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There is NO SUCH THING As a Dissapearing Plane in the 21st Century.

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posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

It's still possible to knock the power out accidentally. It's just rare for it to happen.


how would you accidentally knock out a robust power bus? Walk amd trip on a wire?

GS




posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: GeminiSky




posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: BobAthome


Nice try.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: GeminiSky

Who said a person had to do it? Electrical or oxygen fire in the electronics bay would do it.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 11:35 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

Who said a person had to do it? Electrical or oxygen fire in the electronics bay would do it.



don't they have a fire control system for that



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: GeminiSky


Not in the electronics bay. The fire suppression system is in the cargo hold. It's up to the crew to deal with a fire anywhere else.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky


Not in the electronics bay. The fire suppression system is in the cargo hold. It's up to the crew to deal with a fire anywhere else.


photo of fire or it didn't Happen!



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

Who said a person had to do it? Electrical or oxygen fire in the electronics bay would do it.


Wasn't there a fire suppression tank found some time ago? Halon gas?



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

Yes, but there were other crashes in the area that it could be from. I don't know if the tanks have airframe specific serial numbers, but it could be from this plane.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

Who said a person had to do it? Electrical or oxygen fire in the electronics bay would do it.


Wasn't there a fire suppression tank found some time ago? Halon gas?


Oh that halon.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: openminded2011

You're correct, to a point. The satellite that tracks them is the transponder. If it's disabled, the primary tracking method is disabled.


The transponder is most Certainly NOT a satellite. The transponder equipment on an aircraft is a UHF radio receiver and transmitter hooked up to an altimeter so when the transponder is in Mode C, altitude information is appended to the radio signal. How it works is that a ground radar antenna sends out a signal at 1030 megahertz which is received by the aircraft unit. The transponder, having been interrogated by the ground station, replies with a radio signal at1090 MHz and that signal contains the aircraft ID and altitude - not location. The ground radar screen then correlates the primary radar return with this transponder info and a blip with a data box appears on the radar screen. For an example, see www.google.com...:en-US
fficial&channel=sb&tbm=isc. The maximum range of this type of radar tracking is only about 110 miles so there is no radar tracking out over the ocean. A pretty good primer on transponders is at www.aea.net...



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

The newer ADS-B transponders can use satellite tracking for areas where line of sight is not possible. It's called ALAS, and is currently used in Alaska. They broadcast their information through satellites, which keep track of the aircraft similar to the way the EHMS handshake does.
edit on 4/30/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: F4guy

The newer ADS-B transponders can use satellite tracking for areas where line of sight is not possible. It's called ALAS, and is currently used in Alaska. They broadcast their information through satellites, which keep track of the aircraft similar to the way the EHMS handshake does.


Perhaps..But a transponder is not a satellite.

GS



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: GeminiSky

Pardon me for not noticing that I missed a "for". I'm sure no one else has ever made a typo.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

Pardon me for not noticing that I missed a "for". I'm sure no one else has ever made a typo.


Nope just you. A transponder is not a satellite...dont those things orbit the earth?

GS



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: GeminiSky

Hence the forgotten for, which would have made it, the satellite tracking is FOR the transponder.

I wasn't aware that I have to be perfect to post anything and couldn't make mistakes.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GeminiSky

Hence the forgotten for, which would have made it, the satellite tracking is FOR the transponder.

I wasn't aware that I have to be perfect to post anything and couldn't make mistakes.



So the satellite is for the transponder...or the transponder is a satellite? Im confused..

GS



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: Donkey_Dean

It's not a naval communications base anymore, it's actually operated by Boeing now.

And I never said anything about Diego Garcia.

So what was that about kool aide you were suggesting again?



edit on 30-4-2014 by AlphaHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Donkey_Dean



I never said land! What does it matter if the base is US or not? Rottnest is host to one of the most powerful transmission station in the Southern Hemisphere


No it's not.

Please stop making up lies.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: F4guy

The newer ADS-B transponders can use satellite tracking for areas where line of sight is not possible. It's called ALAS, and is currently used in Alaska. They broadcast their information through satellites, which keep track of the aircraft similar to the way the EHMS handshake does.


But the transponder is not a satellite. It does transmit to a satellite but the xponder is still just a transceiver. And the only place in theworld that has some Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast capability is Alaka. Europewill have it for larger aircraftin 2017. The US will eventually get it aspartof the FAA Next-Gen modernization.




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