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DVR Cameras In Your Personal Vehicle

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posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Blackmarketeer


I believe that is where you record audio as well. Courts will uphold an "expectation of privacy" when it comes to audio/video recording. Some cities have enacted laws against recording police.

I don't think any of this prohibits video recording from a dash cam. I've had both cops and insurance agents tell me using a dash cam is highly recommended, and the DVR's are dirt cheap.

This is actually not true. There is no expectation of privacy in public and more and more the 2-party consent states have reinforced that. There's no place where recording police is illegal in US.
edit on 16/2/2014 by PsykoOps because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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Wrabbit2000
I think these are an outstanding idea...if they are used as a routine matter and not forgotten about after the 'Nifty' factor wears off for it.

One thing I'd recommend though is know your laws. Some states see no distinction between public filming and 'wiretap' laws for recording someone else (in person or otherwise) without their knowledge. That mainly comes in where the camera may record audio or even video of a discussion at your side window, for instance. The devil is always in the details.


In the US filming someone or something on public property is legal unless posted. i was a press photographer and you have to understand the law.
By the way i have see a lot of media violate this by filming people on there own property without permission.

Also someone may film anyone or anything on THERE property owned or rented.



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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spooky24
If you are installing cameras because you frightened of 'interdiction from law enforcement' then you have some issues more important than installing cameras. Paranoid, delusional fear, of inordinate or respect figures can fall under the reign of persecutory delusions are a frequent symptom of psychosis.

Persecutory delusions for instance, the more a belief is implausible, unfounded, strongly held, not shared by others, distressing and preoccupying, the more likely it is to be considered a delusion.

Anxiety over getting a ticket by a patrol officer for breaking the law is normal-and police are trained to know the difference between simple regret(at getting caught) and one suffering from a delusional psychosis. The filming of any crime scene event is only useful to the media as without a chain of evidence these videos are worthless in court.

Patrol officers today no longer need to call for 'back up' to assist them in troublesome traffic stops. Since license plate scans now load data to the officers terminals in less that a second these scans also pick up such things as window tint violations and the presents of cameras. So this automatically upgrades the stop to 'hazardous' even before the officers makes verbal contact.

So if the dash scan or the officers visual scan sees a camera then the stop elevates and backup is automatically called.

In other words you just made the entire situation 10 times worse than it should be.


BS. If you've ever been pulled from a car and beaten by a cop, you would not have that viewpoint. I've had that happen, my charge was "driving suspiciously".

Russia has dashcams everywhere as insurance against the corrupt police. We're needing them in the US at this point too.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by ANNED
 


You dont need a permission to film on other peoples property either. Only thing they can do is to tresspass you but they can't stop you from filming. Only places that have expectation of privacy like changing rooms etc. can stop you from filming.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Recording outside activity with your vehicle dash cam vs. recording activity inside or audible only inside the vehicle at the side window, are two legally distinct things in some states.

Recording police or not, identity doesn't change the law on recording another person without their knowledge. If I walk into a business meeting in Missouri with my phone set to record, but hidden in a shirt pocket? I'm fine...and trust me, a few folks have a surprise coming to hear their own words back in a case I'm in the process of filing against the School District, where I've done just that.....carefully pursuant to the state law on in-person recording.

A Reporter's Guide to State Recording Laws

Most states allow it by both phone/electronic and in person, as long as ONE side is aware of it. Some states require BOTH parties be aware and that may or may not apply equally to in-person, face to face contact as it does to a telephone conversation from across town.

That's why I note, it's always important to know the local laws. What I believe the Police issue has primarily been about are people openly and visibly filming the public activity of police, where police tried to say they weren't simply covered under existing recording law but actually special to have more rights than any average person...who can be recorded in public venues in open ways and without issue.



posted on Feb, 23 2014 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


I keep my smaller GoPro (Hero3) mounted to the back of my rear view mirror in my primary driver. If I need it, I can be recording in about 2 seconds. If I want to record the area around the driver's side window (if I'm pulled over by a cop, etc.) I just have to turn my mirror toward the passenger window and BOOM! I have a CCP and there is always a tactical shotgun in that vehicle. In the event something ever went down, I have trained myself to think of the camera before the weapons. Again, 1 or 2 seconds is all it would take...



posted on Feb, 23 2014 @ 11:03 PM
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PsykoOps
reply to post by ANNED
 


You dont need a permission to film on other peoples property either. Only thing they can do is to tresspass you but they can't stop you from filming. Only places that have expectation of privacy like changing rooms etc. can stop you from filming.


You can not film over a 6 foot fence onto someones property.
The courts have ruled that if they put up a 6 foot fence they have the expectation of privacy.



posted on Feb, 23 2014 @ 11:32 PM
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That's not even the same issue. If you're in public in US you can film anything even over fences that is visible. You dont need a fence for the tresspassing issue at all.



posted on Feb, 23 2014 @ 11:36 PM
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If you want to waste some time have a look on youtube Russian dashcams... here is one for example



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 06:54 AM
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That's not even the same issue. If you're in public in US you can film anything even over fences that is visible. You dont need a fence for the tresspassing issue at all.


Bull! When the Titans have mini camp try filming the closed sessions from anywhere and see what happens. Those enforcers are much more brutal than the beat cops will ever be. It's on public property but you can not film any of it-and you will get arrested if you try. That is if your lucky and don't get abused by what is known as the bruisers who enforce the policy.

Any NFL city is the same way. Just like movie theaters, outdoor concerts and so many other public events. If you are told not to film it and you do you will be arrested and told exactly where to stuff your 'rights'



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