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Do you have a bug out bag? What's in it?

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posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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So now have my wife on the same page as me that something is going to happen pretty soon. We have been discussing options for bugging out, and what we would need to survive for a short period of time. We know where we are going to go, we know what weapons we will have. So my question is really what you would take and why? Is there a resource you use to plan your retreat?

Thanks all!




posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by haarvik
 


I think it really depends on your situation. From you post it sounds like you might have a building in mind? In which case you won't need to build shelter. Maybe you have gas so you don't need to make fire. Maybe it is near a river so you won't need to improvise water. You have weapons, so you can hunt for food.

I feel like the bug-out-bag is more for people who need to survive "on the lam". There are numerous threads about what people think are the best items to include. One thing is for sure though... bring lots of tampons



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by haarvik
 


It should be tailored for you and your needs. Don't build someone else's pack.

But some things I have learned:


  • Focus on items that serve more than one purpose, e.g., a knife
  • Keep it simple, don't pack a magnesium solar-powered fire starter, or cotton balls soaked in Vaseline when you could just throw in a Bic lighter.
  • Consider its weight. Put it in a pack and carry it. A lot.
  • Think about real life. Do you really want to camp out? Or just be the guy that still has some cash when the ATMs shut off?
  • And FFS, don't just throw it in a closet and forget about it. Keep it with you 24/7.


One specific item I do want to recommend is a extra pair of socks. Trust me.

edit on 10/8/13 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:13 PM
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There is no magic BOB formula unfortunately. Depends who you are, where you are, what you know, what you have planned.

Some basics though...

One is none for important items. Two is good. Three is better.

Dual purpose items. The more a thing can do, the better it earns its place.

Practice with it. Carry it. Hike with it.





edit on k121410bpmTue, 08 Oct 2013 12:14:12 -0500 by khimbar because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:17 PM
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WE all have bug out bags here.

- Distilled water packets for 5 days.
- Food bars for 5 days. (not for me, I can't eat them, but for the family).
- Change of clothes for winter and summer. (also extra socks and underware)
- Candle and matches.
- Toiletries (small soap, toothpaste, comb, small shampoo)
- An extra pair of sneakers hanging off the back.
- Empty canteen also hanging off the back.
- A hat in a side pocket.
- 1st aide stuff (asprin, bug bite, off, bandaids, etc.)
- Thin sleeping bag and also a 'space blanket' (silver and can fold up very small)
- Small individual waterproof puptent. (I have half, my husband has the other half)
- Knife (a good one).
- Mosquito netting for over the hat/head.
- Gloves.

ETA .. I forgot .... we all have a compass and a whistle on the outside of our bags as well.

Also - the change of clothes .. the pants have draw strings because your weight will change
depending on the amount of food you are able to get ahold of. If you pack pants, make
sure they have a draw string and side pockets ... cargo pants.
edit on 10/8/2013 by FlyersFan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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I usually try to cover essentials only. I first need a way to clean water...so iodine tabs a filter straw and a small metal canteen type thing to boil in. The last will also allow for broths to be made or water heated for cooking as well. Next is a multi tool and machete because well sometimes you need tools. You could swap the machete for a small axe but the axe doesn't cove as many functions and I wouldnt be making big fires or shelters while being mobile. Ammo definitely gets a good weight allotment as well as medical supplies (don't forget a universal cleaning kit dirty guns tend to have problems when you need em most). Personally I'd rather have a kit equiped to deal with serious trauma like gsw and broken bones than extra food and water. Nature will provide enough to sustain yourself you may not be full and fat but alive and moving.

I also would want a small solar charger for tablets/smart phones. Now most people will say theyd be useless but I say you can store a ton of written knowlege maps and other media geared for survival and rebuilding my life. Devices stored battery removed of course. Thats about it other than maybe a change of clothes probably one set for cool and one for hot with one on me and one stowed. Aside from that I'll be adding an ultra light hammok tent and probably an ultra light sleeping bag you know the ones that compress down to a tiny pouch and weighs ounces.

My whole plan or strategy is to be as mobile as possible and head for the coast hopefully to snag a boat and get a little distance between me and most of the worlds people. Im envisioning an island somewhere in the Caribbean...not the popular ones but the small ones devoid of tons of vacationers. May not be perfect but I know for sure mobility will be key.

I also will travel with a .40 S&W, Su-16 for longer ranges, and a tactical 870 for urban breaching and the like. Hence the reason for space for ammo. Ammo would be stacked heavy on the 5.56 and .40 and light load of 12ga. Figuring I'll need more of the other for defense hunting and such and they cover all the rolls of a shotgun better except for breaching and possibly building clearing while scavenging if possible.

ETA: I always forget to add things like a good knife, shoes fit for mud rain and long walks/run, a poncho and a few trash bags (big black ones).
edit on 8-10-2013 by RickyD because: (no reason given)


This is my bag which has been customized with additional pockets on the outside attached by molle (I love that stuff)
My BOB
edit on 8-10-2013 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I do have access to a building but it will take some time to get there, especially if I am trying to avoid being detected. I try to think of things I can carry as well as what can be packed in the event I can use ground transportation. I am now in the process of learning old school techniques especially in food preservation. I think in a SHTF situation, those who can do things old school will be the ones who survive long term. Knowing what you need in the short term is important, but knowing what to do long term can make the difference in whether you survive or not. Just kind of getting ideas from others so I can sort through things to be a sanity check so I don't miss anything.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:39 PM
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-Bic lighters
-Antibacterial bar soap
-Potted meat
-Lard
-Bleach
-Vitamins
-Hunting Knife
-Shotgun(yes, it is on side of bag)
-Naproxen
-Needle/thread
-Vasoline
-Water
-Heavy duty Trash bags
-Headlight and batteries



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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Rather than make an exhaustive list again how about I just post a link to my
thread about what's in mine: www.abovetopsecret.com...

The biggest change is my pocket cooker is gone and replaced a biolite stove which you can charge your cellphone with.

Check the links, some of the items are less expensive than you might think.

If you have a partner you might want to consider a pair of mobile radios.
edit on 8-10-2013 by Asktheanimals because: added comment



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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Consider dehydrated water. Much lighter.

www.amazon.com...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381256992&sr=8-1&keywords=dehydrated+wate r

or

www.amazon.com...=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381257072&sr=8-2&keywords=dehydrated+water

edit on 10/8/13 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:34 PM
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AnonymousCitizen
Consider dehydrated water. Much lighter.

www.amazon.com...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381256992&sr=8-1&keywords=dehydrated+wate r

or

www.amazon.com...=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381257072&sr=8-2&keywords=dehydrated+water

edit on 10/8/13 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)


LOL

That reminds me of that radio station that got in trouble for alerting listeners that there was Dihydrogen monoxide found in the water as an April fools joke.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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Condoms



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


Wow, really constructive. Way to contribute...NOT!



posted on Oct, 10 2013 @ 07:32 AM
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Here's my thoughts.
You don't need a BOB if you have a gun.
Go ahead and pack all the things the stranger with a gun will need.

Conspiracy believers just don't look at all the angles.



posted on Oct, 10 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by haarvik
 


There are many good threads on ATS about bug-out-bags.

Here's the newest additions to mine; I try to add a couple things a year.

x1 - ~$20 - Unbelievable Pocket Chain Saw Portable Camping - (amazon.com listing)
x2 - ~$20 - LifeStraw Personal Water Filter - (amazon.com listing)
x1 - ~$15 - Emergency Survival Garden Vegetable Seeds Non-GMO Heirloom Seed Bank Pack Set - (ebay.com listing)

Seems like they'll come in handy.




khimbar
There is no magic BOB formula unfortunately. Depends who you are, where you are, what you know, what you have planned.

Some basics though...

One is none for important items. Two is good. Three is better.

Dual purpose items. The more a thing can do, the better it earns its place.

Practice with it. Carry it. Hike with it.


Some good advice here.. I'm always hiking with my BOB, and I consider myself ready for the day that I have to put it on my back and brace a SHTF scenario.

Regards,

-AA





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