God and Man; The meaning of "Incarnation"

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posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by BlueMule
Much of what the Bible says, it says between the lines. That is where the hidden wisdom of God is found. It

That's what I've been saying.
You project your fancies onto the Bible to make it mean anything that pleases you.

I'd rather look for the meaning intended by the writers.

And if you want to continue claiming that the Bible calls Jesus a mystic, you need to back it up with something detailed and specific.
What you have offered so far is vague and evasive. Or is that the mystic way?




posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by DISRAELI

I'd rather look for the meaning intended by the writers.


Then you're a fool for ignoring the scholarship of the comparative fields. Only a cross-cultural approach can highlight the invisible threads that bind the writers together, under the surface.

Contemporary dogma can't do that. Too myopic.


And if you want to continue claiming that the Bible calls Jesus a mystic, you need to back it up with something detailed and specific.
What you have offered so far is vague and evasive. Or is that the mystic way?


All I need to do is point you to classes in comparative mysticism, comparative mythology, comparative religion and let education do the rest.



Good luck.

edit on 11-7-2013 by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2013 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by BlueMule
 

Then you don't have anything specific to back up "What the Bible says about Jesus is that he was a mystic".
I thought not.
So, as I said before, the Christian religion is based on what the Bible does say about Jesus.



posted on Jul, 13 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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The significance for the church of Christ being "made man" is illustrated by the "high church" custom of kneeling during the recital of the Nicene Creed at the words "came down from heaven" (and getting up again at the words "and was crucified").
I enountered this in "high" Anglican services, and I assume it was borrowed from Catholic practice.
Presumably this is expressing reverence towards the fact of the Incarnation and his time spent on earth.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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It's important to redress the balance on this question, because popular Christianity seems too anxious about the challenge to the divinity of Christ to be able to acknowledge his humanity and treat it as seriously as it needs to be treated.
The popular phrase "Jesus is God" is symptomatic.
I remember once drawing our curate's attention to a popular chorus which was on diaplay from the overhead projector at the time;
With respect to the line "Hands that flung stars into space, to cruel nails surrendered", I pointed out that the concept was Monophysite, and he felt compelled to admit that I seemed right.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


God has previously refuted the christian doctrines so no matter how many roman higher ups decide that jesus is God and there is a trinity blah blah blah they can only ignore what is called the actual words of God in the Old Testament.

God says he is one and there is no other.
God says that he does not share his glory with anyone else.
Case closed.

This information obviously only applies to those that believe in the God of Abraham as christians say they do but then they ignore everything that Abrahams God said in order to accommodate the doctrine that was invented by the romans.

Its not that I mind christians making up a new religion, its just agonizing watching them try to make the square peg of christianity fit into the circle shaped hole of Hashem's own words.



posted on Jul, 15 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by ALLDRAFT
 

The teaching is based on the New Testament.
You can't blame "roman higher-ups" because they had nothing to do with developing the doctrine;
The Roman church was NEVER in charge of the church as a whole, and "papal power" as we understand it today didn't even begin to exist until about a thousand years after the death of Christ.
I've done a thread on that issue as well, and there will be more to fill in the gaps;
The springboard of papal power



edit on 15-7-2013 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by ALLDRAFT
 

P.S. The Christian faith accepts and agrees with the teaching that there is only one God.
The first line of the Nicene Creed is "I believe in one God...".
However, the doctrine of the Trinity follows on from the doctrine of the Incarnation, so the doctrine of the Incarnation needs to be understood first.
That's why this thread was about the Incarnation rather than the Trinity.





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