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Jury convicts Nidal Hasan on all charges in Fort Hood shooting

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posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 




I bet if one of his victims during that senssless rampage was your child you’d know what the best solution is.


You got me there! I have a hard time with issues like these because my emotional response conflicts with what I consider a more "common sense" approach.



I find it hard to have compassion for people who show no compassion for others. I REALLY find it hard when they take the life of innocent people. That’s just not acceptable. I’m willing to grant his wish for death.


I will reply to your staement with a quote from Lord of the Rings....perhaps it gives you a better look at where I am coming from.


true courage is not about knowing when to take a life, but when to spare one.




posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:45 PM
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My 2 cents : Execute all those who kill. Period.


But Nidal was American. So treat him as American law would treat any other mass shooter. Just don't execute some while excusing others.

If America attends to mass shooters as mental patients, then treat Nidal in the same way.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 



I will reply to your staement with a quote from Lord of the Rings....perhaps it gives you a better look at where I am coming from.

true courage is not about knowing when to take a life, but when to spare one.



I would spare someone on the battlefield who surrenders even though I know that person is responsible for the death of Americans in combat.

I would not spare a cold-blooded thug murderer that killed innocent, unarmed people.

One is a soldier – the other is a coward murderer. That’s the difference in this case.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by sk0rpi0n
My 2 cents : Execute all those who kill. Period.


But Nidal was American. So treat him as American law would treat any other mass shooter. Just don't execute some while excusing others.

If America attends to mass shooters as mental patients, then treat Nidal in the same way.


Seems reasonable to me!


That's exactly what's happening in this case. He got a fair trial, he'll get sentenced, then he'll get to appeal. He's going to get the same treatment every scumball killer gets.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


i hope u can tell that too the Servicemen there holding,,,,,,,,,Kissenger,,is that u?,,its how real wars are fought,, out in the open,, not under a rock.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


You have a good point, Seabag. I believe that the morality paradox still exists in situations like these and we may disagree a bit, but at least we can talk about it intelligently.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


No one is saying he had a right to kill anyone, only that the state doesn't have that right either.

Just because it is official doesn't make it legitimate. "Official" just means that mob rule is in charge.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by seabag
 


i hope u can tell that too the Servicemen there holding,,,,,,,,,Kissenger,,is that u?,,its how real wars are fought,, out in the open,, not under a rock.


They don’t need to hear anything from me….I’m nobody.

Everyone who has taken the oath of enlistment and memorized the Code of Conduct understands the risks. Here are some key points...



Article I - I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

Article II - I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

Article III - If I am captured I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and to aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

Article IV - If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

Article V - When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

Article VI - I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.



edit on 23-8-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by sk0rpi0n
My 2 cents : Execute all those who kill. Period.


But Nidal was American. So treat him as American law would treat any other mass shooter. Just don't execute some while excusing others.

If America attends to mass shooters as mental patients, then treat Nidal in the same way.


Yeah well that guy was a military officer, and is being treated under military law how they call it is up to them.

He got his due process, though denying it to his victims.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


And the reason why they believe every word,,is because they know that there country,, will move heaven and earth, and ,will bring them home,,from said enemy.,,dead or alive.
but as someone once said,, "its your job too make sure the other guy dies for his country,", but i say, if there is one amounst you who has gone missing,, will the good commander, do all in his or her power too bring home any lost Soldiers?



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 



And the reason why they believe every word,,is because they know that there country,, will move heaven and earth, and ,will bring them home,,from said enemy.,,dead or alive.
Our country's policy has been not to negotiate with terrorists. There's a difference between negotiating for the release of prisoners from a defeated enemy (such as Japan after WW2) and negotiating with terrorists. The latter shouldn't be expected.




but as someone once said,, "its your job too make sure the other guy dies for his country,",
Exactly.



but i say, if there is one amounst you who has gone missing,, will the good commander, do all in his or her power too bring home any lost Soldiers?
We (our leaders) should do everything they can to ensure the safe return of our troops. There will always be troops ready, willing and able to rescue our captured but those orders don't always come. I know a little bit about this because I served in Nasiriyah with 2/8 and we assisted in getting back Jessica Lynch. Many are not so lucky...and she was VERY luck because Nasiriyah was hell on earth.

I think releasing terrorists in exchange for our troops (like Israel has been known to do) is crossing the line. I'm sure I'd feel differently if it was my arse in a terrorist's prison camp but....I decided long ago I would not be taken alive. All you can do in that situation is fight hard, expect the worst and pray for the best.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower

Here's the question. Is a person, like that, worth 80 to 120 thousand a year of tax payer money?

That's what it will cost, every year, to keep that man in jail, properly fed and provided all the wonderful benefits of the prison system, when you're in 'protective' custody, which he would no doubt be in.

IMO it's not worth it. There are some things, that deserve death. Mass murder is one of them.

~Tenth


This is a guy who opened fire on unarmed fellow soldiers in US to (in his words) "protect Muslim insurgents" abroad.


Coward. Traitor. Murder. If he had such a problem with US he shouldn't have joined the US military.

Yes, the death penalty is warranted.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 

Thoughts?

I wish they could send him to Black Dolphin Prison.


That or, "will he blend"



Will he?
edit on 23-8-2013 by Lysergic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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I was very glad to hear that this verdict came out as it did,.
This guy deserves the end of his life for what he did,.
Lets hope it all follows through,.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


"pray for the best"
i'll accept that.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by BobAthome
reply to post by seabag
 


"pray for the best"
i'll accept that.


The people you'd least expect will bust out the most heartfelt prayer when the SHTF......

I wouldn't have survived without my faith in God....I believe that. I don't care who flames me for saying that or thinks less of me because of it.



edit on 23-8-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


I don't care who flames me for saying that or thinks less of me because of it.
"for i will bring u before judges and Kings,, and i will be with you"
ohh a shtf stuff as well,,, lol,,seems little easier,, than Judges and Kings,,



posted on Aug, 25 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
~Thoughts?


He's guilty. He's disgusting. I think that the court should give him what he craves ... death.
Send his sorry backend to 'allah' .... our courts should arrange the meeting for him.
(and I'm against the death penalty except in extreme cases ... and this is one of those !!)



posted on Aug, 25 2013 @ 06:55 AM
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Originally posted by sheepslayer247
I'm just asking...if we put him to death are we any "more moral"?


I"m against the death penalty unless it is necessary for self defense reasons. I fully believe that this is a case where it is in our own self defense to execute the S.O.B. If he is kept alive, other terrorists could use him as a springboard for more terrorist attacks (like they could threaten to blow up a school if Hasan isn't released or something). And if he is kept alive, he will spout more jihad nonsense that will inspire other killer-idiots. He won't shut up. So I believe that to execute him is a matter of self defense. So even though I'm usually against the death penalty ... I think that this is a case in which it is justified for self defense reasons.



posted on Aug, 25 2013 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


Thoughts?

Nice to see a jury return the most logical result from considering the evidence.

We shall see if sentencing is also fitting and logical or some version of NWO/globalist hogwash.

I suppose we shall also see if the O pardons him for some irrational reason . . . as a co-religionist, perhaps. Hopefully, even the O would not make such a hideous mistake.

Whether this case involved any black-ops setting the perpetrator up as a way to further insert chaos and conflict between interest groups in our culture or not . . . the perpetrator certainly filled that role very well.

It seems to me that the perpetrator's religion was more than sufficient motivation and guide for him to carry out his murderous binge.

Whether dark human forces added to that tweak, ideation . . . is mostly a moot issue. He was sufficiently wound up to do the deed regardless of the forces doing the winding.

One does wonder, occasionally, however . . . about exactly what factors contributed to such horrible acting out.



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