Uncontacted Tribes Die Instantly After We Meet Them

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posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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Most nations now have laws to protect indigenous people, and protect their native lands. Of course, the laws do not apply if the people are all dead.


Uncontacted Tribes Die Instantly After We Meet Them

...in Brazil, where 238 indigenous tribes have been contacted in the last several decades, and where between 23 and 70 uncontacted tribes are still living. A just-published report that takes a look at what happens after the modern world comes into contact with indigenous peoples isn’t pretty: Of those contacted, three quarters went extinct. Those that survived saw mortality rates up over 80 percent. This is grim stuff.

“Our analysis dramatically quantifies the devastating effects of European colonization on indigenous Amazonians. Not only did ~75 percent of indigenous societies in the Brazilian Amazon become extinct, but of the survivors, all show evidence of catastrophic population declines, the vast majority with mortality rates over 80 percent,” writes Marcus Hamilton of the University of New Mexico in a paper published in Scientific Reports.




posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:16 PM
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Instantly?
TThat is pretty fast.

a reply to: soficrow



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

We have science but there is also the feint possability that like syphilus which is believed to have originated in the america's that some of these tribes may harbour pathogen's to which we have no immunity and in a grand reversal such thoughtless contact could very well start a new plague.
The extinction of these tribes should be cross referenced to areas which later became logged or settled for cattle ranching as well as most likely a few of these tribes were deliberatly exterminated.
A thought Provoking and disturbing thread, S+F.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

This is quite sobering. I didn't realize that the numbers were that high. I remember the fight when Montsanto bought lots of land to plant its soybean crops in S. America and ousted some people who had not made contact with the outside world yet. The world silently let it happen, and I can't help but wonder about the fate of those people.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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"Goodbye its nice to meet you......"



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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originally posted by: LABTECH767
a reply to: soficrow

...some of these tribes may harbour pathogen's to which we have no immunity and in a grand reversal such thoughtless contact could very well start a new plague.
The extinction of these tribes should be cross referenced to areas which later became logged or settled for cattle ranching as well as most likely a few of these tribes were deliberatly exterminated.



Some disturbing diseases are sequestered environmentally (in soil or animal hosts) - ebola and MERS come to mind in the scheme of Grand Reversals. .....Lands are opened up and indigenous people people are unsettled precisely when global corporate interests want to log or mine or cattle ranch....



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: aboutface
a reply to: soficrow

...I didn't realize that the numbers were that high. I remember the fight when Montsanto ..... and I can't help but wonder about the fate of those people.


Ditto. Sobering indeed.

What have we wrought?



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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Goddess forbid there may be people living happily and healthy without "civilized" societies help. Let's go "help" them.

We should be ashamed, very ashamed.

And stay the HELL away from them!!!!!!



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:35 PM
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It might be better if it was the other way around...



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Disease is how the Spanish conquered the place (however misunderstood that dynamic was at the time). But beyond the sordid history, Brazil seems to be handling things better than can be expected.

www.huffingtonpost.com...

And this one, a long man with 31 square miles set apart by the government. Sad but good that something was done.

www.huffingtonpost.com...



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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Am I supposed to feel guilty just because I am from European descent?

Natural selection is not always pretty but let's just blame all people of European descent alive today as if they consciously had intent to wipe out indigenous people through pathogens nobody knew about at the time.

It sucks that so many died but 99.9% percent of all species that ever lived have gone extinct and we all are going to die in one way or another.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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Very sad and surely a lot of these people don't want to be "modernized" into a Western world type of living, that the globalist agenda cries for, for everyone globally. Of course, It would be very tough on them. As some have concluded in studies that the modern world, with new advances in health care as a pro(non manipulated by big pharm and greed cases) which is a plus but technology as a con is making life harder, more stressful.

originally posted by: BlueMule
It might be better if it was the other way around...


Might get your wish, studied now are the concerns for growing antibiotic resistance.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: soficrow...in Brazil, where 238 indigenous tribes have been contacted in the last several decades, and where between 23 and 70 uncontacted tribes are still living. A just-published report that takes a look at what happens after the modern world comes into contact with indigenous peoples isn’t pretty: Of those contacted, three quarters went extinct. Those that survived saw mortality rates up over 80 percent. This is grim stuff.

...

And, how did the writers of the report come about this information without risking even more damage?
On the other hand - if I were out trapsing through the Amazonian forestlands one day, and arrows, poison-tipped darts, spears or a bunch of ugly people started coming my way - I might be all for some napalm-or small pox-like intervention.
(Not really - but - who knows?)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:11 PM
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Interesting study. There was also a part of the study that showed indigenous tribes surviving the initial crash not only recovered, but after a decade, have some of the highest population growth rates in the world.

From the study:

(c) Post-contact population growth rates
Our results indicate that surviving indigenous populations in the Amazon Basin are remarkably robust and resilient to extrinsic perturbations, with approximately 85% of surviving populations exhibiting net growth over their post-contact time series, most growing at rates among the fastest recorded in any human population (~3–4% annual growth, Figure 3). However, not all of the recorded population growth is reproductive because some increases likely resulted from immigration and group fusioning. High rates of population growth will also occur after disease epidemics preferentially impact old and young individuals (i.e., non-reproductive), as the survivors will have the ability to reproduce quickly.


WanDash asked:



And, how did the writers of the report come about this information without risking even more damage?
On the other hand - if I were out trapsing through the Amazonian forestlands one day, and arrows, poison-tipped darts, spears or a bunch of ugly people started coming my way - I might be all for some napalm-or small pox-like intervention. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...


They did not contact anyone, and risked no further damage. Also from the actual study:


Population data were obtained from Ricardo and Ricardo9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and from the accompanying website of the Instituto Socioambiental (pib.socioambiental.org...). Each record included ethnolinguistic names, estimated population sizes, geographic coordinates for each group, language family, the year of contact, and the year that estimates were made. We classified populations as uncontacted until sustained peaceful contact had been made with neo-Brazilians, missionaries, or government workers. We excluded groups with populations straddling international borders because census counts did not include portions in other countries (n = 43).

We used sequential censuses of population observations to estimate the finite rate of population change, λ27, for each group for which multiple population estimates were available during the first 20 years after contact, using the following formula:



where N0 is the population size at the beginning of the interval, and Nt is the population size at the conclusion of the interval, and t is the number of years encompassed. We excluded groups with 6 years apart to avoid biased estimates. This resulted in a dataset comprised of 24 different ethnolinguistic groups with 67 total estimates of λ between the years 1923 and 2010.


Funny enough, during hypothetical discussions with my kids about space and time travel, this very issue arises as our main concern. Imagine traveling in either, or have visitors traveling here, and facing the fate as many indigenous populations?

I wonder how our own immune systems would hold up to the distant past or future, or even other life in the cosmos. What do you think? If we visited, or were visited by others, would this study be relevant to our world population?

edit on 30-4-2014 by Arktos1 because: corrected sentence structure.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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I would think that contact with tribes and groups that have had no outside contact could potentially kill them through disease. This was seen many times throughout history, and the reason it seemed to have gone away is simply because of scientific advancements and a mixing of society. One group is not segregated from another in the modern world. Except for such tribes of course.

So disease alone likely wipes out a large percentage of them. I would also imagine that some of these people may have simply intermixed with modern society. I mean think about this...you're living a primitive life, not thinking such a wonderfully advanced world exists, and suddenly it is placed in front of you. Surely there are those who wish to know more. Who wish to broaden their horizons. Not many, because culture and upbringing likely keep most rooted to home, but some.

In modern times I do not feel that we exploit these types of tribes by finding them and exploiting them, except of course through film and whatnot, with researchers going in and studying them, so it is not like they die off in a manner similar to that of the Native Americans...who were killed or forced onto reservations, and who could not live the way their ancestors did due to a changing continent. No, tribes living deep within the jungles and whatnot, while they may have been impacted by deforestation or something like that, which is still doubtful, are not being killed off in the same way. We aren't going in and slaughtering them or anything.

At least not in modern times. I guess what I am trying to say is that if a new group was found tomorrow, the main thing that would kill them would be disease. They don't really have to worry about much else, as long as only a few people visit them. But if we start sending tons of people over there, it could have a profound affect on their lives in some unforeseen way.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: Arktos1
Interesting study. There was also a part of the study that showed indigenous tribes surviving the initial crash not only recovered, but after a decade, have some of the highest population growth rates in the world.



Arktos1
...They did not contact anyone, and risked no further damage...
...Funny enough, during hypothetical discussions with my kids about space and time travel, this very issue arises as our main concern. Imagine traveling in either, or have visitors traveling here, and facing the fate as many indigenous populations?

...I wonder how our own immune systems would hold up to the distant past or future, or even other life in the cosmos. What do you think? If we visited, or were visited by others, would this study be relevant to our world population?

...

Thanks for the info and your thoughts.
As to the 'hypothetical...space & time travel' - I believe that is one reason that aliens, or visitors from the unknown wear such funky suits.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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I've read about this before. Pretty profound.

We're diseased. We the "civilized" are also killing ourselves but more slowly, that plus we've had more time to acclimate to our own poisons and stresses and to adapt and take counter measures against ourselves. These tribes just get hit by it all at once.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

My grandmother used to come home with dogs she "rescued". Essentially, she would kidnap stray dogs off the street to rescue them.

Around here people don't always put collars and tags on their dogs. Dogs tend to be left to kind of roam round by many people. On my street (a nicer neighborhood by local standards....not a bunch of rednecks) I have 2 out of my 4 neighbors that have dogs that are regularly running around, making use of my yard as a toilet.

Those dogs typically weren't in need of rescue. But my grandmother (God bless her poor little pea picking heart) was a meddler. Most people are meddlers, and they will meddle in everyone else's affairs. That is the basis of most of our laws, actually: meddlers telling everyone what is best for them.

You can likely find several examples of this from people you know. It isn't uncommon.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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Our analysis dramatically quantifies the devastating effects of European colonization on indigenous Amazonians.


I take exception to this because "European colonization" hasn't been happening for at least a century or two. If those tribes are dying nowadays, it's not Europe that's causing it/letting it happen, it's the Brazilian government.

In other words, the "evil, meddling white people" narrative needs to stop. Brazilians come in many different stripes and colors, many of them with mixed origins.
edit on 30-4-2014 by AnIntellectualRedneck because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: AnIntellectualRedneck

The rest of the world outside of their little, small parcel of land is "European". AKA: "Western Culture", which has permeated every nook and cranny of the globe





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