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Scientists Report Finding Reliable Way to Teleport Data

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posted on May, 30 2014 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

In fact he's right.

Imagine you want to create only one entangled, "instantaneous message" (aka, the collapse of a particle's wavefunction) let's say, one light-years away of you (point B). You'd still have to move this particle one light-year away from your old position (away from point A), that is, one year at the full speed of light, in the first place. Then to reply back to point A, you must send another entangled particle back to point A (since you exhausted the first pair when you received the wavefunction collapse), again at the speed of light, before you can collapse its wavefunction on demand too.

It'd offer no advantage (even less) over simply sending electromagnetic messages, with actual information in it - since photons already move at the speed of light.



edit on 30-5-2014 by swanne because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 30 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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Perhaps someone can help me out here. Whenever these experiments crop up they always say that they entangled a pair of particles or atoms but never mention how.

How the (snip) do you entangle an atom or a particle?
Do they chuck them both in a bucket and swirl the bucket around above theyre heads?
Do they suck them up with a hoover and spew them out again into a net?
Do they smack them in to each other lke a game of conkers?
Or do they simply train them to hold hands for a while so they get really friendly with each other before pulling them apart?

At this stage for me the intriguing bit is the entanglement not the instantaneous communiation.


edit on 30-5-2014 by Drums because: Typos



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
It'd offer no advantage (even less) over simply sending electromagnetic messages, with actual information in it - since photons already move at the speed of light.
For communication purposes, that's true, there is no advantage to faster than light transmission of information. Using radio waves is as fast as we can communicate.

But the quantum teleportation does have an advantage in cryptography, but not because it's faster than light, it's because the cryptographic information supposedly is not vulnerable to spying. It may be the only type of crypto tech the NSA can't crack.



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 02:05 AM
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a reply to: Drums

There are actually a few ways that this happens. Scientists have used several different methods of entangling particles, and each of these basically starts with forcing two very small things to interact with each other in a very specific way. However, the question you have asked cannot be correctly answered without HEAVY mathematics, which has never been my strong suit.

If you really want to know how these things work, you will find that a wiki search will offer you a very informative result, but you will still be left asking something like "yeah, but how does it WORK!" The difficulty with asking a question of that kind, is that at the very deepest level, quantum mechanics is only barely understood by the scientists working the experiments.

Richard Feynman, a particularly famous brain in the field of quantum mechanics, said that anyone who tells you that they understand quantum mechanics, does not understand quantum mechanics. If you want to understand exactly how profound THAT statement is, I would look him up, watch a few of his old lectures, and so on. Not only will that get you primed for any further thinking on this subject (which is fascinating and well worth it in my opinion), but it may help you grasp the sheer madness involved with investigating the properties of things on this scale, and detail the chaotic, and yet somehow ordered way things happen at that scale.



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 05:57 AM
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originally posted by: Drums
How the (snip) do you entangle an atom or a particle?
Do they chuck them both in a bucket and swirl the bucket around above theyre heads?

lol Hehe, good one though!

The "particle" which will be entangled is most of the time a photon. So, to create entangled photons, they excite some special atom, and when the atom cools off, it emits 2 photons which share the same wavefunction - they are entangled.


edit on 31-5-2014 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

If Campbell is correct, that this Universe is the equivalent of a computer simulation, i.e., digitized, that information performs as matter and energy, then this form of transporting data is teleportation. The Universe will reset to the new parameters, the movement without skipping a beat. The program is modified to fit the new state.

Cool and weird stuff this.


redpillphilosophy.wordpress.com... me-of-life/



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 12:57 PM
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originally posted by: Rob48
All you are doing is simultaneously revealing a random state. No useful information is gained, and it cannot be used to send a "communication".


Indeed. But I believe these people are considering the revelation of the random state itself a "communication".

Or do you mean that since un-collapsed, the probability function refers to an infinity of random states, and collapsed, the state will be one of an infinity of random values, Then it implies that any machine designed to make the difference between a collapsed wave function and an intact wave function will statistically return as many alarms with both, thus rendering the "entangled communication" machine useless?




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