Napoleon Bonaparte: The Exception to the Rule. . .Why?

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posted on May, 13 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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What I find most intriguing regarding Bonaparte is that he was exiled instead of executed. Understanding the precedent of the time it is apparent that exile was common for monarchs, as other monarchs did not wish to set such a precedent. What is absolutely astounding in my opinion is that royal leaders viewed Napoleon in such a light. He WAS a commoner, and easily could have been executed. This told the people that THEY could rise from poverty and obscurity to achieve the same status as a monarch. It told them that they were essentially the same as a monarch in some respects.

The reason that Napoleon was not executed is simply due to the sanctioning by the pope. Had this not occurred when Napoleon crowned himself emperor, I think he would have been executed. I like the military side of history more than the political side, but unfortunately they are too often intertwined.




posted on May, 14 2014 @ 06:34 AM
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a reply to: JiggyPotamus

I think he wasn't executed cause of two things:

1) We was loved by the people and the British knew that the reinstalled French monarchy would never get the respect he did. Executing Bonaparte would not only likely ignite another French uprising in a already unstable France but also ruin any chance of a French/ UK relationship which developed over the next hundred years.

2) The British dignitary's on the HMS Bellerophon struck a deal with him so he would surrender peacefully, the fear is he would have escaped and run of to the USA. If he had managed that he would likely have caused for issues.
edit on 14-5-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2014 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: 8654drp
a reply to: crazyewok

Sorry my mistake. Shrapnel is what the Englishmen used(range app. 1000 meters,canister app. 300 meters.). Which is an example of Wellington's innovative thinking.

English light infantry wore green jackets. Simple yet effective camo. When in the prone position with Baker rifles were hard to spot.



Exactly wellington was hardly only old school.

Although he did use old school methods he wasn't adverse to trying new things out.

To me he had one foot in the old school and another in the new.



posted on May, 14 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

I'm not getting across to what I mean by old or new school. It's a method or way of thinking.

Napoleon waged war in a different manner. Clausewitz and Jomini were the most renowned proponents of this school.

Wellington waged war in a more direct manner. In the same manner as Alexander or Cesear.

It does not take away or truly affect their tactical greatness.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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Just read this and I must say well done Sir ... well done indeed.

He was a man of his time with vision, be it cloudy or clear. it was his vision and he imposed it on the world as he knew it.





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