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Weird California sighting

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posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:27 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

Nose. Forward fuselage or forward body, center fuselage, aft fuselage.

The actual nose itself is the radome. It's fiberglass to allow radar energy in and out. That's why it shatters when a bird hits it.


edit on 11/1/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/1/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Cool. I know they seem like silly questions. But always wanted to know. Thanks again zaph👍

You think its single pilot or two? And if two they sit tandem like in a b2 or single file like a fighter jet?



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Gotta be special type of composit fiberglass to handle the forces of the air. Talking about in aircraft in general. Like a 757s nose. Just plain old fiberglass is that sturdy enough?
edit on 1-11-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

Fiberglass is a lot stronger than people realize, but they usually have a honeycomb core out of a composite material, with a fiberglass outer shell.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

This is very cool platform from BAE which MIGHT help
in large aircraft (i.e. Green Lady) taking off from very
short runways or even NO runways!

BAE
www.youtube.com...

and finally try this one as an oldie but goodie Green Lady Design:
files.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:54 PM
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a reply to: StargateSG7

Nope.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

You know now that i think about it fiberglass is pretty tough stuff. Off topic a bit but think about the average fiberglass bath tub. When full its got a person (200lbs) and what 60 gallons of water (500lbs) thats 700 lbs load. Day in, day out for decades with next to no wear, tear or cracks. So yeah. Fiberglass tuff.
edit on 2-11-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 01:11 AM
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This is very cool platform from BAE which MIGHT help in large aircraft (i.e. Green Lady) taking off from very short runways or even NO runways!

Uuuum no,just no...
Fibreglass honeycomb composite has been going around for at least 50 years now..
So Green Lady any relation to Brilliant Buzzard?
Bass with plane design it is very similar to boat design in the layout of station lines,water lines,bulkheads,port and starboard,datum lines etc..
edit on 2-11-2016 by Blackfinger because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 03:48 AM
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So dangerous cleaning that they wear space suits ? Do you think the Japan sighting may have something to see with the Green Lady ?
edit on 2-11-2016 by darksidius because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: darksidius
Yearly Meteor shower I thinks...



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: darksidius

They wear space suits to fly it. All the pilots of platforms that stay at high altitude have had to. Their blood would boil if they lost pressure without them.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I thought the 120°c temp in the 71s cockpit was due to the aircraft heating up due to friction. Fuselage was 250°c. But the ambient air temp at 80,000 feet was -55°f. Pretty cold out at that altitude.

Speaking of temperature. I was thinking


edit on 2-11-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)


Ehhhh.....TMI.


However if my edited portion is correct speculation. Than that mean the USAF has something revolutionarily major in the form of engine breakthroughs. Its a hybrid that literally does everything from massive increases in speed. Massive increases in fuel efficiency, range and loiter. Major reduction in exhaust IR signature on certain aircraft granted they have nice cold air from somewhere. Can have its front section in different ci figutations to expose the volume of air it needs to do its thing so that with right modifications can be used not only on fast jets but slower moving ones too. Is completely scaleable and relatively simple in design although its a fusion of a lot of concepts. And the only trade off is electron cooling and colors associated with it and some potentially added weight in some areas.

Cool.
edit on 2-11-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)


Postscript. I wouldnt be surprised if folks start seeing green a lot and not just from the greenlady. Fighter jets, missiles, small but fast bombers. Probably not on the slow moving guys though although they too would probably be using same tech just no green glow. But anything supersonic would glow green.
edit on 2-11-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 12:26 PM
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Now that i truley get the big picture of the magnitude of this breakthrough i dont blame Zaph and others for not discussing it.

Im going to dial it back too. This should be protected imho.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 01:05 PM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
Now that i truly get the big picture of the magnitude of this breakthrough i dont blame Zaph and others for not discussing it.

I'm going to dial it back too. This should be protected imho.


And just when it was getting exciting and you managed to get Zaph to say more than one word answers!


I'm going with a twin tail canted outward, stretched delta with "sabre" style twin engines buried like the B2.

What say you Zaph!! I know you cant and probably wont lol but its fun to speculate.
edit on 2-11-2016 by Kurokage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: StargateSG7

Nope.


You could try what I call the 1950's style of high-sweep delta designs:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

or the more modern Swing-wing style:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

That might work for ya!



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
Now that i truley get the big picture of the magnitude of this breakthrough i dont blame Zaph and others for not discussing it.

Im going to dial it back too. This should be protected imho.


====

Here's what we do on our side up here in Canada!

We encase the ENTIRE compressor stage in a high
thermodynamically active liquid cooling jacket.

Even the variable-pitch, S-shaped compressor BLADES have cooling
tunnels built into them taking heat away as fast as possible!
We've also been experimenting with magnetic bearings on
the compressor stage fans which normally die magnetism-wise
in a high temperature environment BUT again, active cooling with
coolant fluid that doesn't break down in high heat can work.
We've been looking at thermal compounds similar to X1-R brand lubricants
(i.e. NOT the Teflon-infused kinds --- needs HIGH HEAT resistance!)
as the final coolant fluid. If you're cheap and running low on time,
we goto BASF or 3M for their Silicon Oils as a Heat Transfer Fluid (HFT)
but I think the X1-R and it's derivatives might work better fo you!

X1-R functional properties:
micronel.net...

A multi-layer wound-coil structure of ceramic-like composite tubing
wrapped around the entire engine absorbs heat into the cooling
liquid (we just buy the 3M or the BASF stuff for now!) which gets
sent to an internal heat exchanger system which is a large block
of hexagonal-celled, aluminum alloy stacked layers (with 3mm
floors and 2mm walls all with drilled holes) containing another
LONG-TERM heat absorbing ULTRA HIGH SURFACE AREA
powder (looks like black laser printer toner) which keeps the
heat in until its maximum thermal capacity is reached
(which can take quite a few hours -- long enough for
most missions of 8-to-12 hours or less!)

The outer hull skin is dimpled golf-ball-like ceramic coating
(usually aluminum oxide based ceramic) with another set of
wound-coils filled with liquid coolant to allow a THERMAL
PROFILE to be set by using a computer system to open
and close valves that allow or disallow the exchange
of coolant fluid to and from the outer hull into the
interior heat sink. This allows us to "Fake" a specific
thermal hull signature.

The engine exhaust can be further cooled via S-curve
ducting also wrapped in liquid coolant tubing and with
a non-ignitable volatile compound similar to alcohol dumped
into the exhaust flow causing rapid expansion and further
cooling of the exhaust.

That's what we do up here!

Although I will also mention that some of our craft
use a machined titanium alloy (older versions of our craft)
that contains hexagonal cells that are filled with hydrophobic
Silicon Aerogel to form another layer of heat sink
and/or insulation.

And not to tick y'all off at LMCO, Northrup or Boeing,
but we've been getting good results in using the fireproof
version of Line-X and Rhino-Liner on the outer hull for
the lower speed versions of our drones. We use 3/8th's
inch as a coating thickness which works really great as
a low-level radar absorbing coating but is a whole not
tougher! You still dimple the outer hull with round or
hexagonal golf-ball like dimples to create a rougher
boundary layer which lets the outer laminar flow
stick better to the hull.

Our high-speed drones basically use a ceramic
infused glass-like coating that can actually flex
without cracking or breaking off into chips for
the outer hull covering ! It's very similar to
certain high-performance paints used on
race car engines. (they can take the heat!)

Since Titanium is expensive as all-heck, we've been experimenting
more and more with aluminum alloys that are coated with glass
ceramics for heat resistance. The aluminum is also MUCH EASIER
to stamp using hydroforming to get the cellular structure needed
for strength on rigid members and outer hull skins.

See Hexcel:
www.hexcel.com...

We pretty much do what Hexcel did decades ago for their
Split-tail Honycomb core skis, but we use stamped and
hydroformed all-aluminum now in aerospace applications!


edit on 2016/11/2 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: StargateSG7

I also kinda like this Brilliant Buzzard Design from the 1980's:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

This might work today with some mods and new flight control software!



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:49 PM
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Glass is interesting but has there been any work been done with crystals?



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 08:15 PM
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originally posted by: Blackfinger
Glass is interesting but has there been any work been done with crystals?


Crystals are usually used for camera lenses and for computing substrates
and for peizo-electric applications and not usually for any strength properties.

Quartz lets through IR (Infrared which is great for thermal vision lenses)
but the crystalline nature of quartz means there is simply NOT enough
adhesion between the microscopic "shards" to make for a particularly
strong product unlike some of the newer "Metallic Glasses" which
have certain non-optic band transparencies and high thermal transfer
qualities nearly as good as a monocrystalline substance but with some
extra ooomph in the strength department.

For pure strength, it will be graphene and bucky-ball
structures (aka Carbon-60). For hardness, it will be the
Tungsten Carbide alloys. For thermal resistance, it will be
the newer hafnium + tantalum + carbon composites or the
hafnium + nitrogen + carbon composites which can resist
7500+ F (4200 C) yet STILL have reasonable strength!

Based upon my latest information, I do have technical resources
on OTHER materials created via techniques and terms I will loosely
call "Organic Molecule Re-organization" and "Nuclear Transmutation"
which can raise the bar on Thermal Resistance, absolute tensile and
compressive strength and other basic material properties but for now
I will keep those a secret.... :-) ;-) :-)

---

The Strongest Material in the World (make that in the White Budget World)!:

Carbyne (a Carbon Allotrope)
www.ibtimes.co.uk...

Again, that is a "White Budget World" material because there
ARE MUCH STRONGER VERSIONS on both the Tensile and Compressive side!

I know something you don't ! aha ah ah aha aha aha ha ha ha !!!!!!


edit on 2016/11/2 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

Sapphire has been used a lot for sensors and windows that demand high durability. The F-35's ventral EO sensor is mostly sapphire IIRC



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