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FAA and NTSB furloughs due to shutdown may violate Chicago Convention

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posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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The Chicago Convention requires that all member nations to ensure that all aircraft operating in their territory, regardless of country of registry be operated in a safe manner, and comply with all safety regulations, and prosecution for anyone who operates an aircraft in an unsafe manner. It also requires a system in place to conduct accident and incident investigations.

The FAA has furloughed 3,000 safety inspectors, and the NTSB has furloughed all but three of their investigators due to the government shut down. This may put the US in violation of the Chicago Convention and the International Civil Aviation Organizations member obligations.

This could have big repercussions for US airlines, as in the past the US has been pretty aggressive about auditing other nations Civil Aviation Authority (their FAA), and ensuring that they comply with all aspects of the treaty. If they don't, then operations can be limited, and no new entrants allowed.

We could end up looking at US airlines being denied access to other countries, or allowed access on a majorly reduced level than we currently see.


FAA’s furlough of 3,000 aviation safety inspectors and NTSB’s furlough of its accident investigators may put the United States in default of its treaty obligations under the Chicago Convention and the obligations of member states of the International Civil Aviation Organization. The Chicago Convention is the main aviation treaty setting the standards for air safety among the 192 contracting states of ICAO, an agency of the United Nations. Violating its treaty obligations could have significant repercussions for US airlines if the inspectors and investigators are not immediately put back to work.

www.forbes.com...



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


My guess is the people who could do something about it are not working right now either.

There are safety concerns all over. For example the government employees who inspect food and drugs aren't working right now either.

Air traffic controllers and some emergency workers are working without pay right now. They might be fine for now, but soon they are going to be quite pissy having to work without being able to buy groceries.... that is scary too.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by mrsdudara
 


Air Traffic Controllers and emergency workers are deemed essential personnel so they will be paid, and allowed to remain on the job.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


QUESTION.... IF AN AGENCY IS LABELED "NON ESSENTIAL" WHY DO WE HAVE THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE???
SEEMS THE U.S. POLITICIANS LET THE "CAT OUT OF THE BAG" AS TO WHERE MONEY IS JUST THROWN OUT TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT FOR POLITICAL PAY OFF'S AND FAVORS.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


THEN THEY ARE NOT "NON ESSENTIAL", BUT THE MEN AND WOMEN WORKING IN THOSE POSITIONS KNOW THAT FOR PUBLIC SAFETY THAT IS NOT TRUE....

HOORAY FOR THEM...

BUT I AM VERY MUCH AT ODDS WITH THE POLITICIANS THAT CLASSIFY THESE "NON ESSENTIALS" JOBS THAT PUT THE PUBLIC AT RISK. THEY DO IT JUST TO PUT PRESSURE ON THE OPPOSITION...ANDTHEY CALL THEMSELVES "SERVANTS OF THE PEOPLE"? THEY ARE JACKLES.... VULTURES.... SCAMS.....
I'M STILL VERY MUCH INTERESTED IN THOSE "NON ESSENTIAL" JOBS



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I have a family member who is an air traffic controller. Said they are not being paid, but may be reimbursed later.

DC cops aren't being paid and still have to work. That was a BIG deal yesterday with all the ruckus.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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So this could lead US airlines to be restricted from some countries, what does it mean domestically? Especially up here where so many villages are only accessible by air?

Not many people that I know pay attention to what's going on, but might this be a good time to say something? If it starts to affect us domestically, then there are a lot of people who will be needing food and supplies in the really remote areas.

Thanks for the heads up on this Zaphod!



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by mrsdudara
 


They're not being paid now, but it won't take long for them to get paid. They're still sorting out the why's and wherefores, but it doesn't take long. The last time it only took a week or two to get it all sorted out.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by woodsmom
 


It means that if there's an accident the NTSB won't be investigating it. And if your aircraft has maintenance done on it, you may or may not have it signed off on by an FAA inspector. We could see safety standards slipping a little bit until they get this sorted out.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


While that's obviously not good news, I am glad people will still be flying.
Coming into winter, grounding the planes that can't be inspected could be disastrous for some.
I will keep my eyes open for updates. Thanks again!




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