It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The original version of the Book of the Righteous Sufferer.

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 04:13 AM
link   
The original text of the righteous sufferer who is seemingly abandoned by his good and suffers all manner of physical, sociological and spiritual torment that in Hebrew was 'The Book of Job' was in fact Babylonian, with the Hebrew version pretty much a blow by blow copy.


Who could learn the reasoning of the gods in heaven?
Who could grasp the intentions of the gods of the depths?
Where might human beings have learned the way
I wish I knew that these things were pleasing to a god!
What seems good to one´s self could be an offence to a god,
What in one´s own heart seems abominable, could be good to one´s god!



It's excellent wisdom literature yet is almost entirely unknown outside specialist academic circles, perhaps because it seriously challenges the authenticity of the Hebrew literature...?

People´s motivations change in a twinkling!
Starving, they become like corpses,
Full, they would rival their gods.
In good times, they speak of scaling heaven,
When it goes badly, they complain of going down to hell.
I have pondered these things; I have made no sense of them.
But as for me, in despair a whirlwind is driving me!




As is much discussed around these parts Satan makes his only real entrance into biblical lore in the Book of Job, however in the Babylonian version the plot against the righteous sufferer is conceived as being brought about by seven malicious courtiers, this in keeping with Mesopotamian tradition of seven malign Demonic spirits, but anyway what follows is a very long series of misfortunes;


An evil vapor has blown against me from the ends of the earth,
Head pain has surged upon me from the breast of hell,
A malignant spectre has come forth from its hidden depth,
A relentless ghost came out of its dwelling place.
A she-demon came down from the moutain,


They assembled their host, together they came upon me:
They struck my head, they closed around my pate,
My features were gloomy, my eyes ran a flood,
They wrenched my muscles, made my neck limp,
They thwacked my chest, pounded my breast,
They affected my flesh, threw me into convulsion,

They churned up my bowels, they twisted my entrails
Coughing and hacking infected my lungs,
They infected my limbs, made my flesh pasty,
My lofty stature they toppled like a wall,
My robust figure they flattened like a bulrush,
I was dropped like a dried fig, I was tossed on my face.
A demon has clothed himself in my body for a garment,

Drowsiness smothers me like a net,
My eyes stare, they cannot see,
My ears prick up, they cannot hear.
Numbness has spread over my whole body,
Paralysis has fallen upon my flesh.
Stiffness has seized my arms,
Debility has fallen lupon my loins,
My feet forgot how to move.
A stroke has overcome me, I choke like one fallen
Signs of death have shrouded my face!


For lack of food my features are unrecognizable,
My flesh is waste, my blood has run dry,
My bones are loose, covered only with skin,
My tissues are inflamed, afflicted with gangrene.
I took to bed, confined, going out was exhaustion,
My house turned into my prison.

My afflictions were grievous, the blow was severe!
A scourge full of barbs thrashed me,
A crop lacerated me, cruel with thorns,
All day long tormentor would torment me,
Nor a night would he let me breathe freely a moment
From writhing, my joints were separated,
My limbs were splayed and thrust apart.
I spent the night in my dung like an ox,
I wallowed in my excrement like a sheep.






In the Babylonian version the God in question of the righteous sufferer is Marduk rather than the Hebrew Yahweh, and the text of the former version ends rather suddenly like the latter with full restoration made by Marduk;


The Lord took hold of me,
The Lord set me on my feet,
The Lord revived me,
He rescued me from the pit
He summoned me from destruction
.... he pulled me from the river of death,
.... he took my hand.
He who smote me,
Marduk, he restored me!



The full text here of The Book of the Righteous Sufferer, it's important in terms of understanding Babylonian conceptions of raising the dead, this seems to be in a metaphorical sense applied to those who have become debilitated in life and lost their status in society.


The Babylonians saw how Marduk can restore to life,
And all mouths proclaimed his greatness,
"Who would have said he would see his sun?
"Who would have imagined that we would pass through this street?
"Who but Marduk revived him as he was dying?
"Besides Sarpanitum, which goddess bestowed his breath of life?
"Marduk can restore to life from the grave,
"Sarpanitum knows how to rescue from annihilation,
"Wherever earth is founded, heavens are stretched wide



In many ways this is similar to the Cult of Nungal from Sumeria, were a person could be sent into a Netherworld place of punishment albeit with the prospect of return, entering in by the gate of sunset and emerging from the gate of sunrise, at the end of the Babylonian narrative the restored person marks a whole series of gates in passing which represented the stages of the ordeal, which therefore also lent itself to ritualization.

It isn't apparent in this translation but in the literal translation the Demons were understood as emerging from the E-Kur, the rehabilitation centre of Nungal at Nippur, were E-Kur here is translated as 'mountain' that a she Demon emerges from.
edit on Kam731182vAmerica/ChicagoWednesday0231 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 05:58 AM
link   
Interesting. I'm not surprised, as much of the bible is a reworking of old stories. That doesn't harm the bible in my view, but actually magnifies it. All of history is a continual reforming of previous thought. We see it in the bible with the prophets, criticizing and blatantly saying that God did not give the command for sacrifice and burnt offering.

Have you read Karen Armstrong at all? The history of God is a very fascinating look at the development of the ideas of God.




posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 08:58 AM
link   
a reply to: zardust

Another awesome read is Robert Wright's The Evolution of God. Much less "dry" than Armstrong's book - but I've read both in their enirety.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 10:08 AM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

I feel like I've read some blurbs, but I'm not sure.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 10:15 AM
link   
a reply to: zardust

Oh, you'd remember if you'd read it. It's quite humorous, very entertaining, quick reading, but a long book with EXCELLENT notes and appendices. I highly recommend it...especially if you managed Armstrong's equally-long and equally-intelligent tome.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 10:48 AM
link   
Seems like righteousness and suffering go hand in hand these days. If you're not suffering, you're not righteous. And then they go out of their way to instill suffering in others, to provoke suffering upon themselves, in order to recreate their own "righteousness" in everyone else and perpetuate their own, and then "misery" becomes "holy". Not just holy, but an essential aspect of life. We must suffer because that means we are worth something to someone. Or something.

Martyrdom seems a little archaic for the 21st century, but maybe it's just me.
edit on 2-7-2014 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 11:26 AM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Do you change your Avatar weekly?

I have seen at least three variations.

Just wondering..........



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 11:57 AM
link   
Hmmm She-Demons from the mountains eh? Reminds me of someone I know...

Well good to know even in early times men believed they could find sanctuary from this world's woes.

@BuzzyWigs I have put that book on hold.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 11:58 AM
link   
a reply to: HardHead

No. Seasonally.
This is my second long-term one - for summer. (yeah, I had two very brief entree avatars)
Anyway, have you read any of the books mentioned??


edit on 7/2/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)


Oh, and, welcome to ATS.

edit on 7/2/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 12:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: HardHead

No. Seasonally.
This is my second one - for summer.


In other words, Hardhead is having trouble counting today.

edit on 2-7-2014 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 12:13 PM
link   
a reply to: zardust


My consideration would be does it magnify the bible or the earlier versions and traditions, as i mentioned even the Babylonian version was probably derivative of Sumerian tradition, the later versions might be expected to have more literary style and finesse but all said and done they are only adaptations to suit cultural bias.

The greater mystery for me is how the complex system of Sumeria was developed and how regional Deities were allocated to the various City States which were independent yet the religious centres of the region harmonized as a whole, and the En Priests and Priestesses developed a literary corpus elaborating on the sum of the parts, and that held society together, allocating each person a personal Deity according to status and profession, this was religion assembled like a finely tuned engine.

Later versions changed this bit and that, got rid of the parts they thought were irrelevant, shoved various Deities together, until eventually there was very little left under the bonnet of our allegorical engine, and our illusory car relied pretty much on the driver peddling for all they were worth, so generally my concern with the Bible isn't with what is there but with what isn't...

Oh and no i haven't read anything by the author you mentioned, briefly looking at her ideas i'm doubting i'd agree with them.
edit on Kpm731182vAmerica/ChicagoWednesday0231 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 06:04 PM
link   
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Anything worth doing takes suffering and sacrifice (except sex). Ask any mom, ask any construction worker, farmer, scientist. HARD WORK is what makes satisfied mind and that entails suffering.

So yes suffering is part of God and of love. Wouldn't you agree?



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 06:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: bitsforbytes
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Anything worth doing takes suffering and sacrifice (except sex). Ask any mom, ask any construction worker, farmer, scientist. HARD WORK is what makes satisfied mind and that entails suffering.

So yes suffering is part of God and of love. Wouldn't you agree?


I'm talking about suffering for the sake of suffering. "I am human, therefore I am inherently garbage and must suffer for my naturally worthless state of being". That sort of thing. And some people, it seems, feel that such suffering makes them righteous, pious, worthwhile. The act of suffering through existence as a human is a kind of sacrifice, I guess. A perpetual sacrifice devoted to the glory of your chosen deity. A demonstration of your dedication.
edit on 2-7-2014 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:04 PM
link   
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Well I say those are the minority as any identifieable group always has a minority of something that is extreme. Radicals are found everywhere in small amounts. The majority is pretty balanced no?
edit on 2-7-2014 by bitsforbytes because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: bitsforbytes
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Well I say those are the minority as any identifieable group always has a minority of something that is extreme. Radicals are found everywhere in small amounts. The majority is pretty balanced no?


I don't know. Masochism seems to be a thing.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:11 PM
link   
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Some get off sticking needles in their arms, others killing with a machine gun or beating on the weaker. Some like it with whip cream and chocolate hot sauce..............We all make choices and come from different backgrounds.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: bitsforbytes
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Some get off sticking needles in their arms, others killing with a machine gun or beating on the weaker. Some like it with whip cream and chocolate hot sauce..............We all make choices and come from different backgrounds.



And some people like to tell themselves how worthless they are in order to justify placing themselves in a relationship that relies heavily on stroking one ego or another. Not everybody, not most people, but enough to grab my attention.
edit on 2-7-2014 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:33 PM
link   
a reply to: AfterInfinity

Yup, some do........................................................................................



new topics

top topics



 
6

log in

join