Would a Video Game oriented Operating System be useful?

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posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 08:26 PM
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Would a Video Game oriented Operating System be useful for developers?




posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


SteamOS

Yes, yes it would be.

~Tenth



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


Probably not, and it would probably be to the detriment of games to do such a thing. It would stifle new ideas and creativity.

What they need is a big blank screen and the words "okay Go!" in the center.



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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tothetenthpower
reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


SteamOS

Yes, yes it would be.

~Tenth

Personally I'm not as excited about the SteamOS as most people seem to be. Steam is a highly commercialized company and I think they do more to lock down the area of gaming then they do to open it up. For a start their client can be a memory hog and it becomes harder to mod games when everything is stored in some stupid folder like "/Steam/SteamApps/common/" and if you don't have an internet connection you can't play some games. The SteamOS may be a bit more reasonable in some of these areas but I'm not hopeful.

What I really want to see is a truly open source console design. Remember, a console is just like a mini-computer with a custom operating system on it. I want something that anyone can go out and buy the list of cheap and common parts and put it together themselves (or buy a pre-assembled one if they cannot be bothered building it themselves). And it could run a truly open source Linux operating system made by a non-profit open source team instead of a company like Steam.
edit on 17/10/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 

xbox 360 has a custom OS build specifically for DirectX graphics processing. It has similar apis that the windows OS has for threading and low level calls but is not based on it. I believe PlayStation uses CellOS.



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Every SteamOS kit sent with a SteamBox (name pending) is also a developers kit.

Entirely open source as from what I've been told.

I do agree steam as a client currently has it's issues, but those are mostly due to the way that Windows stores information and how it forces you to write paths to access that content.

~Tenth



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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tothetenthpower
Entirely open source as from what I've been told.

Well that's a plus but it's still going to be based around the Steam client, which isn't open source software is it? So in my opinion that still isn't anything like what a truly open source gaming OS would be like.



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


the OS will run steam natively but its not built around the steam client itself.



posted on Oct, 17 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


Hey there!
I'm not sure if anyone has said anything about this yet.
I was wanting an OS like that, and SteamOS, isn't out yet, so I have been passing my time with SUSE Studio.

If you look here OpenSUSE, you can read up on what SUSE is, in more detail, but for a quick explanation, You can look below!


OpenSUSE is a Linux based OS, and has a couple ways to set it up.
You have the original openSuse 12.3, which I have no experience with. I think it has no desktop and is the developer jumping off point for creating a Linux based system.

Then, KDE, which is like Windows for Linux. It has the taskbar, a start button, with a few key features that make it stand out. I also have no experience with that.

GNOME, has blwon me away! It has multi-dektop layering, that allows services to overlap on different levels, and increases peformance. The memory usage is awesome, and it glides through it's app selection. It's so simple and it just works.

These OS, are developed by a growing team looking for members who can code and debug, and they maintain their own OS using an online repository set up in their user interface. You get "Packs" from their website, Like the "Games 12.3" pack, will have games that you can find online, and other things like Steam, or PlayOnLinux, which makes the files think you are on another operating system. You can get tools from their website, to get Mac files or Windows executable programs, and run them on it.

But as my premise, SUSE Studio is a compiler that lets you choose your packages, and add your own kernels, scripts or packages. You could have nothing from their site, and compile an OS with their tool. It's quite astounding the amount of time this FREE OS, must have taken to make, and what they are planning to do with their next release in 30 days. They even have their free version of Microsoft office(Libre Office), Photoshop(Gimp), and 3D Modelling(The oh so popular Blender that "Wreck-it Ralph" Was made on).

SUSE Studio

Now for your OP. Of course! That's like asking if an orange tree would make oranges better than an apple tree. There are no, none that I can think of and feel free to tell me otherwise, strictly gaming OS, which I have been trying to accomplish using openSUSE GNOME 12, at least for myself.

The information is in the links if you have any questions!

My Opinion is If you want to make your own from scratch, you will need a Team. The Windows team took 9 years to make Windows 7, through extensive trial and error. But that was to make their own...

UNIX is from the 70's and it's still used today by developers because of raw power and flexibility, and honestly, I'm fed up with Windows. It's so buggy. OpenSUSE has been a blast, and you can even try it without installing it through a "Live CD", which basically acts as your windows files, but on start up, either take the CD out or boot from hard disk.

Happy Gaming!



posted on Oct, 18 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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Ahhh, Steam...oh how I loathe thee at times...Personally, I'm not going to be using the Steam OS. I currently have a gaming rig already set up on my widescreen television downstairs. I didn't need a special operating system to do it. Windows and a HDMI cable worked just fine.

Considering the SteamOS main page says this:



Finally, you don’t have to give up your favorite games, your online friends, and all the Steam features you love just to play on the big screen.


And I can already do that without reformatting to a new and untested OS....PASS.

Besides, do you really want the same developers as Steam running your entire computer's processes when it's also associated with gifs like these? lolol

gifaday.blogspot.com...
Rather potty mouthed version: www.funnyjunk.com...



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Steam is a software platform from Valve.

Steam is not a company.



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by Mythfury
 


No they are already using Unix clones for operating systems now in video games. Nintendo uses a Unix clone and so does Apple with IOS.

What I am talking about is a operating system that is built from the ground up(around a linux kernel) for video games consoles,video game handhelds,arcade boards,gambling devices,and gaming on smart phones and not desktops,laptops or servers(unix is primarily a server and mainframe OS).



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 09:07 PM
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John_Rodger_Cornman
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Steam is a software platform from Valve.

Steam is not a company.

Good point. Must have been tired when I wrote that post.



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 12:51 AM
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The SteamOS is what I have been asking since Xbox came out running Windows 2000. Back then I wanted a thinned out version of Windows that was optimized for running games. I wanted Windows XBOX. I wanted to build custom computers and load them with WinXbox. If SteamOS is what it takes to move gaming to Linux then lets go. I have had a 10 foot experience since windows NT 4. My first computer I bought parts for and built from scratch was a NT server box with dual CPU's. I have had a PC as a media-center since NT4. I understand that the console people don't want to mess with custom PC setups but in my opinion I believe there are more that do. I am all for the SteamOS to usher in Linux gaming to the masses. The number one reason I hear all the time that holds back Linux users is that Windows has the games. I see SteamOS knocking down that wall.
edit on 12/2/2013 by staple because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2014 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by staple
 


good posts.

Valve is really doing well with its steam platform.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


The OUYA gaming console www.kickstarter.com... based on Android, is hackable or at last very user configurable - Only 99 bucks - (www.amazon.ca...=vg_feature_Ouya?pf_rd_m=A3DWYIK6Y9EEQB&pf_rd_s=center-1&pf_rd_r=0M0CN31EH11DGEM4P7ME&pf_rd_t=1401&pf_r d_p=1570575882&pf_rd_i=1001028261) It's designed to enable developers to make cheaper games but that will compete with the big boy consoles.

It's interesting they did this with Android. It could be done with Linux way better than Steam and or Steam OS. Many games not designed especially with Linux in mind can work in Linux. The technology Valve uses to pull this off (other than OpenGL) is unknown to me. I do think Steam/SteamOS will help bring more "windows" gaming into Linux. There is a list of games that work with Steam OS and it has some great AAA titles like the Half Life 1 and 2 series, Left for Dead 2, Metro Last Light to name a few - though Valve stress's the system is not designed for the purpose of playing Windows games. steamcommunity.com...

Then there is the list that has the other "windows" games but these are games that work through Steam running under Linux www.steamgamesonlinux.com... and it includes games such as Dead Island, Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Alien vs. Predator 2010. That' s pretty awesome I think.

Valve doesn't use Wine that i know of .. someone correct me if I'm wrong. Steam's big problem in my book is I already own half of those games because i purchased them retail. I do not want to purchase a Steam copy all over again to make them work with Linux.

I'm looking forward to the day all windows games can be made to work with Linux. This is when Linux will really take off for developers to design operating systems and games for other devices.
edit on 7-2-2014 by JohnPhoenix because: spelling



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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Mythfury
reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


Hey there!
I'm not sure if anyone has said anything about this yet.
I was wanting an OS like that, and SteamOS, isn't out yet, so I have been passing my time with SUSE Studio.

If you look here OpenSUSE, you can read up on what SUSE is, in more detail, but for a quick explanation, You can look below!


OpenSUSE is a Linux based OS, and has a couple ways to set it up.
You have the original openSuse 12.3, which I have no experience with. I think it has no desktop and is the developer jumping off point for creating a Linux based system.

Then, KDE, which is like Windows for Linux. It has the taskbar, a start button, with a few key features that make it stand out. I also have no experience with that.

GNOME, has blwon me away! It has multi-dektop layering, that allows services to overlap on different levels, and increases peformance. The memory usage is awesome, and it glides through it's app selection. It's so simple and it just works.

These OS, are developed by a growing team looking for members who can code and debug, and they maintain their own OS using an online repository set up in their user interface. You get "Packs" from their website, Like the "Games 12.3" pack, will have games that you can find online, and other things like Steam, or PlayOnLinux, which makes the files think you are on another operating system. You can get tools from their website, to get Mac files or Windows executable programs, and run them on it.

But as my premise, SUSE Studio is a compiler that lets you choose your packages, and add your own kernels, scripts or packages. You could have nothing from their site, and compile an OS with their tool. It's quite astounding the amount of time this FREE OS, must have taken to make, and what they are planning to do with their next release in 30 days. They even have their free version of Microsoft office(Libre Office), Photoshop(Gimp), and 3D Modelling(The oh so popular Blender that "Wreck-it Ralph" Was made on).

SUSE Studio

Now for your OP. Of course! That's like asking if an orange tree would make oranges better than an apple tree. There are no, none that I can think of and feel free to tell me otherwise, strictly gaming OS, which I have been trying to accomplish using openSUSE GNOME 12, at least for myself.

The information is in the links if you have any questions!

My Opinion is If you want to make your own from scratch, you will need a Team. The Windows team took 9 years to make Windows 7, through extensive trial and error. But that was to make their own...

UNIX is from the 70's and it's still used today by developers because of raw power and flexibility, and honestly, I'm fed up with Windows. It's so buggy. OpenSUSE has been a blast, and you can even try it without installing it through a "Live CD", which basically acts as your windows files, but on start up, either take the CD out or boot from hard disk.

Happy Gaming!


Which is better Ubuntu,Knoppix, Xandros or OpenSUSE?

I hear alot of people praising Ubuntu.



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


This "video game OS" is primarily designed to for video games(including,handhelds, consoles, arcade boards etc) exclusively. Its not a desktop OS(like linux+GNU is ) nor is it a "windows games emulated on a unix-like platform".
Its built entirely to accelerate video game programs(and supporting programs) and make it easier,cheaper,more functional and faster to make video games.
Windows,Macintosh,and Linux/GNU were not designed to exclusively run a small set of specialized computer programs like a video game or streaming media player.
They were designed for a multitude of different programs.
edit on 14-2-2014 by John_Rodger_Cornman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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John_Rodger_Cornman
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


This "video game OS" is primarily designed to for video games(including,handhelds, consoles, arcade boards etc) exclusively. Its not a desktop OS(like linux+GNU is ) nor is it a "windows games emulated on a unix-like platform".
Its built entirely to accelerate video game programs(and supporting programs) and make it easier,cheaper,more functional and faster to make video games.
Windows,Macintosh,and Linux/GNU were not designed to exclusively run a small set of specialized computer programs like a video game or streaming media player.
They were designed for a multitude of different programs.
edit on 14-2-2014 by John_Rodger_Cornman because: (no reason given)


I take it this "Video game OS" is fictional, simply a hypothetical topic for discussion? (or do you have some real OS in mind)

The thing is such an OS is still limited by the hardware you choose to use it for. It could not be true cross platform. It would have to have a version tailored to each "handhelds, consoles, arcade boards etc" If you don't run it from Windows or Linux ( most games even for consoles and android Phones are designed on PC then ported to the phone or console) what system would you run it on?





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