It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Top 10 reasons why people are moving to Texas

page: 2
7
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:09 PM
link   


Since more people are moving to Texas rather than California its a reasonable assumption that most people agree with the views of Texas which is contrary to the liberal viewpoint.
reply to post by Hopechest
 


You know what they say about assuming.......

And no, it is not entirely reasonable to assume such a thing. Wherever you find a large influx of Cali transplants, you will find a more liberal slant in the local population. Not 100%, but enough to notice. People tend to take their viewpoints with them. If you are assuming that Cali is a "blue state" and is more in line with Obama's values, then you have to also assume that those viewpoints are being dragged with them when they relocate. They relocate for financial reasons, not for political ones.

It took me a long time to shed my blue state values, and the only reason I did that is because of this current administration's behavior, which made it impossible to align myself with it. I went from being a life-long Democrat to being an independent. I want nothing to do with either party, and I'm fairly confident that this is a national trend, not a local one.

Political science is flawed indeed, if you do not take the psychology of people, or the reasons for mass migration, into account.....which, apparently, you haven't. There are all kinds of people in all kinds of places, and one cannot place them in a box just because a poli sci professor encourages you do to so.




posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:09 PM
link   
I think cost of living would be the most important factor in deciding where to move.No state tax is a good start though!I was making $16 an hour on Long Island in 2001 and barely made it from paycheck to the next much less actually save anything.And NY state tax at that time was 81/2%.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Hopechest
 


I will tell you this. I have never, not once, ever, moved from one location to another because of *political* views. To even say that is ludicrous. I've moved for better employment opportunities...cheaper housing, better schools...but NEVER because of political views.

I don't see how you, in any way, equate people moving clear across the country for political views.


Based on your *political* views. I can only assume you see the entire State of Texas, as Obama traitors.

Des



edit on 1-6-2013 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by Hopechest
Haha, I gotta say this because its making my fingernails itch not playing devils adovocate.

Ok here goes:

"Yea and I bet there aren't any of them gays or blacks or stupid ass demOcrats there neither?"

LOL


I have no idea what you're getting at, or why you're baiting this thread with such nonsense, but I suggest that you get some anti-fungal cream for those itchy nails of yours.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by FissionSurplus



Since more people are moving to Texas rather than California its a reasonable assumption that most people agree with the views of Texas which is contrary to the liberal viewpoint.
reply to post by Hopechest
 


You know what they say about assuming.......

And no, it is not entirely reasonable to assume such a thing. Wherever you find a large influx of Cali transplants, you will find a more liberal slant in the local population. Not 100%, but enough to notice. People tend to take their viewpoints with them. If you are assuming that Cali is a "blue state" and is more in line with Obama's values, then you have to also assume that those viewpoints are being dragged with them when they relocate. They relocate for financial reasons, not for political ones.

It took me a long time to shed my blue state values, and the only reason I did that is because of this current administration's behavior, which made it impossible to align myself with it. I went from being a life-long Democrat to being an independent. I want nothing to do with either party, and I'm fairly confident that this is a national trend, not a local one.

Political science is flawed indeed, if you do not take the psychology of people, or the reasons for mass migration, into account.....which, apparently, you haven't. There are all kinds of people in all kinds of places, and one cannot place them in a box just because a poli sci professor encourages you do to so.



Of course you are correct on a number of issues. But political scientists tend to focus on trends, not individual statistics for accuracy.

If you have a very liberal state and people are moving out of it and you have a very conservative state and people are moving to it, it is indicative a trend.

If you travel to Oregon from California you will see no "welcome to Oregon" sign yet when you get to the border, on the opposite side of the freeway there is a "welcome to California" sign.

This indicates a trend.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:20 PM
link   
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Really? No Welcome to Oregon Sign.....what is this, I wonder.....



Des



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Really? No Welcome to Oregon Sign.....what is this, I wonder.....



Des


I think you put that up just to prove me wrong.

And that isn't on the main freeway unless I am mistaken.

In fact, I believe that is a sign coming in from Washington......Major False Flag!
edit on 1-6-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Hopechest
 


I don't have to prove you wrong...you do that quite well yourself. I'm still waiting for your response on why you think people are moving to Texas due to political views.

Des



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:37 PM
link   
I had a terrible time in Texas!
Help wanted signs everywhere, but almost all applications were online so you couldn't look an employer in the eye.
A lot of places actually seemed to also not welcome outsiders. It almost seemed to me like if you were not Texan, or wanted to work construction, you were going to have a hard go at it.

The rest of the problems were not those kind of issues,but jobs there are hard to come by because there are 100's of people applying for the same jobs. Texas may be booming, but everyone is competing for those jobs, and it makes it very hard without a degree or friends with contacts.

I did love the weather though once I got used to it and the storms were awesome!


You just hang out inside with an air conditioner until the sun goes down, and if you ever move there...
The biggest thing I learned was...

DO NOT STICK FINGERS INTO HOLES!!
Everywhere you look there is a little hole, and in that hole is a great big bug just wanting to take a bite out of your finger! I don't know how many times I got yelled at for trying to poke holes and see what was in them...

edit on 1-6-2013 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:42 PM
link   
I'll stick up here in the Upper Peninsula. We don't have hurricanes or rattlers to worry about, we don't really need air conditioning if there are trees near the house. We have plenty of worc up here in the backwards, just look for it on garbage day. Everyone is happy here as soon as summer finally shows it's face. Funny how something like summer which is so short is appreciated so much here.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:55 PM
link   


If you travel to Oregon from California you will see no "welcome to Oregon" sign yet when you get to the border, on the opposite side of the freeway there is a "welcome to California" sign.
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Perhaps Oregon is cheap. Perhaps the signs were stolen long ago and Oregon has no intention of replacing them. This is not indicative of a trend, any more than no border fence between Texas and Mexico means that people are free to come and go. Whether they do or not is another matter, but one cannot use the absence of something as proof of intent.

Oregon is a unique case in that they didn't want any transplants, but were certainly ready and eager to take any money that came their way. However, I have met as many people from Oregon who moved to California, as I know of Californians who moved to Oregon.

Whatever trend you're harping on already happened decades ago. Citing current trends, and not old-hat ones, might better serve your purpose.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 12:58 PM
link   
reply to post by Darkblade71
 


Where exactly did you go in Texas that you had such a terrible time? Location is everything, and this state is abnormally huge. What jobs were you applying for?



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 01:07 PM
link   
reply to post by FissionSurplus
 


I was in Burleson.

I came out of Alaska and was hoping to keep going in grocery,nothing fancy really, I was a dairy manager in Alaska, and moved down there with my wife as her family lives in that area. I did supposedly get hired for HEB grocery, but they never called me back after telling me they wanted me as a seafood specialist. *shrug*
When I inquired, they had no clue.

5 days after I left, after 100's of applications,and 8 months, home depot called, but I was already back in Minnesota. I think the timing was poor actually as everyone was freaking out over the economy and had death grips on their jobs.

it worked out though, as I got the best job ever now



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 01:16 PM
link   
There is often a noticeable difference between the people and lifestyle of rural Texas and the urban areas of the big cities. Laid back vs rat race. Depends on how a person wants to live.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 02:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Darkblade71
 


Okay, so you were south of Fort Worth then. Burleson may have had an abnormal influx of people desperate for work at that time, as you intimated.

I will say, though, that the employers in Texas are less concerned about the happiness of their employees, and the rights of employees, than in California....but that is true in many states that are less regulated, in a current economic climate of desperation and high unemployment. This speaks more to our capitalistic system run amok, than it does to a region of the country.

Certain jobs will always have the welcome mat laid out for you, no matter what....the medical field, teachers, prison workers, and law enforcement. Other jobs, such as retail, customer service, generic office jobs, and fast food, have more applicants than they know what to do with.

When I was job hunting for just regular old office jobs, I didn't have much luck. However, when I pulled out my degree and applied to work in a mental health clinic, I had no problem whatsoever.

In any case, glad that you found a job you love in a region of the country you prefer to be in.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 02:15 PM
link   
Holey moley
I thought everybody in Texas lived like the Texas Hoggers and drove wierd ole bush machines with M16s hung in the back window,figured they ate mostly barbequed steak, barbequed ribs and barbqued hog.
Doesnt everybody get two weeks off in the spring to go and round up the cattle herds?
I hear they get strayed a lot cause of all the oil rigs drilling in close proximity.....
Yep, Miles and miles of oil rigs and cows.
and miles and miles of nothin..but miles and miles



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 02:35 PM
link   
reply to post by FissionSurplus
 


Yeah, I am glad too. when I was leaving Texas, at the bus station, I met a guy who's wife does the hiring for the prison system and he told me if I ever wanted to go back, they could get me a job as a prison guard. I'd do that if I needed to. Certainly sounds exciting in a scary kind of way!

edit on 1-6-2013 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 03:37 PM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


I here ya friend, born and raised in Michigan ( i'm a troll tho ) . However I have lived in California, Texas , Mississippi, and Oklahoma during my late teens early twenties. I ended up back in good ole' Michigan.

The weather is to warm in all the other places for a cold blooded guy as myself, except California I lived in Monterrey lovely weather almost all year. However on manners and friendliness I would say Mississippi/ Texas takes it. Unless you live in a rural area like I do then folks are pretty nice.

Besides things are looking up for Michigan finally, I have no reservations about Texas being plan B tho I'll just have to buy the most extreme air conditioner money can buy if I do go there
.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 03:48 PM
link   
reply to post by Destinyone
 
Now Des you know they're not moving to Texas because of political views. Everybody knows folks are moving to Texas in droves in the hopes of being one of my neighbors. They heard about my peach cobbler and sweet tea- they just can't resist!



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 05:27 PM
link   
People may not move TO a state for political reasons; but they may be less open to moving somewhere because of sociological / political reasons.

I have turned down several offers outside of Texas in the last couple of years (one this spring) because the benefits in money were not worth the costs: much more expensive housing, bias against home-school, fewer civil rights, etc.


And brisket fajitas.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join