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Alaskan Soldier Gets 16 Years For Selling Secrets to Russian Spy Who Was Undercover FBI Agent

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posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:44 PM
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I haven't seen this anywhere and just came across the notification on www.globalincidentmap.com... Listed as:

Type: Terrorism And Related Court Cases
City: Fort-Richardson, AK (US)
Date: 2013-04-15 06:46:00
Severity: Severe

16 years for a potential terrorist act. Seems fair I guess. But what if he wasn't American? More maybe? Maybe a disappearing act?

But still, this guy is painted as a White Supremacist and I don't get the connection. Did he think his actions were going to be directed towards non-whites only?
Alaskan soldier gets 16 years for selling secrets to Russian spy who was undercover FBI agent

An Alaska-based military policeman will serve 16 years in prison for selling secrets to an FBI undercover agent who he believed was a Russian spy. Spec. William Colton Millay, of Owensboro, Ky., pleaded guilty last month to attempted espionage and other counts. He was sentenced Monday and will now be dishonorably discharged. Military prosecutors painted him as a white supremacist who was fed up with the Army and the United States, and was willing to sell secrets to an enemy agent, even if that would cost fellow soldiers their lives. Defense attorneys said Millay was emotionally stunted, was only seeking attention and was a candidate for rehabilitation. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


His defense states he is emotionally stunted and deserves a chance.

My question is how did this come about? He's in AK so yes there are a lot of Russians up there but who approached who? Did he share his intentions with anyone and got set up that way? Or was this some sort of litmus test by the FBI to see if he would play along?

This is what smells like some sort of set-up:

The FBI, working with military intelligence agencies, conducted the investigation. On Sept. 13, 2011, an FBI undercover agent called Millay and set up a meeting the next day at an Anchorage hotel-restaurant. Chriswell testified that during the first meeting with the agent, Millay 'expressed his disgust with the U.S. military.' They then moved to the agent's hotel room, where audio and video recording devices were in place. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Lots more to this:

Millay said he'd work for the Russian government, and if they made it worth his while, he'd re-enlist for a second five-year stint. He also said he had confidential information on the Warlock Duke jamming system the U.S. military uses to sweep roadside bombs.

Two days after that meeting, Millay reported to his commander that he had been contacted by a Russian agent. He was later interrogated by military intelligence officers and the FBI, but prosecutors say Millay was merely trying to throw off suspicion. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Interesting tho...How far would he have gone without being spoon fed everything he needed to follow thru?

Peace




posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:46 PM
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Come find me.



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I can only hope they try to setup as many stings as they can to catch people like this.

The only thing I don't like is that the news is reporting it... so people who were once dumb enough to do this might think otherwise. They all deserve to be caught by undercover stings.

Hopefully someday we will have mindreading technology to sniff out the people that would consider this and make more refined and specific stings.
edit on 19-4-2013 by Wertdagf because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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He initially sent an email to a Russian magazine inquiring about who he should get in contact with to set up a 'spy' type scenario. The editorial board of said magazine may well have contacted the Kremlin, and they may have decided he was potentially more trouble than he was worth.

That's how I imagine it played out.. I've been watching 'The Americans', FX's excellent new series involving cold-war era espionage. If you've not seen it, I highly recommend you check it out if you're into that sort of thing.


FBI Special Agent Derrick Chriswell said Millay came to their attention in the summer of 2011 through an anonymous tip after Millay sent an email to a Russian publication seeking information about the military and made several calls to the Russian embassy.


www.theblaze.com...
edit on 4/19/2013 by Monger because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/19/2013 by Monger because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 



Two days after that meeting, Millay reported to his commander that he had been contacted by a Russian agent. He was later interrogated by military intelligence officers and the FBI, but prosecutors say Millay was merely trying to throw off suspicion.


If it smells like fish.........

Wait a minute, wrong saying!


That there pretty much says it all. He was set up, and he did the right thing, which in turn shown the criminal activities of the FBI!!!!

Can you say SET UP?



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by seeker1963
reply to post by jude11
 



Two days after that meeting, Millay reported to his commander that he had been contacted by a Russian agent. He was later interrogated by military intelligence officers and the FBI, but prosecutors say Millay was merely trying to throw off suspicion.


If it smells like fish.........

Wait a minute, wrong saying!


That there pretty much says it all. He was set up, and he did the right thing, which in turn shown the criminal activities of the FBI!!!!

Can you say SET UP?


You left off that part about how most of what he said to the FBI was BS, and he left out all of the important bits - like his contacting them, not the other way around. The only reason he reported being approached was to try and cover his ass preemptively.


Chriswell said Millay, during the interrogation, withheld information that officials already knew from the recordings. That included a claim that he didn't know why a Russian agent would contact him, his claim to the agent that he had access to Social Security numbers of people on base because of his police job and that he had sent her an earlier text claiming he had more information on the jamming system.
edit on 4/19/2013 by Monger because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by seeker1963
reply to post by jude11
 



Two days after that meeting, Millay reported to his commander that he had been contacted by a Russian agent. He was later interrogated by military intelligence officers and the FBI, but prosecutors say Millay was merely trying to throw off suspicion.


If it smells like fish.........

Wait a minute, wrong saying!


That there pretty much says it all. He was set up, and he did the right thing, which in turn shown the criminal activities of the FBI!!!!

Can you say SET UP?


That's about where I started to think the same. It seems that nothing would have happened further if the FBI didn't get involved...maybe.

Peace



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by Monger
He initially sent an email to a Russian magazine inquiring about who he should get in contact with to set up a 'spy' type scenario. The editorial board of said magazine may well have contacted the Kremlin, and they may have decided he was potentially more trouble than he was worth.

That's how I imagine it played out.. I've been watching 'The Americans', FX's excellent new series involving cold-war era espionage. If you've not seen it, I highly recommend you check it out if you're into that sort of thing.


FBI Special Agent Derrick Chriswell said Millay came to their attention in the summer of 2011 through an anonymous tip after Millay sent an email to a Russian publication seeking information about the military and made several calls to the Russian embassy.


www.theblaze.com...
edit on 4/19/2013 by Monger because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/19/2013 by Monger because: (no reason given)


Thanks for the tip. I'll check it out.


Peace



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


So, why, then, did he lie to both Military Intelligence officers and the FBI again and again during his interrogation?



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by Monger
reply to post by jude11
 


So, why, then, did he lie to both Military Intelligence officers and the FBI again and again during his interrogation?


Good question and one that can't be answered unless in the same situation. It's the White Supremacist angle that has me confused more so.

He stated he was disgusted with the US Military so why? The thing about these FBI stings is that something always seems out of sorts.

Peace



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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traitor



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by theuppergots3
traitor



A few more lines or even words might help.


Peace



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by jude11

Originally posted by Monger
reply to post by jude11
 


So, why, then, did he lie to both Military Intelligence officers and the FBI again and again during his interrogation?


Good question and one that can't be answered unless in the same situation. It's the White Supremacist angle that has me confused more so.

He stated he was disgusted with the US Military so why? The thing about these FBI stings is that something always seems out of sorts.

Peace


It's hard to attribute exceptional powers of logic and consistency to people who are simultaneously deranged and stupid, but here goes.

My guess is that he was disgusted at the US and US military because they weren't officially prejudiced against ethnic and racial minorities, and he saw Russia and its military, with some truthful justification, as bad-ass-white-guys who aren't afraid to put the smackdown against their own troublesome minorities, and place orthodox Christian Russianness explictly above others.

Of course, he is too stupid to be accepted to work for the KGB/FSB, but Dunning-Krugerlike he didn't realize this.

edit on 21-4-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-4-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-4-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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It's a little hard to tell, but the guy is not the brightest bulb. He was a Spec, which would mean E-4 after 4 years in, the normal enlistment. It said he re-enlisted for "an additional 5 years," which is an odd term, but the fact is he ought to have been an E-5 at the end of 4 years, showing that he was below the norm in terms of promotions. It's normally 3 years to E-5, and for the best it's a mere 18 months.

I don't really care of he was set-up or not, he still voluntarily offered to trade secrets for money. He got what he deserved.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


Pretty much exactly my thoughts. If he was willing to sell secrets, which he was as evidenced by his lying to the FBI after "coming forward". Not too bright of him to cast suspicion on himself.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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great read, bet their will be a movie about this in the future
, i think the judgement was fair.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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The dirtbag needs to be lined up and shot along side Bradley Manning, tratiorus jackwagon scumbags



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 08:38 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
But what if he wasn't American? More maybe? Maybe a disappearing act?


There have been a number of foreign spies that received jail time (some more, some less), but hardly a disappearing act. The one that would have received one, if anyone was going to, was Noshir Gowadia, who got 32 years. He was convicted of selling B-2 secrets to China, including helping them design a cruise missile with a smaller IR signature. He worked on the B-2 exhaust, and gave a presentation on stealth in 2003, at the same airfield the Chinese J-20 made its first flight at (Chengdu). He was born in India, and was nationalized in the US in the 1970s, and worked at Northrop Grumman from 1968 to 1986.

A Chinese engineer received 15 years for economic espionage, and another Chinese national got 24 years for conspiracy to commit espionage.

So about 16 years is right, depending on the secrets. The more valuable the secrets, or the more of them leaked, the more jail time you get. Gowadia was eligible for life in prison, but because of his age, they felt that his sentence was fair.





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