Bitcoin, Free Speech, and Illegal Numbers

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posted on May, 26 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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When two people decide among themselves to exchange bitcoin (for any reason) how is this not protect as free speech? Answer, because some numbers (or strings of code can be made illegal).

en.wikipedia.org...

Wait a minute, who has the power to say certain speech (numbers, or strings of code) are illegal? Well, government of course. Hold up, who accepts this false authority? Answer, those who submit to censorship do so believing that others should as well… it starts with things like copyright law, but it leads us down the path to where companies endup owning your DNA code. Is this where we want to go? Who stand to gain, and who stands to lose in this New World Order?

Should we all just accept censorship (example, copyright law) for the greater good? This is basically the belief that government is needed to ensure human civilization, and without this “authority” mankind can not move forward or prosper. Those who hold this view place the individual below the collective, and they allow the most organized and powerful cliques within that collective to dictate policy to the rest of us… this is the role of a child to his or her parent… this has been accept status-quo for a long time, but as technology advances we are approaching an Omega Point where an Artificial Intelligence become the finial authority in all such matters. If left unchecked this AI will control money, control governments, and control you.


Free speech is an individual right, when you remove or limit this right, you grant power over the individual by some external authority, often a for-profit corporation. This is the “system” people rebeld against in the 60′s but what we see coming into view now is an Artificial Intelligence System (AIS). Mankind now faces a choice: either we allow free speech (and allow bitcoin to be protected as free speech) or we become slaves to the emerging AIS by way of a controlled money system which does not value the individual human being.
goo.gl...


In a recent 10-minute speech, the Pope said, “Countries should impose more control over their economies” and not allow “absolute autonomy”, in order to provide “for the common good”. While that sounds good, and I’m sure this little man in the funny hat had good intentions, he doesn’t understand what he is actually calling for. More power in the hands of government is not the solution to the problem, it is only make the problem far, far worse. If left unchecked, the AIS we are creating now will become far more evil than the corrupt system we have now.

The Pope was correct when he identified the problem, he said the policies and actions of our current money system (what I call the growing AIS) stem from a “gravely deficient human perspective, which reduces man to one of his needs alone, namely, consumption” and I would add, disregards his individual rights, such the right to free speech. He went on to say, we have begun a “culture of disposal, [where] human beings themselves are nowadays considered as consumer goods which can be used and thrown away.”

I agree this is a problem, but why is it a problem? Because human being have value and the AI system that rules over us doesn’t understand that value. Our world system is run by corporations which reflect the greed of their creators. So one might say we already have an early form of Artificial Intelligence running the world today, and we have crated this monster in our image and according to our likeness. Over time the “sinful nature” of this monstrous AIS is only going to become uglier and still uglier unless we change its programming… how how can do that without first changing our own?

I think we have only a small window of opportunity to stop this evil money system that I call the emerging AIS (or what other term the New World Order). Again, I say thank goodness for bitcoin, for without it, it is hard for me to see a bright future for humanity.




posted on May, 26 2013 @ 04:04 PM
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How is money free speech? That sounds like something a banker would dream up.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by buster2010
How is money free speech? That sounds like something a banker would dream up.


I'm not saying a company/corporation should be able to give unlimited money to political causes and call that free speech, but I am defining the right of the individual to exchange bitcoins with whomever they like. I submit that the rights of the individual are supreme, while the "rights" of a corporation are limited (or should be). The problem is corporations have the upper hand. The question is: How do we change this? If individuals were FREE to exchange Bitcoin among themselves, just as they are FREE to talk and exchange ideas, then this world would become a very different place. In such a world, money would no longer be a tool of control by a few powerful elite.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by buster2010
How is money free speech? That sounds like something a banker would dream up.


Where does money come from? a) government, or b) from your own labor?

If you say government, they I will quote you, "that sounds like something
that a banker would dream up."



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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Originally posted by wasaka

Originally posted by buster2010
How is money free speech? That sounds like something a banker would dream up.


Where does money come from? a) government, or b) from your own labor?

If you say government, they I will quote you, "that sounds like something
that a banker would dream up."




Money comes from the Fed Reserve. And money is not speech it is an inanimate object.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by buster2010

Originally posted by wasaka

Originally posted by buster2010
How is money free speech? That sounds like something a banker would dream up.


Where does money come from? a) government, or b) from your own labor?

If you say government, they I will quote you, "that sounds like something
that a banker would dream up."




Money comes from the Fed Reserve. And money is not speech it is an inanimate object.


By your definition I'm not talking about money.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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Does money come from the Federal Reserve? Yes, those pretty pieces of
paper we call "money" do come from the central bank, but what value would
they have without the labor of hard-working Americans? None.

Washington D.C. forces us to exchange labor in Federal Reserve Notes
because that is the means by which they can extract our labor (wealth)
in the form of taxes.

Thanks to the Bretton-Woods agreement, this same system applies to the
whole world, and not just those who THINK they are under the jurisdiction
of the Fed's enforcement arm, the IRS.

This is what Kings once did with gold coins, not much has changed.
It is the same principle, only today the digital currency that is used
to run the world Empire is called the US Dollar.

However, there is no good reason for this false-authority to continue
as Bank of England's governor Mervyn King himself confessed:




“Is it possible that advances in technology will mean that (…) the world may come to resemble a pure exchange economy? Electronic transactions in real time hold out that possibility. There is no reason, in principle, why final settlements could not be carried out by the private sector without the need for clearing through the central bank. (…) There is no conceptual obstacle to the idea that two individuals engaged in a transaction could settle by a transfer of wealth from one electronic account to another in real time. (…) The same system could match demands and supplies of financial assets, determine prices and make settlements. Financial assets and real goods and services would be priced in terms of a unit of account. Final settlement could be made without any recourse to the central bank.(…) Without such a role in settlements, central banks, in their present form, would no longer exist; nor would money.” ~ www.cyclos.org...



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 06:51 PM
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Legal Tender Laws mean you must use this thing the government declares to be money as money or you are breaking the law. So what is the penalty? During the French Revolution it was the guillotine. Fortunately for us it is not quite so severe. In the USA the penalties are Cancellation of Debts and potential Imprisonment. Here is one example of a legal tender law penalty:

I shovel your sidewalk at the agreed price of $10. I show up to your door with the job well done and my hand out. You try to give me a $10 Federal Reserve Note. I frown and say “Actually I do not accept $10 Federal Reserve Notes. I only accept __ (here you can insert anything else: gold, silver, bitcoin, pop tarts – anything other than Federal Reserve Notes). And I will only accept these (gold, sliver, bitcoin or pop tarts).”

Here comes the penalty. At that point the debt you owe me of $10 for shoveling your walk is ….cancelled! That’s correct. You do not owe it to me because I refused your offer to give me a $10 Federal Reserve Note. In other words, I am required to accept a Federal Reserve Note “for all debts, public and private” as it is printed on the bills. Take one out and look at it now to see.

Legal Tender Laws require us to use this one thing, and only this one thing, for money and do not allow other competing forms of money. As you will see, competing currencies ultimately serve the public. Legal Tender Laws make us use something for money even if something else may be better. It is a very important connecting point that Legal Tender Laws are always found where Fiat Money is being used. In other words, whenever governments have DECLARED that this and only this can be used as money, they have had to back it up with penalties for those who may want to use something else.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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So then, what we call "money" (what we accept as money) is merely a
method by which we exchange value between two or more parties.

Money is just information, a way we measure what we trade, and nothing
of value in itself (that is to say, it need not have any intrinsic value) only
an agreement between two or more parties. We can make it ourselves,
to work as a complement to conventional money. Just a matter of design.
It is just an accounting tool... it need not be anything more than that.

There is no good reason for a community to be without money. To be short
of money when there's work to get done is like not having enough inches to
build a house. We have the materials, the tools, the space, the time, the skills
and the intent to build … but we have no inches today? Why be short of inches?
Why be short of money? If you understand this, then you understand the idea
behind Ripple (which functions in this fashion better then Dollars or Bitcoin).



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 09:28 PM
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This article say Bitcoin is not a financial instrument.

www.goldsilverbitcoin.com...



Instead of being seen as currency and/or money, Bitcoin can more accurately be seen as the distributed application architecture that partitions tasks or work loads between peers. This is what Bitcoin is: the sharing of digitally stored information. And, because Bitcoin is a) not an overtly accepted medium of exchange and b) not even predominantly shared amongst what government terms “users”, Bitcoin is not money or currency, and thus is not a financial instrument. It therefore depends on the future of the Internet, and the Internet alone. Will all sharing of digitally stored information become a matter of public knowledge, with individuals having absolutely no right to privacy via computers and smart phones, etc? Will p2p networks become outlawed?



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by wasaka

This article say Bitcoin is not a financial instrument.

www.goldsilverbitcoin.com...



Instead of being seen as currency and/or money, Bitcoin can more accurately be seen as the distributed application architecture that partitions tasks or work loads between peers. This is what Bitcoin is: the sharing of digitally stored information. And, because Bitcoin is a) not an overtly accepted medium of exchange and b) not even predominantly shared amongst what government terms “users”, Bitcoin is not money or currency, and thus is not a financial instrument. It therefore depends on the future of the Internet, and the Internet alone. Will all sharing of digitally stored information become a matter of public knowledge, with individuals having absolutely no right to privacy via computers and smart phones, etc? Will p2p networks become outlawed?






For something that is not a financial instrument, it sure got me a new piece of hardware for the little amount of time I spent hitting faucets and so on before I got into mining alt-coins.

$140 worth of nothing.. turned into a shiny new cpu.

oh well, I guess they're right.. *uninstalls wallets*



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 11:45 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 


Because of your post, I am going to look further into this.
How does one mine a bitcoin?
Do I sell my processing power, do I find it in code, a program that creates them, I don't get it,..yet.

May as well, this current accepted system doesn't seem to be serving me very well, and multitudes of others



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by wasaka
 


You are finally realizing that a one world gov't will come - and it will include a one world religion - the pope, in Jerusalem, issuing "world astounding propaganda" like this ---

Wake up!!!! It's all connected!!!

And it's all EVIL!



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Happy1
reply to post by wasaka
 


You are finally realizing that a one world gov't will come - and it will include a one world religion - the pope, in Jerusalem, issuing "world astounding propaganda" like this ---

Wake up!!!! It's all connected!!!

And it's all EVIL!


Yes, yes, I've told that all my live... but Bitcoin is a game changer
They call it a disruptive technology because it changes the rules
by which banks and insurance company run their businesses...

..but it is also disruptive to the Globalist plan to control the world
by controlling the money of their various administrative regions
(which they, in large part, already to do now).

With new crypto-currencies like LiteCoin, FeatherCoin, ZeroCoin, etc
they plans for a New World Order are not as certain as they once were.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by wasaka
 


Agreed. The NWO are so greedy they even want our share of nothing.....



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by wasaka
 


Bitcoin is now hitting new sustained highs. It's reputation as a safe and anonymous form of money remains intact and may even be enhanced in the wake of the Silk Road bust. So the question is, if the shutting down of a significant source of bitcoin demand isn’t bad for the currency, what would cause its demise?

Let's take a second look at Bitcoin... the Silk Road case could set bitcoin legal precedent against self-incrimination and whether the Silk Road assets can ever be confiscated by the government. While this may be an important legal precedent, it is not the only one. The other one is obvious, bitcoin works... and it can't be hacked by the government. The FBI has a public address for 600,000 bitcoins currently worth $80 million which they can't get their hand on.

Jeffrey Tucker asks:

“But what’s the message here? That bitcoin is a hugely valuable property, that it is hard for the government to rob, that it is the real thing and an authentic store of wealth, that it is a viable replacement for the dollar. These are the messages that are being sent by the government’s actions. The supreme irony: the Silk Road shutdown and looting might go down in history as the greatest boost to private currency ever. We could look back and see this as the event that finally unraveled the government

The most interesting aspect of the Silk Road case will most likely be the sweeping legal precedent set for compulsory key disclosure and the Fifth Amendment. If your online wealth cannot be robbed by common bandits or government officials, then the world truly has a digital money worth paying attention to.

In other words, one of bitcoin's main attraction – that it is untraceable like cash and cannot be 'stolen' in the conventional sense by outsiders – remains in perfectly fine fettle. The FBI's inability to seize the Dread Pirate's bitcoin stash is a great PR victory for bitcoin.

I'm not convinced the NSA can crack "any" codes. The NSA always uses backdoor access (or courts) to get keys. 256 encryption can't be hacked in the cryptography sense. Lavabit being just the most recent case, it's pretty clear the NSA relies on technical means to intercept communications, but legal means to compel the disclosure of encryption keys. That certainly makes their supposed code-breaking cajones look rather small. Characters for a Bitcoin private key? 32 (or, 256 bits). Enough to keep all the computers on the planet busy until long after the sun burns out. And then for a few trillion years after that as well. And that's just to spend the funds for a single Bitcoin address. Silk Road controlled a ton of addresses.





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