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I want to buy a telescope and need input please

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posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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Since my only child has left for college I find myself with a lot of time on my hands. The evenings/nights are the worst and when I miss her the most. SO, I have decided to occupy that time with a new hobby. I want to be an amateur astronomer.

So, I do not have a lot of disposable income right now, (kid in college sucks all of my cash lol) and found some telescopes on Amazon in my price range. I read the reviews and got very confused. So I need your help.

choice 1

choice 2

choice 3

So which is the best in my price range? (under $150) I know it is not going to buy me the best of the best. I can upgrade when I can afford it. I just want something to start out with that I can get my bearings and learn what is what and maybe see the rings on Saturn??

I welcome any and all input.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


Are you planning on doing any astrophotography? What celestial bodies do you hope to see most?
Star for you for being interested in the stars!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by StarPower
 


Photography is something I would eventually like to learn to do. But for now it is more just re-learning (i took a college class in astronomy many moons ago) where everything is and being able to identify it and get my space bearings.

I would love to see Jupiter and Saturn (the rings especially) and the space station when it is viewable. Things like that.

OH, and Comet Ison this winter is definitely a must see.

I love the stars. I love looking up and seeing how beautiful it is.

I know the models I posted are low end but that is all I can afford right now. Amazon was the only place I knew to look. I also put a feeler out there on facebook on some yard sale sights to see if anyone had one they wanted to sell.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


One more thing, my dad is 75. He is fascinated with the night sky. I would also like to be able to take it to him (a 5 hr drive) and show him whatever I can find!!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


You should do a search in your area for some kind of astronomy club. I know for sure cheap telescopes are a let down. It might be better to hold off than be let down. I can't give you advice on those particular models but you prob need something more for what it is you want to do.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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I would go with choice one. The maker is well known and they make good telescopes not to mention you get a good mount to go with it. It looks like a good starter telescope. I would look into buying some other eyepieces to go with it.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


that is what the reviews say..basically the eyepiece is junk.
then I found this one...choice 4

the reviews are great!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


Visual astronomy can be very rewarding, but it takes a bit of patience as well. One thing to consider are the differences between a reflector telescope and a refractor telescope. Reflectors are great starter scopes, and aperture-to-cost ratio is premium. Newtonian reflectors are often referred to as "light buckets" as they gather a lot of photons at reduced clarity, and they require collimation (mirror alignment) pretty much every time you use them. Refractors are good for wide-field astronomy, and generally produce clearer views, but unless you are doing astrophotography, viewing deep space objects can be much harder given the lower amount of photons collected. Refractors also do not need collimation. I would suggest the Celestron or the Orion as beginner scopes (I have an Orion XT10i). Good luck with your new hobby, the universe is a beautiful place.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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k21968
reply to post by buster2010
 


that is what the reviews say..basically the eyepiece is junk.
then I found this one...choice 4

the reviews are great!


This is a nice little scope but it is 100mm Focal Length shorter than the first choice. Seeing how you was wanting to spend around 150 bucks I would stick with the first choice which is 127 bucks and then get this kit.

Celestron PowerSeeker Accessory Kit Telescope

It's only 15 bucks and comes with a 9mm and 15mm lens and filters. Kellner Eyepieces are among the best inexpensive eyepieces on the market. For 15 bucks it's good deal.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


Thank you!! I love amazon and helpful ATS members!!!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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k21968
reply to post by buster2010
 


Thank you!! I love amazon and helpful ATS members!!!


Be sure to take some nice pics.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


I dont know how to do that???



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:47 PM
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k21968
reply to post by buster2010
 


I dont know how to do that???


You can buy mounts that lets you hook your camera to the telescope. The manual that comes with the scope should explain how to do it. You can also just point the camera through the eyepiece the pics won't be as good but it will give you an idea how pics from a mounted camera would look like.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


I will keep that in mind!! Thank you!!! Point at the lens..haha..who knew it would be that easy!!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 10:15 PM
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I too would suggest to look to local astronomy clubs. Having an "Elmer", is very usefull. Also, the club may have scopes they lend out or members with good used stuff you can purchase.

As was said, cheap stuff can turn the hobby into something less desirable!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 10:29 PM
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buster2010
Be sure to take some nice pics.



None of the 4 telescope mentioned have a motor drive.
This pretty much rules out photography of any deep sky objects, although planets may be imaged somewhat if the exposure is short enough... although then there is a trade off between zoom and clarity.


But having said that, the stated goal is:



But for now it is more just re-learning where everything is and being able to identify it and get my space bearings.
see Jupiter and Saturn (the rings especially)
and the space station when it is viewable.
and Comet Ison


For all of the above (except for the planets), large binoculars are better.
So my opinion is binoculars, but even if a telescope is bought, get binoculars as well.



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 03:08 PM
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alfa1

buster2010
Be sure to take some nice pics.



None of the 4 telescope mentioned have a motor drive.
This pretty much rules out photography of any deep sky objects, although planets may be imaged somewhat if the exposure is short enough... although then there is a trade off between zoom and clarity.


But having said that, the stated goal is:



But for now it is more just re-learning where everything is and being able to identify it and get my space bearings.
see Jupiter and Saturn (the rings especially)
and the space station when it is viewable.
and Comet Ison


For all of the above (except for the planets), large binoculars are better.
So my opinion is binoculars, but even if a telescope is bought, get binoculars as well.


Nobody would pick this scope for deep space pics it's a beginner scope. So for quick shots of the moon or Mars would be fine with this scope.
edit on 16-9-2013 by buster2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 03:12 PM
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More than 10 years ago I went the local Zoo on a sunny day. There were a bunch of telescopes set up and I was like Uh? What you look'n at?

The Sun of course, so I took a peak and was hooked! I saw a great sunspot that day and then on an expensive H-Alpha scope a prominence.


I joined the local club and there as a small yearly fee for me and anyone in my family of $25. They loaned me a scope a 5" SC on a motorized mount. I spent a month learning how to use it! Then decided to buy one of my own. I bought similar model for $800 at the time. It is a great scope much like this Newer Model and has done me well over the years from just observing to finally photography!

I have taken photos like this from it.




But I would recommend a club first as well! It can be expensive to buy something that for whatever reason sits in a box or garage because it is either to complicated or unwieldy. They will let you "test" some out I am sure.

Good luck and feel free to ask me some questions. I am still a Noob but I know enough.
edit on 16-9-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by abeverage
 


Thanks. I have been looking for a club and found one relatively close. I am going to send the President an email. Thank you!!



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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k21968
reply to post by abeverage
 


Thanks. I have been looking for a club and found one relatively close. I am going to send the President an email. Thank you!!


I have friends that buy a telescope like $300 or more and they sit in a garage or in the box they came in!!! Arg! But they asked me for advice and I said "Join a club" just for a month even!

Yes it is a bunch of nerds but they are often sweet and passionate about the stars and I am not sure if you are female or not. But if so they are extremely happy and willing to help someone of the opposite sex.

A Dobson is one of the easiest and cheapest.

Learn a bit more before you get a scope, those you had were not to expensive but you might be disappointed don't expect Hubble images LOL and you often get what you pay for.
edit on 16-9-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)




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