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How Wolves Change Rivers

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posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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purplemer
reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


I would like to see wolves reintroduced to the UK.



perhaps you haven't seen the uk's banking system




posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by iRoyalty
 


It is a good thing---extinction.
Am grateful we werent so smart
to have saved the dinosaurs.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Fragile earth indeed... I started out in biology/botany/zoology and took so many classes on ecosystems...it is amazing how everything adapts and effects each other. So few people care



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:11 PM
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What I took away from this is that all things are connected.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:40 PM
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Wolves, truly amazing and beautiful creatures. There is a reason they became man's best friend. Simply amazing to think that these canines could something so big as change the way a river behave just by being in the area and doing what they do.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:48 PM
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Butterfly Effect, that is amazing.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


All things are completely connected and anyone that spends any quality time in the wilds should know this, those that are hunting for sport might not as their agenda isn't the same as 'quality time'.

I have always felt a bond with nature since a child, and ecosystems are complete systems, each seed, leaf, tree, plant, insect, bird, small mammal, herbivore and predator dependent on each other.

Mankind being a top of the chain predator can work but only with respect to the highest in the chain and the chain itself.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by CellDamage420
 


They existed in the forests in the first place because it works, nature has allowed it as an integral part of that specific ecosystem, the fact humans removed them from the system only allowed grazing herbivores taking over the land which impacted the ecosystem in ways that affected mankind, maybe a sort of ecokarma!



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Thank you so much for posting this. My current dual obsessions are water and eco-engineering, and this provides such a wonderfully succinct illustration of the importance and influence of trophic cascades on a biota.

Great find



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 


Maybe you should look at some flow forms used to resonate the flow of water as it takes up a pulsing motion. Flow forms occur naturally when for example water flows down a beach and leaves little delta or tree patterns.

The correct shapes have been made to allow the water to follow its natural movement through a vessel. The technique is used in bio dynamic gardening and is thought to increase crop production. The same can be seen in opposiite on the outlet rivers of hydrodams where farmers complain the water is not as productive..




posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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thanks for sharing that video, it was great. I love wolves. Some of them can get really big, too. but the little wolves were so cute.




posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


I will, thanks for the tip



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Now that is just f$%*&^n awesome!!! Pardon my language.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


What a great story.. thank you
I love wolves!



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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Great video purplemer!
Reminded me of when I was working at Yellowstone this last summer. My company put me up in a travel trailer in one of the campgrounds. All of the other workers that normally stayed there were on another job in Montana, so I had the whole place to myself. Built a small fire in the firepit and was sitting there enjoying a frosty beverage in the stillness of the night. Fire crackling, slight breeze blowing, when all of the sudden the Wolves started howling. The feeling that I had in that moment in time I will never forget. Will be working there again, the beginning of next month. Pretty sure I'll have to take a snow coach in. Really hoping now to be able to get a glimpse of them.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 07:11 PM
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lonegurkha
Back in the day when the Native Americans lived here without the invasion of the europeans the ecology stayed in balance because they lived in harmony with their environment. They knew better than to mess with their environment because they lived close to it. Even a slight change would be noticed immediately.


That's myth. The directly impacted their environment with little regard for it including several negative impacts. There was no concern for harmony, it had more to do with the tribal lifestyle suppressing population numbers. Look at the pollution issues the larger cultures such as the Mayan and Aztecs ran into.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 



That was encouraging. I guess you could say everything has it's place and purpose. I really liked the notice that the wolf is a top predator, and pretty high on the food chain. I also found it interesting that it was not so much the thinning of the herd but the controlling of the actions of the herd that had the greatest impact.

Not to get off the topic. But it can't help but make you think about that ultimate top predator, the highest on the food chain, mister know it all himself, mister control it all himself, you know who, that's right. And when you start talking numbers as in wolf verses us, what kind of impact are we really talking about?

But the most important lesson.. Well I'm not sure what the most important lesson is.

I wonder what the latest studies are on system changes and the effects on the top predator? I'm assuming they are adverse.

But like I say it's encouraging. The movements of a living system are powerful, indeed irresistible.

In defense of humans, however, I couldn't help but feel the degree of difference in the power and capabilities of man and those of those lower on the food chain. Perhaps that old fashioned Yankee ingenuity and our ability to tinker will keep us in good stead. We're counting on it.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:18 PM
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There is a reason why nature usually ends up perfecting niches in the environment. Life overall, seems to find just the right balance for everything to thrive if left alone by meddling humans and their hubris of "we know better" and planetary impacts.

We are the ones who upset the apple cart.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


One word. Extraordinary.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Those pretty cloven hoofed animals are deer not a dear though you are dear for bringing us this story. Oh and that photo is a huskey not a wolf. Wolves have brown eyes huskies can have blue or brown and often have one of each color. Your pic looks like my precious Nakita a beautiful husky who lived to be 15 years. That is old for a large breed.
edit on PMu28u0220755282014-02-15T23:55:34-06:00 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



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