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The Best Flight 370 Scenario So Far - Theory of an actual pilot

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posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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Good to read something from an expert for once.

Does make a lot of sense. I didn't even think about fire.




posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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SMOKINGGUN2012
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


What I have seen from professionals commenting on the subject is that in the 42000+ range you would not be trying to just make everybody pass out you would be making sure they all die. Their comments suggested that instead of minutes it could be as few as 15 seconds to succumb to hypoxia.






That is impossible.Divers can hold their breath for 90 seconds.These people could easily hold their breath for at least 45 seconds.

in any case you can last 3 minutes without oxygen says doctors.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


That is useful, a spreadsheet of clues given out from the media would be really helpful too.

I.E. disappeared from radar, communications turned off, "goodnight" from pilot, sharp left turn, climbing 45,000 feet, ping data etc



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


Just curious how many people at 1am on a red eye flight who are probably sleeping would wake up and hold their breath knowing what was happening? How about zero.......



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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IQPREREQUISITE
reply to post by Libertygal
 


It could be all of these OR...THE LEFT TURN BEFORE LAST COMMUNICATION REPORT IS FALSE. Because the authorities want us to believe that a third party/hijackers are manipulating the plane and/or in cahoots with the pilot. They want to establish malice whoever is the "pilot in command" to avoid, as you guys have conjectured, large sums of payouts to victims/passengers with insurance.

Just a thought.



I don't believe the any of it at all.Why no communication with the ground?
How long does it take to flick a radio switch? 1/10 of a second maybe.
The pilots were so so so busy they could not spare 5 seconds to make a call or just the leave the radio on permanently after flicking a switch.

2 pilots and a engineer and umpteen stewardesses.

All too busy doing what?

For 6 hours?



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:01 PM
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Don't know if you guys read this already. It's really a good read and clarifies a few key points of contention.


MH370 DISAPPEARANCE PLANNED


Some of the key perspectives.

DATALINK SEVERANCE VERY TIMELY


Whoever turned the transponder to "off", whether or not the move was deliberate, did so at a vulnerable point between two airspace sectors when Malaysian and Vietnamese controllers could easily assume the airplane was each others' responsibility.

"The predictable effect was to delay the raising of the alarm by either party," David Learmount, operations and safety editor at Flight International, wrote in an industry blog.



FAMILIAR WITH THE PLANE


Cutting the datalink would not have been easy. Instructions are not in the Flight Crew Operating Manual, one pilot said.

Whoever did so may have had to climb through a trap door in full view of cabin crew, people familiar with the jet say.



MONITORING LAPSE


Even that act of going off course may not have caused alarm at first if it was handled gradually, pilots said.

"Nobody pays attention to these things unless they are aware of the direction that the aircraft was heading in," said one first officer who has flown with Malaysia Airlines.



STEALTH 101


The best way to avoid the attention of military radars would have been to fly at a fixed altitude, on a recognized flight path and at cruising speed without changing course, pilots say.




But pilots said the best chance of feeling its way through the well-defended northern route would have been to hide in full view of military radar inside commercial lanes - raising awkward questions over security in several parts of the Asia-Pacific.

"The military radar controllers would have seen him moving on a fixed line, figured that it was a commercial aircraft at a high altitude, and not really a danger especially if he was on a recognized flight path," said one pilot.

"Some countries would ask you to identify yourself, but you are flying through the night and that is the time when the least attention is being paid to unidentified aircraft. As long as the aircraft is not flying towards a military target or point, they may not bother with you."



I like that fact that these opinions are supposedly given by actual pilots who've had actually aviation experience. In my opinion if you factor all these considerations, we may all arrive at a very sickening conclusion.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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SMOKINGGUN2012
reply to post by championoftruth
 


Just curious how many people at 1am on a red eye flight who are probably sleeping would wake up and hold their breath knowing what was happening? How about zero.......



Not to mention the fact that a diver is taking their deep breath from normal oxygen levels, then holding it in. Even if someone were awake, and noticing that air was getting thin, by that point taking a deep breath and holding your breath would add maybe 1 second cuz the gulped air would be useless.

Still, if the change in course was entered in 12 minutes prior to the "Good Night", as CNN is reporting, then this whole theory is out the window anyways.
edit on 19-3-2014 by dethfromabuv because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


What engineer is that? There hasn't been an FE position for a long time.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by SMOKINGGUN2012
 


Exactly. They were asleep. If they died in 30 seconds or 60 seconds what is the difference. It's not like they could fight once it was depressurized. The more exertion the faster you pass out.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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championoftruth

SMOKINGGUN2012
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


What I have seen from professionals commenting on the subject is that in the 42000+ range you would not be trying to just make everybody pass out you would be making sure they all die. Their comments suggested that instead of minutes it could be as few as 15 seconds to succumb to hypoxia.






That is impossible.Divers can hold their breath for 90 seconds.These people could easily hold their breath for at least 45 seconds.

in any case you can last 3 minutes without oxygen says doctors.


You are looking at possible rapid depressurizing here, could even be explosive decompression. Here is another exerpt from that page and a link to a page on rapid decompression. If this occurred it would cut the times in that chart in half.



A rapid decompression can reduce the TUC by up to 50 percent caused by the forced exhalation of the lungs during decompression and the extremely rapid rate of ascent




Uncontrolled decompression is an unplanned drop in the pressure of a sealed system, such as an aircraft cabin, and typically results from human error, material fatigue, engineering failure, or impact, causing a pressure vessel to vent into its lower-pressure surroundings or fail to pressurize at all.
Such decompression may be classed as Explosive, Rapid, or Slow:
Explosive decompression (ED) is violent, the decompression being too fast for air to safely escape from the lungs.
Rapid decompression, while still fast, is slow enough to allow the lungs to vent.
Slow or gradual decompression occurs so slowly that it may not be sensed before hypoxia sets in.


en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 3/19/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


What about oxygen masks? They could be disabled? They only last for about 15 minutes for the passengers.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:27 PM
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JimTSpock
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


What about oxygen masks? They could be disabled? They only last for about 15 minutes for the passengers.


Would have to be forced O2 at that height for them to work, oxygen masks would have done no good. And with a possibility of the depressurizing causing loss of consciousness in less than 5 second I don't think they would have had a chance to even try them.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by JimTSpock
 


Even with oxygen masks though, what could you do? You can't move around, and if you fight back, same problem.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by JimTSpock
 


Also note, in the event of a fire, Oxygen masks will not deploy at all. They don't want to add oxygen to a fire.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


The oxygen mask system onboard aircraft is designed to work at high altitude that's what it is for. It works at 40,000ft+. But only for about 15 minutes.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:33 PM
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Well what is there to say , I think there is something there not telling us about this plane



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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Don't we know that the left turn was pre-programmed? I.E, non-emergency.

Edit: Actually just read a little more about this and I think I understand now.
edit on 3/19/14 by TheTalentedMrBryant because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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JimTSpock
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


The oxygen mask system onboard aircraft is designed to work at high altitude that's what it is for. It works at 40,000ft+. But only for about 15 minutes.


That would be incorrect: (said in my best Spock voice)




There are five methods of regulating oxygen flow:

Continuous flow . This is the least expensive method of delivering oxygen. Here, oxygen flow is governed by a regulator set at a constant flow rate — usually about 2.5 liters per minute. This flow rate is a compromise. It's more than enough for lower altitudes, but not enough for flying above 25,000 feet. So you can end up wasting oxygen at lower altitudes — a problem that can be solved by the use of a flow meter.

Altitude adjustable . With this system, there's an adjustable control on the oxygen tank's regulator. Flying at 20,000 feet? Then dial in the necessary oxygen flow until the indicator needle (also on the regulator) shows 20,000. Altitude-adjustable systems are more costly than the continuous-flow types, but they give you better assurance of a proper flow rate.

Altitude compensating . This type of system is typically used in permanently installed oxygen systems, not most portable ones. As the name indicates, oxygen flow changes automatically with changes in altitude. Some systems, however, don't turn on until reaching 8,000 to 10,000 feet, so if you want or need oxygen below those altitudes, it may not be available.

Demand system . This is designed for airplanes capable of flying up to 35,000 feet. Oxygen is provided in bursts whenever the pilot inhales, and the tight-fitting, alien-face-grabbing masks (they have to fit tightly to avoid dangerous leaks) have switches that let you select between a normal and a 100-percent oxygen setting.

Pressure-demand systems . Now we're in fighter country. With this system, oxygen is pumped continuously to the mask under positive pressure. This makes it easy to inhale, but sometimes rather difficult to exhale. The whole idea is to make absolutely sure that the pilot has enough oxygen up to 45,000 feet — even when pulling high Gs or performing other extreme maneuvers. At 45,000, TUC is a scant 10 seconds or so, making positive pressure and a well-designed mask absolutely essential.


Passenger planes use "continuous flow". And as noted in the last two anything at 35K feet or up and you have to have tight fitting pressurized oxygen masks.

www.aopa.org...
edit on 3/19/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/19/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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This story made MSM on Yahoo:

uk.news.yahoo.com...



Residents of Kuda Huvadhoo in Dhall Atoll in the Maldives spotted a "low-flying plane" around 6:15 am local time on 8 March, the day MH370 vanished leaving scant trails, Maldivian newspaper Haveeru reported.




Maldivian islanders saw a "low-flying jumbo jet" with white and red stripes across it as on Malaysian Airliners, the report said. The residents heard incredibly loud noise which made them come out of their houses to look for the source of the sound.



"I've never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We've seen seaplanes, but I'm sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly," said an eyewitness.
"It's not just me either, several other residents have reported seeing the exact same thing. Some people got out of their houses to see what was causing the tremendous noise too."



That draws a line from Malaysia straight to Somalia.... or is that what we're supposed to think?

Maybe the witnesses, or the story itself fake intended to build a story that'll ultimately point the smoking gun at Somalia, or somewhere nearby.

Could the pilot have chosen to be seen so as to lay the trail to Somalia, before making a right turn after Maldives to Yemen, Oman, Iran, or Pakistan?

Could the 777EX (extended range) make it that far?



edit on 19-3-2014 by McGinty because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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You know, I just realized an issue with this guys theory. The pilot on MH370 was VERY experienced. Wouldn't he have known that at 45K feet it would kill the passengers? Why would he fly that high to put out a fire knowing that those he was trying to save would die from a maneuver like that.

You have to have pressure fed oxygen at that level.
edit on 3/19/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



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