Solar Power conversion - Anyone here done it?

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by davjan4
 


Excellent advice. My main fridge has a drawer type freezer. I would like to add a small chest freezer though too, as I'm often running out of room even with two fridge freezers. (the other one is an older stand up one). I will definitely be getting one of those meters ASAP to see where all my power is going, and make smarter decisions. Thanks so much. That ONE tip is even good for anyone whether going solar or not, just to make smarter energy choices.


For those suggesting gas options, nope, don't have gas hooked up, so can't go that route (and the wife is deathly afraid of it).
edit on 19-2-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by davjan4
 


For those suggesting gas options, nope, don't have gas hooked up, so can't go that route (and the wife is deathly afraid of it).
edit on 19-2-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)


Have you considered propane? We have some friends that have a propane generator that seems to work quite well.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by g146541
reply to post by Gazrok
 


The power companies will NEVER pay you even close to what you pay them for power.
Unless you can isolate your system, solar is pretty much a waste on grid.
The power companies rape you just like the banks.


Not necessarily. The power companies dont actually "pay" you for power you supply back in the form of a check. They do however, apply a credit to your account. For months with low usage, it accumulates and pays for months with high usage

Same friends have solar and that's how it works for them.
edit on 19-2-2013 by Kituwa because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by Kituwa
 


I have, but same issue. She's ok with having propane tanks for the grill and the horse trailer (just because they are designed that way), but she doesn't want a large tank. I think she had an issue with one somewhere in the family history, like a cousin or something, where it blew up, so just kind of put the scare into her. She won't even let me have a big diesel tank for the generator idea (or as spare gas for my truck...her truck uses regular), but she's ok with a few smaller plastic gas canisters...go figure.


Not necessarily. The power companies dont actually "pay" you for power you supply back in the form of a check. They do however, apply a credit to your account. For months with low usage, it accumulates and pays for months with high usage


That's the way I understand it as well.
edit on 19-2-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Understandable. Everyone has fears of some type.

Mine happens to be heights.




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 11:28 PM
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I did a thread awhile back on my endeavor.But it was only for an emergency back up scenario.

There are some good links and some members own systems.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Peace,
K



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 07:24 AM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


Thanks, very helpful thread. I know I won't be able to do it right out of the gate, but eventually, I'd like to be in a position to where we generate enough power to still have the same quality of life.

Priorities to power in an emergency are:

1) Well pump (need water)
2) Refrigerator (replacing spoiled groceries is expensive, and I can always try and consolidate into one fridge in an emergency)
3) One TV (for information about whatever crisis is going on)
4) One outlet (for misc. needs)

Cooking isn't an issue, have a grill with a side burner, etc.
Light isn't an issue, lots of hurricane lamps, flashlights, etc.
Cell phones can be charged using car chargers
We also have a land line if needed, with at least one non-electric phone, that may still be operational in an emergency.

The one independent solar system (within the year) will be a solar option for the electric fences. This isn't too expensive, is all self contained, and in widespread enough use that I know it is dependable.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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Biggest thing to remember about solar power is the batteries is the weakest link and ideally deep cycle sealed batteries is the way to go.

Be warned all batteries no matter the type have a cycle life most people say never run your batteries below 50%.

Another thing to remember with solar the bigger the battery bank the longer the charge time which translates to more fuel used.

Sizing the system to be the most efficiient it can will save you dollars, it will save you fuel,

For a shtf scenario replacement materials would be a major concern "specialized" solar system parts would be difficult to find replacements.

The ideal solar backup power are car batteries they aren't the best for the job but they can be replaced more easily.

A battery and any inverter and bam you have back up power of course you can chain batteries together to have more reserve power..

No doubt all things solar is going to cost and remember you get what you pay for. the more options you give yourself the mroe flexible.

Solar,wind, and solar hot water heaters for hygiene.

They do make 12 volt freezers, they also make 12 volt fridge freezers that can be found anywhere and has a wide range of prices.

That second type is small and plugs in to the 12 volt outlets in most modern cars, and trucks.
edit on 21-2-2013 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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We do get some wind too..I think about it everytime I see my weather vane fan spin...



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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I have been eyeing my wind potential also.

Here are some for under $500 that I have been looking into.

www.ebay.com...

The thing to keep in mind is how much wind speed it could handle,you don't want the thing flying apart!



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:10 AM
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Ive got my solar going finally, it is definetly an expensive project. Ive got 10 100 watt panels, going to 24 t-105 batterys run in parrell and series. with a xantrex charge controller and 2 5000 watt pure sine wave inverters. Im running just half my house right now, and plan to wire in my 2 windmills, but im still in the modifying stage of those. its definetly a good feeling to know your making your own power, and when everyone else has power outgages from storms, and other problems, mine just keeps on. I suggest everyone to do some research first and see what exactly your getting into, If i had to do it again, I would go with a more powerful system like a 24 volt or 48 volt system though. Good luck



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by Glassbender777
 


With batteries being such an expensive/important part of the solar setup, why not splurge and get AGM batteries instead of wet cell batteries? They are quite a bit more expensive, but, they will pay for themselves in the long run with cycle life.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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Over the long haul, consider replacing your HVAC with ground loop geothermal.

We're going that route when the current units age out, as part of a long-term solar conversion. Although we are also going to go gas for cooking and drying. Hot water we'll get as part of the solar conversion, the ground loop units will preheat your cold water and then a touch of sunlight does the rest.

I've often considered making a canned well supply - a bolt-together pre-designed well pump solar power unit anyone could install that would fall back to house power if the batteries ran flat. I'd like to get the well off of the mains for the most part.



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 12:13 AM
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I'm helping a buddy gear up for solar. Oddly enough it is from his chicken operation.

Here in Texas, snakes, skunks, foxes, coyotes and racoons all compete to eat the chickens. So we've rigged up a hot-wire along the top of the fence where the chickens run in the daytime, as well as another wire about 3 inches off the ground along the base of the outer perimeter of the chicken run. Racoons climb over, but badgers, foxes and coyotes will dig under.

To make matters worse, Buddy has decided that the hens are not laying because they are only getting 10 & 1/2 hours of sunlight. They need 14 hours to produce any volume. Easily remedied; just run a circuit out to the hen house, and flip the light on when you sit down to breakfast, and turn it off when you put your feet up after supper.

But he's using a chicken tractor, a portable hen-house on wheels that he moves every two weeks. The chickens can eat bugs they find in the pasture (their true food source, more than grains) and fertilize it. Of course, four weeks into it, the tractor is making progress across the pasture, and an extension cord won't reach.

So now he has a battery for the bottom wire, a battery for the top wire, and a panel to run the lights (plus a small vent fan!) set up inside the "attic" of the chicken tractor.

Installing the frames for panels on the chicken hutch started a conversation about how he'd like to run pigs behind his corn crop, with a similar system. Then we started talking about a solar powered CCTV perimeter.....

I'll share y'alls thoughts with him from this thread. Thanks.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 07:16 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 



I've often considered making a canned well supply - a bolt-together pre-designed well pump solar power unit anyone could install that would fall back to house power if the batteries ran flat. I'd like to get the well off of the mains for the most part.


That would be awesome in and of itself... Let me know if you manage it. The well pump is my biggest concern also, power-wise....



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 07:37 AM
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Biggest energy draw on any house is usually heating and cooling. Essentially you need a super insulated structure with a very efficient heat exchanger capable of delivering plenty of fresh air without thermal loss. One of those retired underground missile silos in the Plains states might be a suitable candidate. Every room on a different level with a counter balanced transport running up and down behind one wall. Can't keep the doors open between rooms with that design though.
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posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I can't imagine we're the only two people that might want that. Have to put on my design hat and see if it can be done on the cheap but really durably.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 09:41 AM
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If you are getting a power inverter, some are very badly made. Look for a good one. I think, a 3000 watt power inverter is good enough to handle all your solar panels that you would need. The only thing is then storing it in batteries. All batteries usually have life spans and are expensive, but a lot of people use golf cart batteries.



posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


To be viable, would have to be under $2000 in price range, so consider that in the design. Any more expensive, and the backup generator is simply going to be the better option.

To summarize:

1) Ability to use power from the mains (house) if not getting enough power from the panels
2) Ability to use power from the panels when it is sunny

So, in an emergency (power out), you'd still have the well pump, but only when sunny. I could live with that. If really needed, could go to the hand pump attachment.





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