Drunk off-duty police officer attempts to get arresting trooper to let him off

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posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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Is this finally a little justice or just more shenanagins in the Florida State vs. local PD circus?

LINKAfter failing a field sobriety test, the dashcam video captured an exchange between the trooper and Coriat, who appears uncooperative. WFOR CBS Miami reported that Coriat begged for a break once the handcuffs emerged. Coriat says, “I’m a cop, just like you guys.” The trooper says, “I understand that. But you’re doing something that’s illegal.” Coriat responds: “No, I’m not…(unintelligible).” Then Coriat threatens, “It’s not gonna be good for you. Listen to me…” Then the trooper questions him, “What’s not gonna be good for me?”

Eventually the trooper cuffs Coriat after telling him, “You say you're a cop? Are you saying you're a police officer?...Then you understand how the job is. Turn around, face the vehicle."


from the article:




posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by abe froman
 


Not to mention he was originally stopped for making an 'illegal u-turn'.... *shakes head*

A 14 yr.veteran should know better but then again, he thought he could use his 'badge' to get away with it, not good

They ought to double his fine since he IS a cop and should know better
Some example he sets for the public....he should be ashamed


"The Miami-Dade Police Department would not comment but said that officer Coriat is now relieved of duty with pay."
Why am I not surprised.....


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This is like listening/watching a drunk on the Cops' Show on TV:


Officer Corait continues asking the trooper, “Why are you doing this to me?”
To which the trooper replies, "Sir, I haven't done anything to you, sir. You did this to yourself. I didn't tell you to go out and drink and then drive."
On the drive in the troopers’ car, Coriat is heard complaining about the handcuffs saying, “It hurts, it hurts.”


Oh yeah, he definitely took a page out of the drunks Playbook!!



edit on 5-3-2014 by snarky412 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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This actaully warms my soul in some ways.

Usually you just hear stories of the brotherhood defending eachother and not punishing eachother for the same crimes that the public commits. We'll typically get some apologists try and show us examples of cops being nice but it doesn't cut it when those "nice cops" turn a blind eye to their fellow officers when their behaviour goes against the law.

However, this guy should have received the exact same punishment as any citizen, though, and the police forces consistency to give officers paid vacations for committing crimes is paramount ridiculousness.

In my opinion, these kinds of cases need to go directly to trial before a jury so that the citizens have control over these situations.
edit on 6-3-2014 by TheRegal because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by abe froman
 


I unfortunately am to the point where I distrust and am disgusted by police.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 02:45 AM
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TheRegal
This actaully warms my soul in some ways.

Usually you just hear stories of the brotherhood defending eachother and not punishing eachother for the same crimes that the public commits. We'll typically get some apologists try and show us examples of cops being nice but it doesn't cut it when those "nice cops" turn a blind eye to their fellow officers when their behaviour goes against the law.

However, this guy should have received the exact same punishment as any citizen, though, and the police forces consistency to give officers paid vacations for committing crimes is paramount ridiculousness.

In my opinion, these kinds of cases need to go directly to trial before a jury so that the citizens have control over these situations.
edit on 6-3-2014 by TheRegal because: (no reason given)





the question now is will this trooper get harassed by his colleagues for arresting one of their own.....should be interesting to watch this play out



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 07:48 AM
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To me drinking is the big hidden problem that is swept under the police force rug. In my years as a police wife, I only could name two officers that did not have a serious drinking problem and three others I was not sure about. Alcohol destroyed our families and the children paid the consequences.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 07:51 AM
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Gee, he falls right into the "hey, I'm a cop" defense as if it's been used before with success.

Can't be though because we all know cops don't cover for each other. Never have and never would. Just wouldnt be honorable for America's finest to do such a thing.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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How about some credit for the Trooper who did his job.

Now, maybe the modern day of videos and audio recordings makes one be more honest etc.

GREAT>



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 08:22 AM
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Having worked as a LEO for 10 years I understand giving officers PAID admin leave when involved in an on duty incident, or even an off duty incident in an official capacity, but to get drunk and risk others lives for personal pleasure, break the law, then EXPECT special treatment, NO SIR!!!

We ALL make mistakes, and cops are human just like everyone else and entitled to an oops moment or two, but this isn't an oops, it was a choice that should of never been made.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by IroncladFT
 


Was it just an oops moment though? Whether you realize it or not, making such a statement tends to excuse it as a one-off incident, which it just might not be. I have seen enough LEOs drink and drive and conversed with enough wives to know that we cannot keep on ignoring this as being the serious problem that it is. Some forces house a 12-step program, but it is voluntary, and the culture inside the force seems to want to wait for the individual to come forward rather than examine their mistakes in judgment and help the members see that.

Sorry. I misread your post. You were not saying it was an oops moment, but rather the result of bad choice, though I still read your interpretation as a one-off choice, when I see it as a sign of a possible deeper problem.
edit on 6-3-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 10:30 AM
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aboutface
Sorry. I misread your post. You were not saying it was an oops moment, but rather the result of bad choice, though I still read your interpretation as a one-off choice, when I see it as a sign of a possible deeper problem.
edit on 6-3-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)


No problem. Correct, drinking and driving is NOT an oops moment, that is a poor choice and anyone doing it, regardless of position, needs to pay for that before someone else pays with their lives.

As far as you interpreting what I said, you lost me there, as I think I am pretty clear on what I mean. Every human being makes mistakes. Cops too, and yes they are held to a higher standard by the public, but you must also remember where cops come from, from everyday people who themselves aren't perfect. There is no superhuman or special powers bestowed on an officer that allow them to disregard life's demons. Human emotion and decision making, stress, and life's issues still reside among those behind a badge.

There are 320 million people in this country, with a TOTAL law enforcement force (feds, state, locals) of 825,000 officers to keep the peace, keep order, or however you want to word it. That tells me for the most part people behave, and for the millions who do not, our officers do a pretty good job overall. Yes, the dirty ones will always need to be weeded out, but EVERY career field has a weedy garden.

This incident proves the good guys are trying, so maybe a lot of support for this officer from the public and his fellow officers would aid in that goal, rather than focusing on the bad cop and trying to build off his stupid choices. He got what he deserved and what you all should want, arrested and treated like everyone else, by those who swore to uphold the law as we pay him to do.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by IroncladFT
 


Absolutely. Praise to the cop who did not let him get away with it.



I can attest though that my husband was always waved through when he flashed his badge, even though drunk behind the wheel.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by aboutface
 


If they KNEW he was drunk, that is inexcusable in my book. A mile down the road and BAM, 1-2-3 people dead because they thought it was ok to let a fellow officer drive drunk. Some may not like this, but even if a cop DID let a fellow officer off the hook, for GODS sake, park him and call a cab or get a friend to pick him up, like is done for MANY people everyday by officers, rather than DUI's.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by IroncladFT
 


Please stay just as you are!



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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reply to post by IroncladFT
 


Cops not only let other cops off but their mistresses as well. I was in a car when a Kentucky officer (Fort Wright,I believe) named Mark Schrorer took a call from his side piece (he was married to another cop in Independence KY) that she was really drunk and driving around, he had her meet him at a gas station, kissed her, and when he realized she was way too hammered to be driving he radioed his buddies not to pull her over and then he let her drive off! Shortly after he was promoted to be an accident investigator! SMH.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 08:52 PM
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O.P.'s Link



At some point after he refused a breathalyzer test, Coriat became sick, vomited, and fell asleep in it. The Miami-Dade Police Department would not comment but said that officer Coriat is now relieved of duty with pay


relieved of duty with pay.
Same as the rest of us, right?



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Oaktree
 





relieved of duty with pay.
Same as the rest of us, right?


I think that if it's a criminal offense cops are innocent until proven guilty.

I would also argue that this is better than the two alternatives. The first being that he is allowed to keep working until he is proven guilty and then fired. The second being that anyone could be fired for being charged with a crime.

Example. Say you work at a bank and are charged with check fraud. I don't believe the bank can outright fire you unless you're proven guilty. They still don't want you around the money if there is a risk, so you're put on paid leave since you are innocent until proven guilty. Not paying you = firing you. Note this is just an example and I have no idea what a bank would do, but that's why I think police departments do it this way. It certainly SEEMS wrong, but the alternative is guilty until proven innocent.

When they suspend without pay it's a punishment, but if they suspend with it they are keeping a possibly crappy cop off the streets and also protecting certain rights. I can think of some alternatives to doing it this way and have been thinking about starting a thread on just that. I don't like it either, but it's not as unreasonable or old boys network as it sounds if you think about some of the ramifications of changing the way it's set up.

-------------------

Has anyone else noticed that State Patrol seems to be pretty good about this sort of thing? I think they're more removed from County and City cops or something. I also want to say it seems like they generally get far fewer headlines for corruption and heavy handedness. That and I think the hiring standards are higher.

edit on 2020140320141 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)





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