A Blind Man Describes His Perspective of Nature (The Sun, The Sky, The Universe, etc.)

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posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 02:11 AM
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It's very interesting because to a blind person, they don't "see" things so they don't see the relationship of one object from another. There is no real sense of "distance".

What if, as human beings, we are limited in senses that we can't even imagine? People may think of "psychic abilities" but imagine if that is not the real thing? What if, us claiming that "psychic abilities" is something full and complete, is like a blind person feeling the warmth of sunlight claiming that they know "light", and there is something even greater that we cannot even imagine?

It may sound far-fetched but if the entire world were blind, something like "distance" , or "clouds" blocking out the sun but "comets" not, would sound like a ridiculous idea.





posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by arpgme
 


I liked the video.

You know, I was thinking about something similar to this today. If you ever watched Falling Skies, there are aliens that communicate through radio waves. So essentially it gives them telepathic abilities, except there is a scientific explanation behind the phenomena.

If you look at a scale of where our visible light waves are you would see it is more of a spec compared to the frequency of the rest- such as gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet, etc.

How far fetched would it be for anyone or anything to take advantage of these other frequencies? Not far if you ask me.

They say it would take years of yelling for the amount of energy emitted to be transformed into heat energy that would warm a cup of coffee. To me that means we use a very efficient way of communicating verbally to one another. And if you could produce radio waves then it should still have the same fundamentals; efficiency.

So I don't try to be skeptical about this matter as much as others are since I understand the science behind the idea.



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 02:43 AM
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What a lovely man that guy in the video is....

To listen to him and to hear his perception of what he thinks things look like is amazing...

The funniest part of the video to me was when he was describing the Grand Canyon, 'It's just a big hole in the earth, right? Why do people go to look at a big hole in the ground?'....

Awesome, thanks for posting.......



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 05:20 AM
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This got me thinking, how would you explain to someone who was born blind what the colour blue looked like. Impossible?



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 06:27 AM
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Reminds me of this guy, Esref Armagan, who is blind but can draw and paint using perspective. In the video they put him in a fMRI while drawing and his (a man w/o eyes) visual cortex is lit up like a Christmas tree.





posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 07:25 AM
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reply to post by arpgme
 


It's both enlightening, and sad, to hear this man speak.

He definitely puts an interesting perspective on things (the sky just being a big vast emptiness, the Grand Canyon a big hole in the ground), but it really made me realize that he lacks a perception of what natural beauty is. Which, in turn, made me realize just how much of my perception of beauty was based on things like color and shape, over physical analysis. The Grand Canyon, to me, like space and the sky, aren't impressive for their size (something I noticed he brings up a lot), but for their inherent natural beauty: the colors, the shapes, and the sheer wonder of seeing them.

The video really leaves me torn. On one hand I'm trying to understand his perspective, to imagine the world the way that he does; at the same time though, because of my predisposition to visual beauty, I am unable to fully disconnect from a world of color and shape, which he lacks when he analyzes these things.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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Wandering Scribe
reply to post by arpgme
 


It's both enlightening, and sad, to hear this man speak.

He definitely puts an interesting perspective on things (the sky just being a big vast emptiness, the Grand Canyon a big hole in the ground), but it really made me realize that he lacks a perception of what natural beauty is. Which, in turn, made me realize just how much of my perception of beauty was based on things like color and shape, over physical analysis. The Grand Canyon, to me, like space and the sky, aren't impressive for their size (something I noticed he brings up a lot), but for their inherent natural beauty: the colors, the shapes, and the sheer wonder of seeing them.

The video really leaves me torn. On one hand I'm trying to understand his perspective, to imagine the world the way that he does; at the same time though, because of my predisposition to visual beauty, I am unable to fully disconnect from a world of color and shape, which he lacks when he analyzes these things.

~ Wandering Scribe


That is more or less what I was thinking when watching the video....

To try and have an understanding of his perspective, wow, how do you do that?



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by Wandering Scribe
 


While the guy seems to be one of the most happy people I've seen in a long time, I found it hard to not feel bad for him a bit.

Never having seen anything, I could imagine it would be difficult to understand how certain sights like the grand canyon can be beautiful. Having that type of beauty and awe inspiring material removed from your ability to perceive just seems sad. But then again, he quite literally doesn't know what he is missing, so it probably seems much worse to us, than to him.

The thing I wonder about, if you can see, and then loose your sight, you can still approximate in your mind what your surroundings look like. You have ideas of scale, of distance, etc that can be translated by feeling or being told of your surroundings. You can kind of draw a picture in your mind of what a room or area looks like.

But if you have never seen at all, it makes me curious what he "sees" in his mind's eye. I'm sure you could remember "10 steps in this direction means there is a wall" but I wonder if he is able to construct a virtual mockup of his environment in his mind in the way that people who have history with sight can.



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by arpgme
 


thanks arp that was interesting

you know.... - i think, that our ability to cán see, is the same time our greatest Handicap

- an Awareness [entity] is projecting a [false] Model into our brow
and our eyes see our "reality" according to that model





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