We are African American.

We are Asian American

Etc.

That did not come from the GD right.


And just breaking:

After manufactured outrage the US Navy has just been order to rename the Tomahawk cruise missile because it was deemed 'offensive' to native Americans( oh there's another hypenated name).



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 01:42 PM
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Republicans used to be liberals and democrats used to be conservative, then the parties swapped ideologies. What does that have to do with both parties being full of idiots today?



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 02:05 PM
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originally posted by: DestroyDestroyDestroy
Republicans used to be liberals and democrats used to be conservative, then the parties swapped ideologies. What does that have to do with both parties being full of idiots today?


Quite a bit actually....

Some here refuse to deny ignorance and subscribe to the ideology proposed by those very idiots you mentioned. They have such an emotional investment in their particular brand of ideology they can't see the greed, hypocracy and manipulation of their chosen party; Only the faults and lies of their opponents.

It only add to the surrealism of what has become American politics. Greatest show on earth!!!



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Really look at the voting here:
From the House:
Southern Democrats: 7–87 (7–93%)
Southern Republicans: 0–10 (0–100%)

From the Senate:
Southern Democrats: 1–20 (5–95%) (only Ralph Yarborough of Texas voted in favor)
Southern Republicans: 0–1 (0–100%) (John Tower of Texas)

So from the 11 states that made up Confederate States of America there were 10 Republican members in the house and 94 Democrats, in the Senate there was 1 Republican and 21 Democrats.

So why shift to Republican? First they were betrayed and second there were more Republicans that voted no then Democrats that voted no. So they could move the bloc to the Republicans and have more influence. Just look at the make up today:
House:
Southern Democrats: 40
Southern Republicans: 98

Senate:
Southern Democrats: 6
Southern Republicans: 16

Possibly 2 more Senate seats will shift from D to R this election, but the picture is pretty clear, Southern Democrats turned into Southern Republicans from the late 1960's to today. There really has not been that radical of a shift anywhere else. Many North East Republicans have been removed, but not a switch like the south.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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Another thread full of hypocrites..


When the left brings up past atrocities concerning slavery..etc...the right cries...it doesn't matter, because the past is the past.

When the right brings up the past..it matters big time and we should all look to it to understand.

What does it matter what the dems were in past..still doesn't change that the right's war on rights towards women, gays and minorities today.

It is obvious they changed ideologies over time.
edit on 30-9-2014 by Onslaught2996 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: Onslaught2996

Yes what the thread title should read is "Most Americans ignorant"




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