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Wild Plants Of Note

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posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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fluff007
reply to post by InTheLight
 


Hi there

This little plant is actually very useful.. It grows everywhere over here in the UK and seemingly in the US and Canada too. Mainly folk think it a weed. But it is so much more than that....! Does it grow where you live...?




Plantain has often been the go-to remedy for hikers plagued by mosquitos. Because it draws toxins from the body with its astringent nature, plantain may be crushed (or chewed) and placed as a poultice directly over the site of bee stings, bug bites, acne, slivers, glass splinters, or rashes. Bandage the area and allow the plantain to work its magic for 4-12 hours. Plantain may also be used to create a balm for emergency kits, or an infusion used as a skin or general wash. It is also a notable, soothing remedy for hemorrhoids.

Plantain is renowned for its healing effect on the digestive system. This is especially useful for anyone who has been damaged by antibiotics, anti-inflammatory or pain medications, food allergies, or Celiac disease. Both leaves and seeds specifically target the digestive system for healing. The leaves may be steeped as tea, added to soups, or dried with a sauce similar to kale chips. The seeds – a type of psyllium – can be ground or soaked for bulk mucilage or absorbable fibre, which, consumed before meals, may help with weight loss.


www.thefutureofhealthnow.com...

Plenty more to read on the link.. Could come in handy if you are out and about and need some herbal help....! s/f



Wonderful post and, yes, I step on it daily. LOL

But this little gem will definitely be added to my salads and stews - but more to come on this re: internal medicinal value.




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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And, so, yet another common treasure that helps with dysentery and internal parasites and is highly nutritional and the seeds can be ground into flour to make bread/pancakes - 'Plantain'.



Studies have shown that plantain has anti-inflammatory effects, and it is also rich in tannin (which helps draw tissues together to stop bleeding) and allantoin (a compound that promotes healing of injured skin cells). Further studies have indicated that plantain may also reduce blood pressure, and that the seeds of the plant may reduce blood cholesterol levels. Plantain seeds were also widely used as a natural laxative, given their high source of fibre. Teas made from the plant, were used to treat diarrhea, dysentery, intestinal worms, and bleeding mucous membranes. The roots were also recommended for relieving toothaches and headaches as well as healing poor gums.


www.greenmedinfo.com...



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


The lovely little puffball would also fall into the category of edible and medicinal.
The spores of the puffball can be used as a topical antibiotic,kind of like neosporin on small cuts and abrasions. They are also pretty tasty sautéed up in some butter when the body of the mushroom is still fresh and solid.

As has been mentioned always know 100% the identity of any mushroom, but this little guy is pretty obvious once you get to know him. I'm not sure of their spread around the globe though, I do know that they are prolific little buggers up north here.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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woodsmom
reply to post by InTheLight
 


The lovely little puffball would also fall into the category of edible and medicinal.
The spores of the puffball can be used as a topical antibiotic,kind of like neosporin on small cuts and abrasions. They are also pretty tasty sautéed up in some butter when the body of the mushroom is still fresh and solid.

As has been mentioned always know 100% the identity of any mushroom, but this little guy is pretty obvious once you get to know him. I'm not sure of their spread around the globe though, I do know that they are prolific little buggers up north here.


I've never seen one here in Canada and I use to hike everywhere in the bush. Where are you?



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


I'm in south central Alaska.
They are everywhere here, my yard is really covered because my sons will find them before me and step on them to puff them. They spread them all over, which is nice, even though they aren't supposed to touch any mushroom. My eight year old already knows that they are ok though.

I live in an old growth birch forest, that may make a difference too, the puffballs are only one of many varieties around my house.
edit on 14-1-2014 by woodsmom because: Last sentence added



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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woodsmom
reply to post by InTheLight
 


I'm in south central Alaska.
They are everywhere here, my yard is really covered because my sons will find them before me and step on them to puff them. They spread them all over, which is nice, even though they aren't supposed to touch any mushroom. My eight year old already knows that they are ok though.

I live in an old growth birch forest, that may make a difference too, the puffballs are only one of many varieties around my house.
edit on 14-1-2014 by woodsmom because: Last sentence added


You won't have any problems surviving up there. Anyway, I know puffballs exist here but if I ever happen upon one can you eat it raw?
edit on 14-1-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


Oh my I apologise.. I did not read your OP properly...!

I have heard that ingesting pineapple can help get rid of tapeworms. Though I do not suppose you have the luxury of wild pineapple's growing where you are...


Allegedly people have tried eradicating sugar from their diet in aid to be rid of the parasites..

Goldenseal is used for treating parasites. Depending on where you are in the US or Canada it can be found in the wild...




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


Yes, they are about the safest wild mushroom that I am aware of, partially because they don't have a look alike, at least not here. They are almost like the cap of a button mushroom without a stem, they are pretty mild.
edit on 14-1-2014 by woodsmom because: Typo



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


I have remembered another for intestinal parasites. The tansy is used for that. Though you have to be careful and know your doses as it could be near fatal otherwise...

Found these too..

Apparently a Native American Tribe used to drink an infusion of Douglas maple as a remedy for diarrhoea...


Some Plateau Indian tribes drink an infusion of Douglas maple as a treatment for diarrhea. Ramah Navajo use an infusion of the glabrum variety for swellings, and also as a "life medicine", or panacea.


en.wikipedia.org...

This looks to be an interesting site..

For diarrhoea..


The following remedies are for use only in a survival situation, not for routine use:

Diarrhea. Drink tea made from the roots of blackberries and their relatives to stop diarrhea. White oak bark and other barks containing tannin are also effective. However, use them with caution when nothing else is available because of possible negative effects on the kidneys. You can also stop diarrhea by eating white clay or campfire ashes. Tea made from cowberry or cranberry or hazel leaves works too.


Worms/Intestinal Parasties..

Worms or intestinal parasites. Using moderation, treat with tea made from tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) or from wild carrot leaves.


www.wilderness-survival.net...




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 05:47 PM
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fluff007
reply to post by InTheLight
 


Oh my I apologise.. I did not read your OP properly...!

I have heard that ingesting pineapple can help get rid of tapeworms. Though I do not suppose you have the luxury of wild pineapple's growing where you are...


Allegedly people have tried eradicating sugar from their diet in aid to be rid of the parasites..

Goldenseal is used for treating parasites. Depending on where you are in the US or Canada it can be found in the wild...



Actually, what I am attempting to do here is pick common place herbs/weeds that serve a dual purpose for providing much needed nutrition and medicine. However, puffballs down here, I think, may be few and far inbetween.

I'll have a look see at Goldenseal and see if it's a dual purpose treasure, too. Thank you.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 05:49 PM
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fluff007
reply to post by InTheLight
 


I have remembered another for intestinal parasites. The tansy is used for that. Though you have to be careful and know your doses as it could be near fatal otherwise...

Found these too..

Apparently a Native American Tribe used to drink an infusion of Douglas maple as a remedy for diarrhoea...


Some Plateau Indian tribes drink an infusion of Douglas maple as a treatment for diarrhea. Ramah Navajo use an infusion of the glabrum variety for swellings, and also as a "life medicine", or panacea.


en.wikipedia.org...

This looks to be an interesting site..

For diarrhoea..


The following remedies are for use only in a survival situation, not for routine use:

Diarrhea. Drink tea made from the roots of blackberries and their relatives to stop diarrhea. White oak bark and other barks containing tannin are also effective. However, use them with caution when nothing else is available because of possible negative effects on the kidneys. You can also stop diarrhea by eating white clay or campfire ashes. Tea made from cowberry or cranberry or hazel leaves works too.


Worms/Intestinal Parasties..

Worms or intestinal parasites. Using moderation, treat with tea made from tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) or from wild carrot leaves.


www.wilderness-survival.net...



I don't doubt that Tansy is effective in expelling internal parasites. I remember reading in one of my herbal books that it can be used to repel ants (insecticide? pesticide?) in the home.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 





I don't doubt that Tansy is effective in expelling internal parasites. I remember reading in one of my herbal books that it can be used to repel ants (insecticide? pesticide?) in the home.


Well I haven't heard of it being used in the home before.. But it is seemingly a good companion plant and organic pest control. We have some in our garden and we do not get any pests.. So I assume you can use it in the home too. And people used to use it on meat to repel pests...
From wiki:


Tansy has also been cultivated and used for its insect repellent and in the worm warding type of embalming. During the American colonial period, meat was frequently rubbed with or packed in tansy leaves to repel insects and delay spoilage.


en.wikipedia.org...




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


No worries...


Do you have Comfrey growing where you live..? Comfrey is a fantastic rapid healant. It knits tissue/muscle together and is great for inflammation. They used to use it a lot in the war for wounds. My partner makes oils/creams/salves and did so with Comfrey root. Last May I had surgery on both hands to correct trigger finger. And I applied the Comfrey oil he made me and it certainly made a big difference..

He had recently made lip balm with Comfrey in it. I had really cracked lips because of the weather and I could chew bits off my lip with my teeth. 3 hours after I applied the lip balm my lips were completely soft and smooth. It was quite something..! We have got a big patch of Comfrey growing in the garden. It grows wild here in the UK.

It is an incredible plant...! There is a lovely passage in Turner's Herbal (1568) about Comfrey. It was in a book I am currently reading:

"The rootes are goode if they be broken and dronken for them that spitte blood and are bursten, the same layde to are goode to glewe together freshe woundes."

I just recently found out that it is incredibly easy to cultivate Comfrey. You can cut the roots up into tiny sections and so long as you plant it in a pot with the wider end at the top. It will grow...!

ETA: This looks to be an interesting site..

www.ediblewildfood.com...
edit on 14-1-2014 by fluff007 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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fluff007
reply to post by InTheLight
 


No worries...


Do you have Comfrey growing where you live..? Comfrey is a fantastic rapid healant. It knits tissue/muscle together and is great for inflammation. They used to use it a lot in the war for wounds. My partner makes oils/creams/salves and did so with Comfrey root. Last May I had surgery on both hands to correct trigger finger. And I applied the Comfrey oil he made me and it certainly made a big difference..

He had recently made lip balm with Comfrey in it. I had really cracked lips because of the weather and I could chew bits off my lip with my teeth. 3 hours after I applied the lip balm my lips were completely soft and smooth. It was quite something..! We have got a big patch of Comfrey growing in the garden. It grows wild here in the UK.

It is an incredible plant...! There is a lovely passage in Turner's Herbal (1568) about Comfrey. It was in a book I am currently reading:

"The rootes are goode if they be broken and dronken for them that spitte blood and are bursten, the same layde to are goode to glewe together freshe woundes."

I just recently found out that it iis incredibly easy


Indeed, comfrey is a wild plant of note, however, I am trying to keep it basic, rather limited to commonplace plants that anyone can use in the short-term to survive. All the other treasures are to be further explored if one is to become a shaman, or medicine man/woman.



posted on Jan, 16 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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InTheLight

woodsmom
reply to post by InTheLight
 


Thanks!

Plantain is another good wild weed. You can use the fresh leaves to calm irritation from bug bites or minor burns. Simply crush the leaf in your fingers, break it up until you get a bit of juice and apply as needed. It works pretty well, and plantain is found in almost all growing zones in different forms. Mine is just a small little weed but is related to the larger plantain that produces the actual fruit. I believe they all work in such a fashion, but I'm only familiar with my little mini weed way up north.


Thank you woodsmom I appreciate your contribution. Actually plantain is edible and has 10gm of salt/Vit. A/Vit. C in one cooked serving (salt is almost impossible to find in the wild) and this plant (and dandelion) were my next study in combining wild greens into salads or stews to help prevent horrible diseases and/or use as medicine.

I was also going to briefly touch upon wound management, antibiotics (? this will be a toughy), antibacterial/fungal, lung problems etc. - but I want to focus just on wild plants that can do double duty (such as plantain) in nutrition and first aid-medicine.








So, to recap what common plants should go into a preventative, nutritional salad (wash well, preferably with homemade vinegar):

Nettle - young leaves: soak in water or blanch (boil 2-3 minutes in water) to remove stinging chemicals.
Wild garlic - leaves and bulb (whole herb used in medicine).
Dandelion young leaves (whole herb used for medicine).
Plantain young leaves (leaves used for medicine - older stalk is fibrous and can be used a fishing line).
Fiddleheads - young.
Violet leaves (the younger the less bitter).

Now the older leaves, can be used in soups, stews, breads, etc.

We are so blessed to have so many edible plants (weeds) in our midst.

This video shows us more backyard 'common' edible weeds that can be used for food.



And now for a little fun - stinging nettle eating contests...LOL


edit on 16-1-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)







 
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