A Species With Amnesia

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posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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punkinworks10
reply to post by Harte
 


Harte,
Like I said , Mesopotamian.

Akkadians=Mesopotamian

The golden calf idol was the Baal , that the temple was built for.

I attended a video lecture from UC Santa Cruz, by the chair of Hebrew studies, from some European university, on early Hebrew history, from pre history to the building of the first temple.
It was one of the best 3 hrs of my education.

The Canaanite religion existed at the same time as the Babylonian one.
They were not the same religion.

Harte




posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 




where can I get the full pdf??

All i saw where copys on amazon for 200$+ !???



I thought i found the full pdf but it was just an excerpt..
i need more information....now..



thank you so much!!



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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Danbones
there were two mile hi glaciers pre 12000 years ago
they calved...into the sea
then melted...into the sea

So much ice collected in these two major regions and several lesser ones that the sea level dropped by some 400 feet

earthguide.ucsd.edu...
civilization of the day was on the shore...
was being the key word after the above
They were not so stupid as to stand on the beach for a hundred years until they became submerged.
People aren't plants. Well, most people aren't.


DanbonesNow why do we say to "cross" the ocean.....?


cross (v.) c.1200, "make the sign of a cross," from cross (n.). Sense of "to go across" is from c.1400; that of "to cancel by drawing lines over" is from mid-15c. Related: Crossed; crossing.
Source
When you "cross" something, you make the sign of the Cross with the thing you are crossing.

Glad I could be of service.

Harte



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Acetradamus
 


Re Miller and the cross
+sigh+
The book is pricey...its on my list of things to do
other then that the parts of "the cross of thoth" his movie are on his web site
His full movie was out there on the web...



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Harte
 


a two mile high piece of ice hitting the water
can you spell tsunami?

whats that huge ice dam that let go in the middle US after the last glacier again?
wiped out the whole territory in like a day repeatedly

Lake Missoula was a prehistoric proglacial lake in western Montana that existed periodically at the end of the last ice age between 15,000 and 13,000 years ago. The lake measured about 7,770 square kilometres (3,000 sq mi) and contained about 2,100 cubic kilometres (500 cu mi) of water, half the volume of Lake Michigan.[1]

The Glacial Lake Missoula National Natural Landmark is located about 68 miles northwest of Missoula, Montana at the north end of the Camas Prairie Valley, just east of Montana Highway 382 and Macfarlane Ranch. It was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1966 because it contains the great ripples, (often measuring 25 to 50 feet (7.6 to 15.2 m) high and 300 feet (91 m) long), that served as a strong supporting element for J Harlen Bretz's contention that Washington State's Channeled Scablands were formed by repeated cataclysmic floods over only about 2,000 years, rather than through the millions of years of erosion that had been previously assumed.[2]

The lake was the result of an ice dam on the Clark Fork caused by the southern encroachment of a finger of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet into the Idaho Panhandle (at the present day location of Clark Fork, Idaho at the west end of Lake Pend Oreille). The height of the ice dam typically approached 610 metres (2,000 ft), flooding the valleys of western Montana approximately 320 kilometres (200 mi) eastward. It was the largest ice-dammed lake known to have occurred.[3]

en.wikipedia.org...

thats one on land, how many hit the ocean?

How about actually kneeling at the foot of the cross to take a bearing
on the north star...in the constilation of the bear...

an ice chunk the size of manhattan breaks - video
eta duration of calve 75 minutes
www.theguardian.com...
edit on 20-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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Danbones
a two mile high piece of ice hitting the water
can you spell tsunami?

whats that huge ice dam that let go in the middle US after the last glacier again?
wiped out the whole territory in like a day repeatedly

Lake Missoula was a prehistoric proglacial lake in western Montana that existed periodically at the end of the last ice age between 15,000 and 13,000 years ago. The lake measured about 7,770 square kilometres (3,000 sq mi) and contained about 2,100 cubic kilometres (500 cu mi) of water, half the volume of Lake Michigan.[1]

The Glacial Lake Missoula National Natural Landmark is located about 68 miles northwest of Missoula, Montana at the north end of the Camas Prairie Valley, just east of Montana Highway 382 and Macfarlane Ranch. It was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1966 because it contains the great ripples, (often measuring 25 to 50 feet (7.6 to 15.2 m) high and 300 feet (91 m) long), that served as a strong supporting element for J Harlen Bretz's contention that Washington State's Channeled Scablands were formed by repeated cataclysmic floods over only about 2,000 years, rather than through the millions of years of erosion that had been previously assumed.[2]

The lake was the result of an ice dam on the Clark Fork caused by the southern encroachment of a finger of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet into the Idaho Panhandle (at the present day location of Clark Fork, Idaho at the west end of Lake Pend Oreille). The height of the ice dam typically approached 610 metres (2,000 ft), flooding the valleys of western Montana approximately 320 kilometres (200 mi) eastward. It was the largest ice-dammed lake known to have occurred.[3]

en.wikipedia.org...

thats one on land, how many hit the ocean?

Actually, they all hit the ocean.

See if you can discover how big the tsunamis were from the various Missoula floods, once they finally hit the Pacific.

And, yes, a big enough piece of ice hitting the ocean can cause a tsunami. But tsunamis don't cover anything up with sea water, they just wash over it and recede. In fact, a tsunami would leave plenty of evidence of any civilization it affected - mostly at the high water mark.

Tsunamis aren't permanent, and they don't hit everywhere. A Tsunami in the pacific wouldn't touch a culture on the shore of the Atlantic.

Now, please explain to me exactly how we have evidence of a culture existing before the Altai ice dam flood.


How about actually kneeling at the foot of the cross to take a bearing
on the north star...in the constilation of the bear...

I gave you the known etymology. If 6you want to fabricate your own, go ahead. But, it certainly can't be considered valid.

Harte



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


There are some flaws in your logic,
first off, a two kilometer tall ice sheet doesn't calve a two kilometer iceberg. The main portion of the lauentide sheet was thousands of miles from the coast. Look to modern Antarctica for a good example, the ice is more than mile thick , but the glaciers are only a few hundred feet thick at the ocean.
And when iceburgs calve they are already in the water, so no displacement , no displacement no wave.
Secondly the lake Missoula floods were a regular occurance, happening every 150 years or so for thousands of years.
And it wasn't the only glacial lake in north America or the world, nor was it the largest .
The west Siberian glacial lake spanned Eurasia from the from north east Siberia all the way to med via the black sea, Caspian sea and lake Baikal.
Tsunamis leave one heck of a trace on coastlines, the huge chevrons made of deep sea sediments on Madagascar and Australia and in India are evidence for something catastrophic happening in the 3rd millennia bc.
There is an archeologist who makes an argument that troys massive walls were in response to a series of tsunamis that pummeled early cities in Turkey.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Sorry my post was stupid, seems other people are discussing a theory I believe in already. I should have read the entire thread instead of the first post, and then commenting.
edit on 21-2-2014 by DonVoigt because: deleted post i had originally used after reading someone posting the same thing already



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 05:43 PM
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SLAYER69
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Wait, wait, wait,

Hold the phone

You can't just do a drive by posting....

Forget it, he's gone


Hey Slayer

Sorry I missed this last week how can I help?



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 11:26 PM
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There are two key dates for a global flood, around 6500.bC and around 3250.bC.

Here is some evidence for 3250, which is also near the Chaldean/Septuagint flood date of 3180. The average date from the following is 3190.bC.

Some key geological reports around 3250.bC.



3300 Europe, Belgian coast (sea level)
3300 Global, July summer cooling, Soviet Union (cold)
3300 California, Mid Holocene wet (warm, cold)
3300 California, San Francisquito Bay (sea level)
3270 New England, Elm collapse (cold)
3250 Europe, Piora oscillation, Europe (flood)
3250 Europe, Newgrange start (archeology)
3250 Global, Atmospheric methane (cold, warm)
3250 Global, Sulfate in GISP2 (cold)
3250 Global, Stormy weather (flood)
3250 Egypt, Egypt Nile delta (sea level)
3250 New England, Hemlock decline New England (cold)
3250 Florida, Pine bursts (cold)
3250 Peru, Huascaran glacier (cold)
3250 California, Santa Barbara basin off the coast (cold)
3212 Europe, French coastal megaliths (archeology)
3200 Ireland, Cessair (flood myth)
3200 Mesopotamia, Tigris-Euphratres (warm, dry)
3200 Missouri', Pomme de Terre River (flood)
3199 Europe, Irish oaks (cold)
3190 Global, Heckla eruption, Iceland (cold)
3160 California, Sunnyvale girl (archeology)
3150 Europe, Iceman of the Alps (cold)
3150 Global, Sulphate spike (cold)
3150 Greenland, Camp Century, Greenland (cold)
3150 Global, Paleoclimatic flood, global (flood)
3150 Turkey, Lake Van Oscillation (flood)
3150 USA, SW, SW US flood peak (flood)
3113 Mexico, Mayan recreation (flood myth)
3110 China, Yangtze River (flood)
3100 Europe, Stonehenge (start) (archeology)
3100 Greenland, GISP ice core (warm, cold, warm)
3100 Egypt, Egypt, Unification (archeology)
3100 Nebraska, Republican River, (flood)
3100 California, Sierra cooling (cold)
3100 USA, End of alluvial period (dry, warm)
3100 Boston, Sticks from fish wier (warm, cold, sea level)
3090 Egypt, Egypt, Nile (flood)



source; www.stanford.edu...

The species with amnesia are the Atlanteans from Atlantis.





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