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This Is What Happens When A Magnet Is Dropped Through A Copper Pipe

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posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: purplemer

Correction!

This is what happens when a spinning magnet goes through a copper pipe.

Other Correction!

There is more to this video than one spinning magnet through a copper pipe!

edit on 16-6-2014 by bitsforbytes because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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Would still love a knowledgeable answer to this:

I have what might be a silly question from a layman but I'm curious . . .

COULD one take a copper or aluminum pipe of WHAT IDEAL LENGTH??? . . .

and devise an electric mechanism to turn the pipe upside down at the optimum moment . . .

SUCH THAT

the electric current produced by the falling magnet would be in EXCESS of the electric current needed to turn the pipe upside down at the right moment--endlessly?



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: purplemer
This is most likely why ppl serve half a life behind bars for taking this stuff....
Do ppl realize that this is already known well i knew already but like your could use this simple thing to help create that flying car or ship.... i wouldn't be surprised when the gov decides to use it in a false flag event.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: purplemer

Neat stuff, this reminds me of that cold magnet stuff



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: GArnold
The 2nd law of thermodynamics prevent this from being an engine by itself in any form. Perhaps you could adapt the technology to be a part to improve efficiency.

What I have seen mention smacks of perpetual motion machines.... no such animal.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN
Nope.. the 2nd law of thermodynamics prevents perpetual motion machines. You would have to continually introduce energy into the system to maintain it's operation.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

I suspected that. But wondered if there was some end run around that issue that I was ignorant of.

Thanks for your kind reply.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

I stated that categorically, but I hope one day we can violate that law with some new technology. Talk about free energy!

The problem is... every time someone claims to have gotten there it turns out to be fraud. The 2nd law is a beeyatch.

Even with superconductive materials that come soo close to perpetual motion... you still have to eventually introduce energy in some form to keep the process working.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

Plausible to this layman.

I just thought that the slow fall through the pipe might introduce some factor that resulted in more electrical energy than would be required to turn the pipe . . . as I initially envisioned . . . back and forth . . . it occurs to me now that one could probably spin such a pipe at the right speed for the magnet to fall back and forth. Spinning it would take less energy than back and forth, I'd guess.

So, if one had say a solar array doing the spinning . . . I'd think it wouldn't take much . . . the energy from the falling magnet would be on top of that from the array fueling the spinning. Would the energy derived thereby be more than could be achieved from added solar arrays?



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: bbracken677

I appreciate the answer. I personally was under the impression faster than light speeds are not possible.. yet NASA is working on technology that allows us to bend space time and travel faster than light. I am curious... If what I suggested is not possible how do we have mag- lev trains in both China and Japan that can travel well over 200 mph.? I think if you can manipulate magnets you can make vehicles that do not need much in the way of petroleum type engines. Perhaps a electric engine would be needed. I am not an engineer nor am I a physicist. I am 46. The idea I had concerning magnets when I was 19 basically has come true. I am not sure why what was posted in this video cannot be manipulated in some way to provide for safe economical travel in either passenger cars or trains. I am not implying your wrong in any way. Just curious I suppose.



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: purplemer

Surprised no engine designs are made from similar technology
Interesting share OP



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: BO XIAN

I stated that categorically, but I hope one day we can violate that law with some new technology. Talk about free energy!

The problem is... every time someone claims to have gotten there it turns out to be fraud. The 2nd law is a beeyatch.

Even with superconductive materials that come soo close to perpetual motion... you still have to eventually introduce energy in some form to keep the process working.



True.. but if the energy introduced were to be provided from solar, wind, or water flow it would be so close to perpetual motion.... maybe self sustaining would be the correct term?



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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Semi-anti-gravity, lol. Even if we understand magnetism correctly, which is probably the case, it does not cease to amaze me. I also find myself wondering how something so intriguing has not been put to even more uses. Granted of course that magnets are used in all kinds of devices from machinery to electronics, but I just think that there are probably many uses that we have yet to figure out. And then such thoughts get me to wondering about technology that the military could possess that exceeds consumer technology, agencies like DARPA and whatnot, and then I get angry. And then I want a cheeseburger. And then I R haz cheezeburger. Sure, I was dropped on my head as a baby. But you don't know me. You don't know what I got. I'm Old Gregg. You ever drunk Bailey's from a shoe?



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: jjkenobi

Yeah, to a degree. Solar, wind or water flow are "free energies" of a sorts, but the technology to collect is not free. In the case of solar, the costs are dropping as the cells become more efficient. I read where wind energy (which is more expensive than natural gas generated energy) has probably reached it's limit in terms of efficiency unless some new technology comes along. Same with water derived energy...close to limit in efficiency until new tech arrives.

Best hope: fusion generated energy. If they ever work out the kinks there and can produce a self sustaining reaction then we will reach a new age regarding energy production.

In my book, the hydrogen cells technology is pie in the sky. Too much of what you read seems like they are trying to violate the 2nd law of thermo. I got into an argument with a guy here on ATS who swore some company had a working car and it never needed fuel or electricity...the hydrogen cell took care of the generation of energy. A constant loop of cracking water, then burning the hydrogen which in turn produced water as a byproduct which was then cracked...etc etc.

lol I looked into it and the company had closed down AND was under investigation for fraud. Investors were pissed lol.

The problem is: you have heat, you have friction etc etc and with those you have energy loss which has to be made up for. So...at some point you have to introduce new energy to make up for the energy lost in the system. The problem with cracking water is such a situation is that it takes more electricity to crack water than is returned when you burn the hydrogen you get from it. Look at it like you want to add batteries to a car, put a generator in the car to use the cars movement to charge the batteries which power an electrical motor. It is a closed system and you cannot produce enough power to move the vehicle and charge the batteries enough to continue moving the car...



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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Thanks for the find OP. I truly believe there is so much power to be used from magnetization that we have yet to harness. Energy source, transportation and so much more.

Now, if only I could really grasp the science of magnets.



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: BO XIAN
Would still love a knowledgeable answer to this:

I have what might be a silly question from a layman but I'm curious . . .

COULD one take a copper or aluminum pipe of WHAT IDEAL LENGTH??? . . .

and devise an electric mechanism to turn the pipe upside down at the optimum moment . . .

SUCH THAT

the electric current produced by the falling magnet would be in EXCESS of the electric current needed to turn the pipe upside down at the right moment--endlessly?


Sadly it doesn't work that way unfortunately. As the large magnet (which is the same as a large collection of small magnets) moves through the pipe, the local magnetic field of each point generates an opposing magnetic field in the copper pipe. Even if the system is turned upside down, that opposition or inertia would still exist. The faster the
magnet falls, the greater the opposing force. Works great as a braking system for a car or elevator, but no good for
perpetual motion.



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: jjkenobi

In my book, the hydrogen cells technology is pie in the sky. Too much of what you read seems like they are trying to violate the 2nd law of thermo. I got into an argument with a guy here on ATS who swore some company had a working car and it never needed fuel or electricity...the hydrogen cell took care of the generation of energy. A constant loop of cracking water, then burning the hydrogen which in turn produced water as a byproduct which was then cracked...etc etc.

lol I looked into it and the company had closed down AND was under investigation for fraud. Investors were pissed lol.

The problem is: you have heat, you have friction etc etc and with those you have energy loss which has to be made up for. So...at some point you have to introduce new energy to make up for the energy lost in the system. The problem with cracking water is such a situation is that it takes more electricity to crack water than is returned when you burn the hydrogen you get from it. Look at it like you want to add batteries to a car, put a generator in the car to use the cars movement to charge the batteries which power an electrical motor. It is a closed system and you cannot produce enough power to move the vehicle and charge the batteries enough to continue moving the car...



The strange thing is that the cracking works for trees and plants. They use enzymes that grab hold of a water molecule and literally whack off the hydrogen atoms using a molecular spring/ratchet system powered by
ultra-violet photons. Two photons are required to whack off each hydrogen atom. When both hydrogen atoms have been removed they bind togther to make an H2 molecules, leaving the Oxygen atoms to bind to form an O2 molecule.

I do wonder if there are perhaps enzymes that could produce fusion in the same way. They grab two hydrogen atoms using two clamshell arrangement of atoms, then snap the clamshell tight, forcing the two atoms to bind together, and contain the energy released using iron or silicon atoms. Those atoms would be needed as they have the most molecular bonds.



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

My reply was regarding using the magnet/copper action into an engine, which is what you asked. As I understood the question I interpreted it to mean something like a self-propelled type (or perpetual motion) engine requiring no energy input. As such, the answer remains no.

If you are referring to using the technology to make more efficient engines or more efficient railways then the answer is above my pay grade lol. I would say quite possibly, but I am not an engineer. Seems like if you could use the tech to reduce friction in any way then heck yeah.

But as a perpetual motion engine...nope. Unequivocally nope.



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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Hummmm...
What would be the effect of , asy 6 of these, connected by a central axle, being tilted in opposite directions simultaniously...
say 1,3 and 5 aiming "up" while 2,4,and 6 slide down....
Food for thought..



posted on Jun, 17 2014 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

Actually I am not talking about an engine of any sort. What if you have a say 800 pound block of copper. Then you have a magnet strong enough to manipulate the block (such as is shown in the video.. by putting the magnet close to the block it moves forward or backward depending on where the magnet is). You also have a area where you can move the copper at virtually any speed you want depending on the magnets strength. I just think something along those lines could be made to move vehicles of one kind or another safely and without much cost almost anywhere there was a system in place that could utilize the magnet and copper. I hesitate to call them roads but for a second imagine roads with magnets underneath and vehicles with copper somehow on the bottom. If the magnet was strong enough and close enough it would push the vehicle forward.



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