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This Is What Happens When A Magnet Is Dropped Through A Copper Pipe

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posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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I saw a magic trick with just that principle. A metal pipe about 6 inch diameter 20 or 30 foot long. A cannonball just slightly smaller than the diameter was dropped down the pipe taking so many seconds to fall through. Then the magician lay down with his head at the bottom of the pipe and the cannonball was dropped down the pipe again. The audience, thinking that the ball would drop at the same speed as before, would smash into the magicians head killing him. But guess what? Same ball same pipe but the ball took longer to drop through the pipe because some how the pipe had been magnetised some how.




posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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Very cool!

Anyone know what would happen if you took two magnets put them together positive to positive,
placed a magnet at the bottom of the pipe negative side up, dropped the two positives in, and stuck another magnet on the top negative side down?

would the magnets in the middle then levitate completely or would it go back and forth and perhaps be some way we could then harness energy?

My theory may be a bit off but I hope you understand what I mean, the ones in the middle wouldn't want to stick to the bottom or top of the pipe due to magnet laws.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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We had a coworker at my old job who used to perform 'science magic shows' for kids at grades schools all the time. You can get the same effect at home using a smaller neodymium magnet in household copper pipe, but it works much better if you use a 1/2" pipe nested inside of a 3/4" pipe and drop the magnet (he used a cylindrical or spherical magnet) down the center. It would take a number of seconds to make it through 3' of pipe.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 09:22 PM
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Pretty cool vid, or I should say vids the one with the super cooled magnet was interesting as well. They should have done more configuration on that magnet and copper tube video, for instance you can make a gyroscope out of copper or any other conductive material then get a magnet, and like the guy did in the vid when the magnet reached the bottom of the tube flip it around and it would contentiously stay in the tube.

Imagine if the magnet was in the center of a gyroscope contraption and it does not even have to be conductive in and of itself you could even run currents through it. But get it spinning and try to configure it in such a way that it tugs on the magnet in all directions and it should basically just float there or spin on its own access in the center. Once you get it going by an outside power source you and calibrate it so that it basically continues spinning by itself, though not continuous perpetual motion, but if done right it should be able to go for a long while especially if its supper cooled and locked in place.

After all its pretty much the basis that's keeping the planets going in circles and cycles, If anything it would make a cool toy, but you could probably use something like that especially if miniaturized/micro for other things such as a tiny frictionless motor part.
But hey once again nature beat you to the punch on that count, and all other counts.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 12:23 AM
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Anyone interested in magnets should read about Fermilabs giant magnet.



It makes me think about that Chinese scientist who claimed to develop a anti-gravity using giant magnets.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: purplemer

I have a gunpowder scale that was built in 1962 that is super accurate and as you put powder in one side the beam moves (rocks) and you readout the weight on the side, there is a piece of flat copper on the beam that slides between 2 magnets to slow it down otherwise it would 'teeter-toter' for a long time so eddy currents has been used this way for a long time.
Just mentioned this because on YT a lot of people were thinking it was something new undiscovered force.
It's a neat demonstration though, thanks for sharing!



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:38 AM
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And here I thought magnets had no effect on copper, and the other way around. Very cool stuff.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: iclimbtowers
Very cool!

Anyone know what would happen if you took two magnets put them together positive to positive,
placed a magnet at the bottom of the pipe negative side up, dropped the two positives in, and stuck another magnet on the top negative side down?

would the magnets in the middle then levitate completely or would it go back and forth and perhaps be some way we could then harness energy?

My theory may be a bit off but I hope you understand what I mean, the ones in the middle wouldn't want to stick to the bottom or top of the pipe due to magnet laws.


If I understand what you are saying, the 'center' magnet would 'float' against the the 2 magnets keeping it in the middle but eventually it would weaken and pull into the strongest magnet.
A levitating magnet is not a big deal and is easy to do but people that think 'magnet' motors could be made that would move indefinitely is not possible as anytime a magnet pushes against another magnet it slowly weakens until all magnetism is lost.
Also, to take this a little further (I work with high power magnets in the semiconductor business) if a magnet is just left lying around, it will weaken fairly quick as objects around it (including the earths magnetic lines) slowly sap the magnetic strength. If you have ever bought a horseshoe magnet or any magnet with both poles on the same side) you may wonder why they always have a piece of steel across the ends? This is called a 'flux keeper' and it's to prevent premature weakening like I mentioned.
Good question, shows you have a curious mind.
edit on 15-6-2014 by wulff because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:41 AM
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a reply to: purplemer

I have a question.

Would a copper pipe fall be reduced if it fell across a magnetic field?



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:44 AM
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originally posted by: Gumshoe
And here I thought magnets had no effect on copper, and the other way around. Very cool stuff.

If magnets had no effect on copper a motor or generator would not be possible.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:45 AM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: purplemer

I have a question.

Would a copper pipe fall be reduced if it fell across a magnetic field?

Yes, it works both ways, read about my powder scale, that is exactly what happens.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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a reply to: wulff

I'm just spit-balling here, but if you hooked up an electromagnet as the center-piece and an electromagnet as the ring or coupling, then you could, in theory, reduce/control the rate of movement.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 01:59 AM
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originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: wulff

I'm just spit-balling here, but if you hooked up an electromagnet as the center-piece and an electromagnet as the ring or coupling, then you could, in theory, reduce/control the rate of movement.

isnt that how maglevs work?



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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Does anyone know if there is some way to block the magnetic field?
Is it possible to get 2 magnets facing the same pole, and to make it repel in front of each other, and not from the sides? Some say mu-metal can block up to 80%, but others dismiss this.
edit on 15-6-2014 by omeninc because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 09:08 AM
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originally posted by: myselfaswell
a reply to: purplemer

Instantly makes me think of a gyroscopic stabiliser.

Very cool video.

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell


Many years ago, I read the Tom Clancy's "Hunt For Red October" where he made the reference to a electro-hydrodynamic magneto drive for submarines. I wonder if the Lenz effect is the motive source for this powerplant?



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: wulff

Thank you, I have always been fascinated by magnets, however I recently bought a house which has put a damper on my experiments fund, and I appreciate the information about magnets. It has saved me a few bucks!



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: [post=18037090]beezzer
a reply to: purplemer I have a question. Would a copper pipe fall be reduced if it fell across a magnetic field?


originally posted by: wulff

originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: purplemer

I have a question.

Would a copper pipe fall be reduced if it fell across a magnetic field?

Yes, it works both ways, read about my powder scale, that is exactly what happens.


Would it though?
What is happening as the magnet falls through the copper or aluminum pipe is the magnetism bounces off the wall back onto the falling magnet. The copper or aluminum is only reflecting the magnets magnetism back onto itself. The North and Souths oppositions reflecting back onto the magnet are slowing it down and make the magnet tumble as both North and South poles are bouncing off of it. If you were to reverse the process I think once again only the magnet would be effected and not the metal.


edit on 15-6-2014 by TheLieWeLive because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 09:56 AM
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Yes.. I believe it does...

but don't quote me on that
.. I haven't googled it' yet..


originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: beezzer
a reply to: wulff

I'm just spit-balling here, but if you hooked up an electromagnet as the center-piece and an electromagnet as the ring or coupling, then you could, in theory, reduce/control the rate of movement.

isnt that how maglevs work?



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: TheLieWeLive

Ever hear of Newton's third law?
"When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction on the first body."

If one is pushing against the other, then the other is pushing back, right?




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