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Jury convicts Nidal Hasan on all charges in Fort Hood shooting

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posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I find and all expenses paid by the taxpayer for life in prison to be immoral while those victims, and their families will be forced to pay for it.



You may be right, but if we are to have a rule of law society, then we have to accept such things.

The real burden isn't the lifers. The real burden is the churning turnover created by the criminalization of non criminal actions (we can all think of at least 1, i am sure). This is what has made us the most imprisoned nation on Earth. Especially the war on drugs. We have proven that the US Government has been involved in the spread of drugs to make money to support their black budget ops. On the other side, the politicians line their pockets by investing in the prison industrial complex, not to mention the arming of civilian police with military items (and feeding their investments in that industry as well).

You want to complain about getting screwed? Start there. Once we get THAT worked out, we can figure out what to do with the remaining few criminals who really have wronged someone.




posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Don't see how that applies to Hasan.

Hasan did what he did wasn't a victim here.

People needs to stop trying to make him one.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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Perhaps this is just my twisted sense of humor but i would prefer long term medical testing on guys like this as opposed to life in prison or execution.

I say let em be of some service to humanity, who knows what we could learn by openly experimenting on death row inmates and if the company doing the testing picks up the tab for his 'care' then everyone wins.

Personally i would value the life of a rabbit over this guy...if we can test on them then i think we should be able to do the same kind of tests on him.

Maybe i am the only who gets a bit of a chuckle from the idea of doing cosmetic testing on certain inmates before sending them back to gen pop.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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It's debatable as to which is less costly, keeping someone imprisoned or the unbelievably tedious and unending appeals processes.

Not to mention the fact that Hassan wishes to be put to death as it will formally install him as a martyr and inspire similarly twisted individuals.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Yeah teh system is junk, don't get me wrong. When it comes to what kind of crimes an land you in jail or worse, 100% agreement. We should start there and fix things.

In the meantime though, I'm not interested in paying for this kind of person to enjoy a better life than the millions of homeless people or under privileged youth and low income folk.

I would sooner pay a homeless man the 80 thousand dollars a year to do drugs and get drunk in downtown LA than to some mass murderer's care.

At least the bum would contribute to the economy with his spending.

~Tenth



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


It is kind of interesting when you think of it that way.

what are your thoughts on putting kidnappers in jail? Immoral?



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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A military jury has convicted Army Maj. Nidal Hasan


Just a reminder MILITARY here so civilian arguments don't apply.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by Djarums
 


I have a question on that cost comparison and I really don't know the answer...which is why I ask. I'm not sure if you're a Vet or not, but know a number of staff have said they are, so here goes?

Is the military system as prone to the endless appeals system as the civilian one?? I know the civilian side can let a man live on Death Row for 20 years or more, filing appeal after appeal on everything down to what T-shirt someone wore in the court gallery (for those wonder..Yes..that has actually been a real basis of appeal). Is the Military limited on # of times a guy can have a case looked at?



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:52 PM
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As far as being on topic, I say go all Jack Pershing on him. Walk him to the wall. Bring out the firing squad. Walk out a pig. Shoot the pig. Each man dips a bullet in the pigs blood and chambers a round. Then Hasan gets his Blind fold. Sorry dude, no virgins for you.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by wrabbit2000
 


It seems:


Appeals in courts-martial

There are procedures for post-trial review in every case, although the extent of those appellate rights depends upon the punishment imposed by the court and approved by the convening authority. Cases involving a punitive discharge, dismissal, confinement for one year or more, or death will undergo automatic review by the appropriate military Court of Criminal Appeals. Further review is possible to the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.
Intermediate courts of criminal appeals

If a service member is court-martialed and they feel that the result was unjust, then the service member can submit their case to the convening authority, which is the commander (usually a general or admiral) that originally established the court-martial panel. This is similar to asking a civilian governor for clemency or a pardon. After such clemency requests, the service member may also submit their case for review to the Court of Criminal Appeal for their branch. These courts are:

Army Court of Criminal Appeals
Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals
Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals
Coast Guard Court of Criminal Appeals

These Courts of Criminal Appeals can correct any legal error they may find, and they can reduce an excessive sentence. The accused will be assigned an appellate defense counsel to represent him or her at no cost before the Court. Civilian counsel may be retained at the accused's own expense.
Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces

From these intermediate courts of appeal, a service member, if sentenced to more than a year confinement or to a punitive discharge or dismissal may also petition the nation's highest military court - the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces (CAAF).[5][6] This court consists of 5 civilian judges, appointed for a fifteen-year term, and it can correct any legal error it may find. Appellate defense counsel will also be available to assist the accused at no charge. Again, the accused can also be represented by civilian counsel, but at his or her own expense. Review by the CAAF is discretionary and a limited number of cases are reviewed each year. For the year ending September 1, 2009, the CAAF had 1,002 cumulative filings and disposed of 1,033 cases. Of these 1,033 cases, 46 were disposed of by signed or per curiam opinions and 987 were by memorandum or order.[7] (By comparison, the US Supreme Court issued signed 46 opinions in 2009.[8])
Request for Pardon

As a final measure of appeal, a convicted service member may also petition the President of the United States for a reprieve or pardon under the Constitutional authority granted in Article II, Section 2.


Source

Under what I'm reading here it seems that the appeals are very limited and cannot go beyond the final one.

~Tenth



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 



I thought this case was pretty cut and dry as well. From what I have read, he was guilty without a doubt.

But I find it funny that we find him guilty of murdering people....and then will most likely kill him for it.

Hypocritical? Just as immoral?


Ummmm…no!

The people he murdered in cold blood were not guilty/convicted of murder; Nidal Hasan most certainly was.

What do you propose we do? Should pay to keep him locked up for the rest of his miserable life?

He’s going to get death…that's what he dealt and that’s what he’ll get in return.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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This guy should have been declared a terrorist from the onset, and his victims get all the rights they are due.


What does it matter what you call someone? He was found guilty so it doesn't matter.
Why are conservatives so obsessed with what other people label things?



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by CB328
 



Why are CONSERVATIVES so obsessed with what other people label things?


Labels??






edit on 23-8-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by CB328



This guy should have been declared a terrorist from the onset, and his victims get all the rights they are due.


What does it matter what you call someone? He was found guilty so it doesn't matter.
Why are conservatives so obsessed with what other people label things?



Because the fort hood shooting was classified as 'work place violence' that classification denied all those effected their duly earned rights.

THATS WHY.


The Fort Hood shooting was a Jihadist[2] mass murder that took place on November 5, 2009, at Fort Hood near Killeen, Texas.[1] Nidal Malik Hasan, a Jihadist serving as a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others.[3][4] It is the worst shooting ever to take place on an American military base.[5][6] Several individuals, including Senator Joe Lieberman,[7] General Barry McCaffrey,[8] and others have called the event a terrorist attack.[9][10] The Department of Defense and federal law enforcement agencies have [11] classified the shootings as an act of workplace violence.


workplace violence
edit on 23-8-2013 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


I have no problem saying that I don't know what the best solution would be.

The biggest part of me says that he should be put to death. But there's a smaller part that questions whether or not it's right to do so.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Military or not, my Creator imbued all humans with the same rights. And no man (or general) has legitimacy in taking that away.

For what its worth, I don't see this clown as anything other than a moron. But Cameron Todd Willingham has removed any arguement for the death penalty for me. Forever.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 





Military or not, my Creator imbued all humans with the same rights. And no man (or general) has legitimacy in taking that away.


Yeah well sorry to disagree Hasan didn't have the right to murder people, and if the state decides to end him.

They have my support.

Can't use that argument after the blatant disregard for life he clearly demonstrated.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 



I have no problem saying that I don't know what the best solution would be.
I bet if one of his victims during that senssless rampage was your child you’d know what the best solution is.




The biggest part of me says that he should be put to death. But there's a smaller part that questions whether or not it's right to do so.
Well, I agree with the ‘biggest part’ of you.


I find it hard to have compassion for people who show no compassion for others. I REALLY find it hard when they take the life of innocent people. That’s just not acceptable. I’m willing to grant his wish for death.



edit on 23-8-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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Why dont they exchange him for American Servicemen , that are still being held by, Jihadist's.
It is war, after all.
And that could ,only be , any kind of good too come of it.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 



Why dont they exchange him for American Servicemen , that are still being held by, Jihadist's.

It is war, after all.

And that could ,only be , any kind of good too come of it.



Jimmy Carter? Is that YOU??


While I understand where you’re coming from, I disagree that we should negotiation with these scum. As soon as we do any kind of exchange we’ve given their tactics legitimacy and will have inspired them to take more prisoners.



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