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German nuclear shutdown unlawful

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posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 02:04 AM
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reply to post by UnixFE
 


If that is true (I haven't followed Fukishima that much, got boring, quickly), then the reactor itself would have still been fine had the safety systems not been overwhelmed by the Tsunami. A crack in the reactor containment vessel would have been a very minor incident compared to the whole reactor building blowing it's top due to a failure of the cooling systems and steam build up, which then subsequently vented radioactive gases for miles around.




posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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UnixFE
You know that the melt down was already started with the reactor vessel breaking within the first seconds due to shock waves from the quake? The tsunami wasn't the reason although the media try everything to promote this as earthquakes can happen anywhere in the world. If we believe it was the tsunami they can say 'A tsunami can't happen here so we are save'.
There are so many problems with that I don't know where to start, but lets start with your source for your claim about when the meltdown started in Fukushima.

Also, since there was no tsunami in Chernobyl or Three Mile Island which had meltdowns, it makes no sense to say " 'A tsunami can't happen here so we are save'(sic)".

Had Chernobyl been able to maintain primary or backup power I've seen nothing that indicates it would have had a meltdown, though yes it did sustain some damage from the Earthquake, but not meltdown-inducing damage as far as I know. If you have a reliable source that says otherwise, post it.



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 

Chernobyl was due to gross negligence and pushing the max power test too far
there is a Russian movie about it on you tube



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


This is not a personal attack. Your comments are a little nieve. Let me explain.

Side-story: Before Fukushima, the UK was pushing hard for nuclear. They held Japan up as an example of an "advanced economy" running nuclear power stations safely *ahem*, with a great safety record *ahem* and strong regulatory authority *ahem*. The mantra was "if we do this then it will be good here too - look at our (UK) current record".

Fukushima goes BOOM. Suddenly this "advanced economy" with a great safety record and strong regulatory authority looked like nothing but fragments of a dream. Suddenly the "best nuclear technology in the world" became "old, out-dated, and unsafe".

My point is this: if an otherwise apparently safe designs goes BOOM no less than 3 times, then the probability of another accident increases better than exponentially. This is also to ignore the fact that the German government probably knows how the power stations are *really* being run, and knows that if they continue bad things will happen.

As a result of Fukushima, repairs to nuclear facilities in Europe that were previously deferred due to cost, were suddenly carried out (in total, over 1000 major repairs or upgrades were made in the wake of Fukushima).

If that is not bad enough, the likes of the UK Government know the real state of nuclear "safety", and so redact important information that should be revealed in FOIA requests, but aren't.

I can't find it now, but one such FOIA request was regarding Sizewell B and the state of the graphite core (used as a moderator). Sizewell B had details pertaining to the reactor redacted, but in the same document was talk of another facility with a worse problem than at Sizewell B. This other facility was almost entirely redacted, except for the fact the remaining English in the document made it clear there was discussion of another reactor in the country in a worse state.

The Germans closing all their nuclear power stations was a good move, but unfortunately the rest of Europe didn't follow. It is also interesting to note that the Germans did NOT push for Europe to shutdown its nuclear, despite being surrounded by nuclear located in neighboring countries (making its own shutdowns a moot point regarding safety of the population of Germany). The only remaining reason therefore must be that they know something (bad), that we don't...
edit on 15-1-2014 by mirageofdeceit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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Nochzwei
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 

Chernobyl was due to gross negligence and pushing the max power test too far
there is a Russian movie about it on you tube
True, I meant Fukushima when I talked about maintaining backup power. That wasn't an issue with Chernobyl, sorry for the brain fart.


mirageofdeceit
As a result of Fukushima, repairs to nuclear facilities in Europe that were previously deferred due to cost, were suddenly carried out (in total, over 1000 major repairs or upgrades were made in the wake of Fukushima).
That actually sounds somewhat plausible but I'd love to see the source for that.
edit on 15-1-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification




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