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Deciphering the Pagan Stones

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posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


No slapping necessary!
I'm slowly working my way through Alan Wilson's work (and enjoying it immensely) so I'm starting to come to that realisation too. This whole process has been a learning curve of quite unexpected proportions, if I'm honest.
I would be really grateful if you keep an eye on this, and help steer us back on course if you notice any glaring innaccuracies re Welsh history, Jane




posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by Logarock
 





Just a side note. There is an Irish name Sisk. It is of unknown origin but thought to be from a Welsh word Siskus which means stranger. There was a tribe in the Balkans that called itself Sisak. Its also of note that the tribe Scorisci is a candidate for an etymological study the word Scott.


That's what I was thinking, and I think Ramcheck was hinting at earlier. The Scorisci (pronounced Skorissy/Skoreetzy?) is not far from Scotti at all.
The Baltic/Arthur 1st connection just stunned me last night when I was reading -synchronicity at it's finest, but it does confirm what we are slowly unravelling too.
Wilson's worth a read, definitely, because he is so thorough with the family trees he's working with, it's hard to find fault with him.

I'm write up the passage I read about Arthur in the Balkans when I get back, because there was a lot of detail. Since those 'fish monsters' are practically Dacian, I'm wondering if we could 'read' the story in that particular stone?



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by Ramcheck
 



History is screwed. I read and maybe you have to off some of those links that the Celts sacked Greece and carried away tons of gold back to France by one of the tribes that formed the three fold attack on the area. Anyway it is said that this account has no basis. However later in another read it was said that Caesar carried from France a great deal of gold when He ended those wars. And well there it is, all the Greek gold ends in France and then in Rome. During all this even no one asks where those savages got all that gold said to be considerable. Well its because what history has done to the image of the Celts. I mean moderns worship Greek culture. Who wants to hear that those savage Celts sacked the place and some stayed there, and carried away all that gold? I mean they had to be barbarians even today in the memory of history because as one author said the Celts didn't really give two flips about the Greeks so they must have been barbarian rather than a culture that consider themselves better or equal. I mean wow what did the poor Celts do before Roman baths and Greek philosophy?



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 08:56 AM
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Thorneblood
As odd as it may sound the imagery depicted on the "Z-Rod" actually reminds me of a wormhole. I also find it interesting that the "Z-Rod" always seems to appear below the "V-Rod" but above the more mundane soldier on horseback imagery, almost as if it was something that they saw as being above them and controlled by a higher power.

As for the "tuning fork/broken sword" well that reminds me of a key.


Exactly what does a wormhole look like? If they even exist that is, why do people on here always go for the Alien/Space connection for objects from the past ?

Well being a SCOT myself that gave me a little chuckle



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


You're Scottish?
Oh boy, keep reading, friend...



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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beansidhe
reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Possibly right name, but wrong Arthur. According to Wilson, it is Arthur 1st who fought in Scotland, and around the 4th century, after -wait for it -his return from the Balkans.

I'll find the paragraph after work, and link it here, but actually I prefer that. It suits our thinking about the time of the stones much better, that they are earlier rather than later.


Great stuff Beans - Arthur 1st, coming from the Balkans (Haemus Mons), Haemus being derived directly from a legend about Zeus's fight with the Dragon...
A lot of connections are forming and slotting into place now!
edit on 24-3-2014 by Gordi The Drummer because: I can't spell!!



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by beansidhe
 


Scor-isci reminds me of Italian name Scorsese as in Martin Scor-sese. Hes done a few "Irish" movies. Just thought I would toss that out there.



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Maybe Arthur is a archetypal name. Like St Patrick which is really Pa-drage or "of the dragon". He was said to have been kidnaped from Wales so his "of the drage" may mean he was from the royal line or just form "dragon land".

Maybe Arthur is something like this. Ar-Thur, Thur being Thrace. But this is pure speculation. Not to mention how taxing these word studies are. More....Ar-gyle, Ar-gama, ect

Her is something....a town in Galicia Spain said to be founded by eventual Irish hero family ect ect....town is called Brigantia.

The Danube source rivers Brigach and Breg, near mouth, town called Galati. It is denied generally that Galati is of Celtic source but that's to be expected. Its amazing though how the Celtic name for the river survives to this day over the old Greek name for the river ect.

The more I study this subject the more I see the Celtic history behind the history. They were a force to be reckoned with.



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 12:13 PM
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Logarock
reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Maybe Arthur is a archetypal name. Like St Patrick which is really Pa-drage or "of the dragon". He was said to have been kidnaped from Wales so his "of the drage" may mean he was from the royal line or just form "dragon land".

Maybe Arthur is something like this. Ar-Thur, Thur being Thrace. But this is pure speculation. Not to mention how taxing these word studies are. More....Ar-gyle, Ar-gama, ect

Her is something....a town in Galicia Spain said to be founded by eventual Irish hero family ect ect....town is called Brigantia.

The Danube source rivers Brigach and Breg, near mouth, town called Galati. It is denied generally that Galati is of Celtic source but that's to be expected. Its amazing though how the Celtic name for the river survives to this day over the old Greek name for the river ect.

The more I study this subject the more I see the Celtic history behind the history. They were a force to be reckoned with.


I like it Log, I like it a lot.
Ar Thur, "Of Thrace"?? Makes loads of sense to me.
G



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Here's another twist for you. Arthur breaks down to Arth = bear (apparently the Arthur of legend was a big man) Ur....wasn't that the first recognised city/organised 'civilisation'? The Bear from Ur?



Ur was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia, located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar in south Iraq's Dhi Qar Governorate. Wikipedia
Founded: 3800 BC


You've got me at it now!

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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Gordi The Drummer


Great stuff Beans - Arthur 1st, coming from the Balkans (Haemus Mons), Haemus being derived directly from a legend about Zeus's fight with the Dragon...


Possible etymology of the Scots name Hamish? Haemus?



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 01:02 PM
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angelchemuel
reply to post by Gordi The Drummer
 


Here's another twist for you. Arthur breaks down to Arth = bear (apparently the Arthur of legend was a big man) Ur....wasn't that the first recognised city/organised 'civilisation'? The Bear from Ur?



Ur was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia, located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar in south Iraq's Dhi Qar Governorate. Wikipedia
Founded: 3800 BC


You've got me at it now!

Rainbows
Jane


Welcome aboard Jane!!! THAT IS AWESOME!!
Gx



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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Ramcheck

Gordi The Drummer


Great stuff Beans - Arthur 1st, coming from the Balkans (Haemus Mons), Haemus being derived directly from a legend about Zeus's fight with the Dragon...


Possible etymology of the Scots name Hamish? Haemus?


I like that too Ram, but I think they generally accept that Hamish is from the Gaelic "Seumas", or "Seamus" which is the equivalent of "James"?

(Tho' to my eye/ear Hamish does seem closer to Haemus!!)
G



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


He was, according to the Brecon manuscripts, even more unusual than that. Apparently (Alan Wilson again) he was the son of Magnus Maximus, and the general who killed Gratian, King of Rome.
Magnus Maximus, or Mascen Wlendig, is recorded by Tyselius as being the husband of Helen, daughter of King Euddav. Magnus himself was the grandson of Constantine the great, by his eldest son Crispus, and he was raised in Spain after his parents were put to death by Constantine's second wife.

Hence Arthur the first inherited the British throne by birth, as did his namesake and heir almost 2 centuries later. After his father's failed attempt to take over the Roman empire, he returned from the Balkans, home to the midlands.
There are incredibly complicated family trees in his book, whereby it becomes difficult to separate the 'Romans' from the 'Britains' in some cases. But Arthur I did indeed fight, and defeat tribes in the Balkans and brought the banner back as a sign of victory.


edit on 24-3-2014 by beansidhe because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-3-2014 by beansidhe because: Too complicated for me.



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by Logarock
 


This is fascinating stuff, and still relevant since it helps to set the scene, but I'm just reading how in 260 AD almost the entire western Celtic Empire revolted against Roman rule and for 14 years a breakaway territory existed comprising Gaul, Germany, Britain and Spain with autonomous powers. The precedent being set, the Romans struggled to bring these territories back into line.
These Celts were a force to be reckoned with.



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by beansidhe
 


Tyselius = Taliesyn ??

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


Ha! Well, there's another thing!
No one knows who Taliesin was, supposedly a Welsh bard in the 6th AD. It does make you wonder though...



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by beansidhe
 


Taliesyn is pretty well recorded. As far as I remember he didn't actually write anything down himself, but like you say, there are a fair amount of records about him. I believe he was also 'trained' by Merlin/Myrddyn.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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beansidhe
reply to post by PonderingSceptic
 


Thanks, they do have the same motifs there, especially the double disc I notice. Where are those tools from?
I can't upload photos at the moment but I'll do it later tonight.
Thanks PonderingSceptic


These come from Lithuania. During XIXage paganism was still practiced there. Distaffs or some other tools were often given as a gift, so they had numerous ornaments, symbols or sometimes anicient calendars carved on them. Similar distaffs were used since 4000BC in the area. Ornaments didn't survive that long, but the form is the same.

Each disk (on these tools) is ether called a star or a sun (and sometimes one of them is changed to a cross).



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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Just been watching BBC programme on the Plantagenets. I'd completely forgotten that Prince Llewellyn reputedly wore the crown of,,,,,,King Arthur! No wonder there is a myth that Merlin's cauldron containing gold is/was buried on a piece of farmland in my home town of Amlwch!
The farmer at the time became incredibly wealthy overnight!

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Rainbows
Jane



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