Crazy guy and his pet wolf!

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posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:35 PM
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It looks like this guy wants to be mauled!

Who in their right mind has one as a pet in the first place, especially when they already have a tiny little pug dog?






posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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Oh, my Chihuahua used to do that too.



Why do the think the dog isn't attacking him?

He knows his limitations.
edit on 1-4-2013 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Its a wolf, so its a wild, unpredictable animal



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:45 PM
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Any dog is unpredictable.

The dog I currently have is unpredictable and he's not a wolf.

Doesn't matter the breed.

All dogs are unpredictable. Given the right circumstances.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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I had forgotten how big their teeth were.
I had a wolf/husky years ago, that was the runt of the litter. I had 2 other dogs as well, that were larger than him, but his teeth were twice the size of theirs.

He never growled though, he had enough husky in him to make him really mellow.

The last half wild dog I raised was half coyote. She was such a good girl, extremely smart, good with all other animals, but couldn't be around small children.

When they're wild, or part wild, you really have to know their limits.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Wild, undomesticated breeds more-so.

Ive had friends who thought wild animals were a good idea, until they either lost another pet to it or until it attacked them or someone else. Domesticated breeds are less likely to attack than wild breeds.

Maybe he has a good bond with the animal, but its only a matter of time before its wild side comes out. They are called wild for a reason.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


I've had 2 friends who've had pet wolves. They are very intelligent animals. Bonded with their human companions in a beautiful way. Not the pet for just anyone. But, an excellent companion for a dedicated person.

They don't have a history of turning on their human companions. I think you are being a little fanatical in your attitude.

Wolves were often companion animals to early hunters.

Des



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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those eyes are too dark to be a pure wolf. even brown eyes are light brown on wolves.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


I have a different version of the same general idea. If you keep a pet wolf, make very sure you know how to kill one in one to one unarmed combat. If you know you can do that, you will never have a problem. You get to be the alpha and the wolf will always submit.

There is a big thing made of wild vs 'tame' that I find a hangover from a bygone era of big game hunters. All animals can be befriended especially if your the one providing the food supply. The video of the two lads in England that had a lion and that cute french girl in Africa playing with many wild animals without harm. Can't find them at the moment.

It is we, humans, who are wild and unpredictable.

P
edit on 1/4/2013 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Beautiful animals, but given their wild side, should not be trusted.

I can see why people could bond with them, but i dont think it is a good idea to keep them indoors. Lots of people keep tigers and lions, some get eaten, others dont. Im sure there are plenty of horror stories regarding pet wolfs.
(5.6m google results for pet wolf attack)

Things have changed since the time when we needed wolfs as companions, people have become more stupid. "look i have a wolf, how cool is that" these are the ones who will probably fall foul to their wild pet...the people who get them as a trophy pet, or a weapon.

Why have a wild pet? Why keep that wild pet indoors?
There are plenty of domesticated breeds to chose from. Breeds that all have different predictable traits.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:12 PM
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Originally posted by AmberLeaf
reply to post by Destinyone
 


Why have a wild pet? Why keep that wild pet indoors?



Love conquers all. If you love the companion wolf, why would you keep it anywhere else?

P



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


I have a Great Pyrenees herd dog. Bear weighs over 150 lbs. Actually, he weighs 35 lbs more than me. The breed is one of the least predictable domesticated dogs. They are very opinionated and have a firm mind of their own.

I can see the ancient wild blood, deep in his eyes. Still, I trust him with my life, and lives of my herd of goats.

I don't really see all that much of a difference between Bear, my beautiful, loving, strong, intelligent, opinionated dog, and a wolf. He is my companion, and part of my family pack. He sleeps inside at night, as goats are in their sheds after dark

According to you...should I get rid of him?

Des



edit on 1-4-2013 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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I have a Timber Malamute mix. He is only dangerous to Rabbits and people or other animals that behave aggressively. You can walk right up with your child in your arms. He will know if you are a "threat" and act accordingly, and he does it because it is just who he is.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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I've met a chihuahua that was about 100x more vicious if you tried to touch him when he had a bone in his mouth or any kind of food...

V I C I O U S



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


I have a Great Pyrenees herd dog. Bear weighs over 150 lbs. Actually, he weighs 35 lbs more than me. The breed is one of the least predictable domesticated dogs. They are very opinionated and have a firm mind of their own.

I can see the ancient wild blood, deep in his eyes. Still, I trust him with my life, and lives of my herd of goats.

I don't really see all that much of a difference between Bear, my beautiful, loving, strong, intelligent, opinionated dog, and a wolf. He is my companion, and part of my family pack. He sleeps inside at night, as goats are in their sheds after dark

According to you...should I get rid of him?

Des



edit on 1-4-2013 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



Uhhh NOOOOOO

I got a pyrenees too
6 month old female!



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


I have a Great Pyrenees herd dog. Bear weighs over 150 lbs. Actually, he weighs 35 lbs more than me. The breed is one of the least predictable domesticated dogs. They are very opinionated and have a firm mind of their own.

I can see the ancient blood wild, deep in his eyes. Still, I trust him with my life, and lives of my herd of goats.

I don't really see all that much of a difference between Bear, my beautiful, loving, strong, intelligent, opinionated dog, and a wolf. According to you...should I get rid of him?

Des



Its a herding dog, and you have it for herding. Its still a domesticated breed...so whats your point? It has a purpose and was bred for the job. Why would the average person need a wolf?

What are you on about "should i get rid of him"? According to me?


A wild wolf has a purpose, to survive any way necessary. Feeding him will of course keep this side from appearing too often, but let your guard down and it will have you...eventually.

Pet chimpanzees are great too until they rip you and your neighbor to shreds and bite your hands off


Not many people have wild pets here in the UK. Maybe we should all start so we become more "educated" on the matter? Im sure no one will get mauled, as you have two friends who did just fine.



edit on 1-4-2013 by AmberLeaf because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by Komonazmuk
 


Awesome! What is her name. Here's Bear when he was 6 months old...watching his goats down the hill....



Des



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


Because you are implying, because of the size of a wolf, they can't be trusted. My dog is a herd guard dog. They weren't bred for herding the goats, but to guard them from other predators. Big difference.

My dog is as big as a full grown wolf, and equal in strength. My dog's breed is known for being somewhat aloof and opinionated...kind of like a wolf..eh?

Would you feel the same if wolves were, as a breed, a much smaller animal. Is it only the size you are afraid of?

I'm not trying to be difficult with you. I just don't agree with you.

Des




edit on 1-4-2013 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


I used to live on the west coast, and it's heavily forested in many areas. Because of that, there's a lot of grey wolves in the southern areas (smaller wolf), different types of larger wolves in the mid and northern regions, and coyotes everywhere.
My wolf mix was small, 60 lbs, and the coyote mix was also about 60 lbs.

When I got my coyote/shepherd, I thought I was getting a shepherd husky cross. It was obvious to everyone, especially the veterinarian, what she was as she got older.

I never managed to get to alpha status. Equal
but never alpha. They're extremely smart, stubborn, will drive you crazy at times, but also so loving that I never had a problem. She knew when it was time to do as she was told, as long as it was in the house, or inside a fence. If she got out, she wouldn't listen.
I actually get growled at more by my Shihtzu than ever with any large dog.
I have no idea how to discipline a little dog, other than with "the look", lol.

The coyote cross was constantly cleaning herself, they're as picky as cats about grooming when they're kept in the
house a lot, so she slept with me. Good bonding, even though "experts" say to never let your pets sleep with you.
She didn't cuddle, she just stayed very close to me, always.

I think if I ever ended up with a pure wild wolf or coyote, I'd still treat them the same, you want them as house pets, to be able to spend as much time as possible with them.
The discipline has to start when they're a couple of months old. If you try later, you'll never master them.
Even though I mastered the disciple, and had an extremely well behaved pet, she always thought she was my equal.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


Because you are implying, because of the size of a wolf, they can't be trusted. My dog is a herd guard dog. They weren't bred for herding the goats, but to guard them from other predators. Big difference.

My dog is as big as a full grown wolf, and equal in strength. My dog's breed is known for being somewhat aloof and opinionated...kind of like a wolf..eh?

Would you feel the same if wolves were, as a breed, a much smaller animal. Is it only the size you are afraid of?

Des



Can Bear jump an 8ft fence with no problem? Has Bear got fangs like a wolf? Theres a lot more than size to be afraid of.

I didnt imply anything of the sort! A big dog will do more damage than say a pug....a WILD animal cannot be trusted, not a big dog


If wolves were the size of pugs, yea, id feel more comfortable around them. But given their wild side id still be cautious. Given the right circumstances you could easily be killed my a fox or feral cat. So its not all about size, more so the wild side they have...and cannot ever be taken away.
edit on 1-4-2013 by AmberLeaf because: (no reason given)





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