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CNN Announces Brown Dwarf Entering our Solar System

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posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by JrDavis

Originally posted by wildespace
reply to post by mclinking
 


Please explain the mechanism by which a body hundreds of millions of miles away would affect Earth's climate and tectonics. If you say that body has a huge gravitational pull on Earth, wouldn't it also affect other planets? Wouldn't that object have to be large enough and close enough that it would be visible in ordinary telescopes?

You lost me there, especially when you mentioned a brown dwarf in a black hole...


Yes it would affect other planets.

However every planet has a different mass. The smaller the mass the more the attraction.

Would it be visible, Depends on what the mechanism is.

Dark Energy, Brown or Black Dwarf, Another Solar system with greater mass, Etc.


Actually, the smaller the mass, the less gravitational attraction.

Large mass means a greater gravitational force.

Hence why on the moon, which is much smaller in mass than the Earth, you will only weigh 1/6 of what you do here on Earth, or like on Mars, you'd only weigh about 1/3 of what you do here on Earth. Jupiter you'd weigh 2.5 times what you do here, and if you could stand on the surface of the sun, you'd weigh 27 times what you do here.


The smaller the mass. The more the attraction to the bigger object that is further out in our solar system.

Sorry I didn't make that clear.

But i basically was saying the same thing you are lol.

If there was a brown dwarf a little bit bigger than Jupiter. Jupiter would have far less affect then the Earth would to this object.




posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by wmd_2008
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I think he means the object being attracted having the smaller mass.

Anyway there are lots of objects with a far smaller mass than the Earth and closer to the edge of the solar system than Earth, what about the asteroid belt THEY would be flying all over the place if his theory was true!
edit on 15-3-2013 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)


Right! And we are experiencing Meteors a lot lately.

However, There would have to be another variable.

Gravity is proportional to mass. Mass increases as you add energy. The asteroid belt is very cold.

Hot objects have more mass than a cold one. Cold objects have lower gravity.

This is in extreme situations. You would not knowingly notice this with everyday things.

I think it's something to experience in space.



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 11:13 AM
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Originally posted by JrDavis


The asteroid belt is very cold.

Hot objects have more mass than a cold one. Cold objects have lower gravity.






I have heard it all



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by JrDavis
 





The smaller the mass. The more the attraction to the bigger object that is further out in our solar system.


Apply this to the orbits of the STEREO satellites and you should see that your idea is incorrect.



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by JrDavis
And we are experiencing Meteors a lot lately.


Confirmation bias. There is no increase in meteors; if there were, astronomers would've reported it. Rathere, there is a greater awareness of meteors, and a lot more people are reporting them.



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by JrDavis

Originally posted by wmd_2008
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I think he means the object being attracted having the smaller mass.

Anyway there are lots of objects with a far smaller mass than the Earth and closer to the edge of the solar system than Earth, what about the asteroid belt THEY would be flying all over the place if his theory was true!
edit on 15-3-2013 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)


Right! And we are experiencing Meteors a lot lately.

However, There would have to be another variable.

Gravity is proportional to mass. Mass increases as you add energy. The asteroid belt is very cold.

Hot objects have more mass than a cold one. Cold objects have lower gravity.

This is in extreme situations. You would not knowingly notice this with everyday things.

I think it's something to experience in space.


I'm afraid that heating or cooling an object does not change it's mass. It can change it's volume or density (IE If you melt ice, but keep the water it becomes contained, the water will still have the same mass as it did as an ice cube. Heat the water to steam, but again, keep the total amount of water changed into a gas, and the mass of that gas will still equal the mass of the ice it came from, just that water and then gas cover large volumes and are less dense).

Get a sensitive scale that can show weight to at least 3 digits, like 1.000 ouces. Find some small rocks or pebbles and weigh them at room temp. Now put them in your oven set to it's highest setting (normally around 450 to 500 deg F. Let them sit in there for about an hour.
That amount of heat is not enough to change the state of the rocks from solid to liquid, but you have adding a very large amount of heat. While they are still that hot, place them on the scale again. Note that the weight has not change. If you change their mass, then their weight will change here on Earth.

E=mc^2 hold true. A mass has a certain amount of energy in it. But it's potential energy. If you add energy to the mass you don't actually change the mass. All you've done is add energy to it.

If I pick up a rock, it has a certain amount of potential energy. However, that energy is dependent upon what the rock is doing.

If the rock is undergoing fusion or fission then E=mc^2 hold's true because we are talking about nuclear forces.

However, if the rock is just sitting there, the only energy it has is potential energy. If I pick the rock up and throw it, I have now changed it into kinetic energy, which can be calculated by:

KE=1/2*m*v^2

However the kinetic energy I just gave the rock by throwing it still does not change it's mass. The only ways I can change the rock's mass is:

1) I break it up into smaller pieces.
2) I add more rock to it.
3) I've become Superman and can throw the rock so fast, it almost reaches the speed of light (as relativistic effects happen at those velocities, and the rock's mass will appear to increase to outside observers).

Heating up a rock will not change it's mass.....unless you heat it up to sublimate material off of it, or so that matter from it breaks off and leaves it. Then yes, it's mass has change. But if it then cools off....the mass will not increase just because it cooled. You have to replace the material it loss when you heated it up enough to loose that material in the first place.





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