It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Was this Comet ISON's Electric Interaction with the Sun?

page: 1
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 30 2013 @ 10:43 PM
link   
Just sharing a couple of thoughts.




edit on 30-11-2013 by Nootropic because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 30 2013 @ 11:40 PM
link   
Check before the comet came, was the sun still doing that? I'll hold my breath while you find the answer.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:33 AM
link   
reply to post by boncho
 


We actually can't check


The video for perihelion (at that angle and filter) only starts at 18:13:59, we have no earlier footage from it.

Speculative at best?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:53 AM
link   
Holy cow. Check this out.



What what do we know?

1. ISON was observed at a distance of 8 AU from the sun.
www.astro.umd.edu...
2. ISON has never been observed without a coma.
3. Comets are usually discovered without a coma first, and develop comas at much closer distances to the sun.
4. ISON entered perihelion with a coma. (LASCO C3)
5. ISON exited perihelion with a coma. (LASCO C3)
6. ISON would have shown up in the SDO observations if it was emitting oxygen.
7. ISON displayed some potential magnetic / electric properties. i.imgur.com...
Also covered in my previous video with greater detail.

Thus ISON's nucleus is not made out of ice, water, or rock, and neither is it's coma. So, what is it made out of?





and then:




posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:04 AM
link   


that is a very good question.!

wow,,




is it the back-ground, of stars one would normally see?

or is it "full of stars" ??



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:12 AM
link   
reply to post by BobAthome
 


Or is that some glitched double rendering of the sun? or is ISON an invisible sun floating around haha

This is confusing to say the least



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:17 AM
link   
Why were there so many glitches at the time it passed?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:25 AM
link   
reply to post by OmegaSynthesis
 


I think they may have had to redirect their satellites specially for the ISON perihelion, or rather they chose to do so.

Just step through the images and you will see a couple of the angles we captured on the SDO observation page.

A really good example is sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov... for AIA 304 (Red). Look around Nov 28, Nov 29. The "flaring" / interaction matches up perfectly with the time of ISON's perihelion! This is it!



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:29 AM
link   

BobAthome


that is a very good question.!

wow,,




is it the back-ground, of stars one would normally see?

or is it "full of stars" ??



No so remarkable if you ask me. SDO was deliberatly focussing off-center for the ISON pass. Normally this telescope would be aimed straight at the sun. Now it has been pointed directly into the sun for a couple of years so I guess that "second sun" is simple baked into the lens or CCD of this telescope or the lens filter was designed this way.

Peace



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:41 AM
link   

Nootropic
reply to post by boncho
 


We actually can't check


The video for perihelion (at that angle and filter) only starts at 18:13:59, we have no earlier footage from it.

Speculative at best?





posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 09:12 AM
link   
reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Not "screen burn", more like a processing glitch.
Here's a side-by-side comparison of the HMI colorized magnetogram view for the same time period, and the artifact in question:



edit on 1-12-2013 by sageturkey because: New Photo



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 09:46 AM
link   
reply to post by boncho
 


What exactly do you mean to say?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 10:42 AM
link   
How do we look upon bumping at ATS?

I think there are some big questions to discuss, for example, if ISON was not made out of rock, water, ice, or anything else containing oxygen, then what was it made out of?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 11:54 AM
link   
Sorry for the triple post, but come on guys, look at this.



This is during ISON's perihelion! The times match!



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:16 PM
link   

Nootropic
reply to post by boncho
 


We actually can't check


The video for perihelion (at that angle and filter) only starts at 18:13:59, we have no earlier footage from it.

Speculative at best?

Here's the footage from the "Approach" portion. cometison.gsfc.nasa.gov...
The strand is there before ISON reaches that position, and looks like it's been there for a while.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Nootropic
 


How many comets were flying past on April 1st 2013?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 04:46 PM
link   

wildespace

Nootropic
reply to post by boncho
 


We actually can't check


The video for perihelion (at that angle and filter) only starts at 18:13:59, we have no earlier footage from it.

Speculative at best?

Here's the footage from the "Approach" portion. cometison.gsfc.nasa.gov...
The strand is there before ISON reaches that position, and looks like it's been there for a while.


My issue with that is it's a different angle and a different filter, but I see what you're saying.


boncho
reply to post by Nootropic
 


How many comets were flying past on April 1st 2013?


I'm not sure, why do you ask?

The video doesn't bring much new information but I sort of reorganized my thought so maybe help understand the larger picture as I see it? I understand that we all have different opinions.


edit on 1-12-2013 by Nootropic because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-12-2013 by Nootropic because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 10:10 PM
link   
The answer to this picture:



The Solar Dynamic Observatory has more than one camera.
You can go here, as the woman in the youtube video did, to check out the images that they have captured.

BUT

Although the cameras normally look straight at the sun, as comet ISON went around the sun the AIA camera was directionally offset to have a look somewhat sideways to see where the comet would be.

BUT

The HMI camera was not offset, and continued to look directly at the sun.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the SDO page linked above and see for yourself. Late in the day of November 28th (GMT), all the AIA images are offset for a while. But you can see all the HMI images remain looking at the sun.

One of the "options" you can select is a "composite" of both the AIA and HMI images.
Normally they are aligned. but for that brief period when they are not aligned.

Thats what the woman had selected. The composite of two cameras not pointing at the same place.
Try it for yourself.
See for yourself.
Go to the link, select a date range of
2013-11-28 18:00:00
2013-11-29 00:00:00
and select the last option in the dropdown box of "Composite AIA 171, HMI Magnetogram" then play the movie, step through the frames etc...

edit on pmSundayfpm1 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 12:56 AM
link   
reply to post by alfa1
 


An iteresting idea from another thread,, and i quote

"Even nasa is looking into warp drive technology. Its not about the speed and getting to other plantes/solar systems etc. Its about warping space-time around the"

unquote

like the picture??

Is this the warping space-time ..because of the exposed Core of Ison?
we see this because a fragment,,is the warping space-time?

what is that core made of, anyway?




quote from here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

just an additional thought.

ohh and u seem to be running the technical part, as well as the theoretical,, so thought id ask.



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 01:13 AM
link   

Nootropic
My issue with that is it's a different angle and a different filter, but I see what you're saying.

Same filter as in OP's video, "171". It's just been processed and colourized in the video, it seems. The different field of view still catches that area of the Sun where the strand is located, otherwise I wouldn't have posted that image.



new topics

top topics



 
9
<<   2 >>

log in

join