The Truth about the Tax Evaders

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posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by samkent
 


im slightly off topic, but my point is the shown worths of these people, bill gates, warren buffet and so on arent always accurate.




posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by FreedomEntered
 




im slightly off topic, but my point is the shown worths of these people, bill gates, warren buffet and so on arent always accurate.

But you can't get anywhere close to 12 trillion especially if it's supposed to be in cash and gold.



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by samkent
 


But in the UK alone, they evade the taxes by a billion a year collectively. This is just the UK doesnt include the rest of the larger countries and continents.

And the 13 trillion in the article I gave is apparently a conservative estimate

Do you realise that someone who earns say 15k a year could pay more taxes than a multi millionaire tax cheat
.. This is how disproportionate it is
edit on 30-1-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Is all the drug money figured in? No. And doesn't the drug money get laundered and as such such holders of said funds are indeed willing to collect .5% in order to legitimize the funds?

I think that number is probably fairly accurate.

All governments need to call on their armed forces in order to force full disclosure by these off shore entities.



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by samkent
Here is an infographic of just how big 12 trillion is.

And this is how big it is in a digital account: "10101110100111110111101111001100000000000000"

Here is a $9 billion check. By the number of asterisks to the right of the amount it looks like there is enough room to make it out to 9.9+ quintillion.

I don't see where the article in the OP said that it was in cash or gold.


edit on 30-1-2013 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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Look at this sick article given to the public for men.

I think its along the same lines.. Lets look

Deferred salary
Using the deferred salary tactic to hide your money is one of the more simplistic strategies, yet it’s among the most effective -- because if you don’t make it, they can’t take it. Often, this path is chosen by start-up entrepreneurs who wish to keep money free for operating expenses and can afford to live on a lower salary for a period of time. This can help keep the start-up solvent through the typical growing pains, can offer tax advantages and is a token (if transparent) goodwill gesture to employees.

If you only need to hide money through short-term scrutiny, this is a beauty. No matter how closely outsiders may peer, your meager earnings are legitimate and accurate. Later, after the heat is off, you can catch up on lost time. It may not be a long-term shelter from the storm, but it’s a strong shelter nevertheless.

Out-of-state LLC
When is a person not really a person? When that “person“ is a limited liability company (LLC). In the eyes of the law, an LLC is just as good as a carbon-based life form, more or less. Actions, assets and liabilities of the LLC are those of the LLC, not you personally.

If you trust yourself, make a living trust or you could opt to get into bed with Uncle Sam… So would Murder, Inc. actually have been better off doing business as Murder, LLC? Possibly, though the latter moniker doesn’t have the same ring to it. Anyway, the beneficial extent of LLCs depends on where the business is based and, as you might have suspected, different states have different laws. When established with the proper forethought and structure, an out-of-state LLC can be a wholly legitimate way to enjoy tax advantages while you hide your money. Meanwhile, it blurs the line between person and “person.”

Equity stripping assets
If the steak doesn’t sizzle, who’s going to bother taking a bite? If your equity in an asset is reduced or minimized, it probably won’t be very attractive to anyone who’d like to relieve you of it. Depending on circumstances and jurisdiction, it may not be possible.

Often performed with -- though not limited to -- real estate, equity stripping ties up the asset in the name of another party. A bank loan would be a very costly (not to mention very public) way of achieving this, but it is one example. A more popular way to conduct this is through ownership transfer to a trusted private party. You retain access to and use of the asset, though it does not belong to you. Understandably, equity stripping requires proper execution to avoid incurring excess taxes and wiping out any advantages you’d otherwise have realized.

Living trusts
There’s no way to lose what isn’t yours, as long as you trust your trustee. In many areas, you can serve as grantor, trustee and beneficiary; it’s all you. And if you can’t trust yourself, we suspect you have greater issues to contend with than how to hide your money.

However, if you are comfortable serving in a triple role, you can legally keep the wolves at bay through this ownership intervention, which also happens to be a private matter, unlike probate. When you establish a living trust, the grantor (you) formally transfers ownership of assets to the trust; as the trustee, you are responsible for managing the assets; and as the beneficiary, you are the recipient of the assets, though theoretically, you won’t ever fulfill that obligation -- you’re hiding money, remember?

Work abroad and partner with Uncle Sam
When working and living abroad, the IRS takes a rare sympathetic stand and enables you to exclude over $80,000 in foreign annual earnings from your U.S. tax reporting. Of course, it just couldn’t be an authentic IRS production without strings attached, and they include qualification under the Bona Fide or Physical Presence restrictions. Yes, you actually have to live and work outside the good ol’ U.S. of A to get in on the action.

Granted, 80 large might not be enough for this to serve as your sole means of hiding money, but the legitimacy of the IRS’ blessing makes it hard to beat when executed in conjunction with other means of hiding money.

inconspicuous consumption
When we reach a certain status in life, it becomes difficult to remain under the radar, but the truth remains that if you’ve got it and want to keep it, you better hide it. As tough as it may be not to brag about what you actually own on paper, there will come a very rainy day when you’ll be glad you hid your money -- you can bank on it.


The above is found on this link uk.askmen.com...



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by FreedomEntered
 




Deferred salary

Out-of-state LLC

Equity stripping assets
Living trusts

inconspicuous consumption


These are sooo not true in the US.

Deferred salary is still on the books of said company and taxes are paid on it.
Out-of-state LLC. Once again they have to report to the IRS.
Equity stripping assets. One calims a loss and the other claims a gain. All on the books.
Living trusts . Still reports to the IRS. Taxes are still paid.
Work abroad and partner with Uncle Sam. The $80K mentioned would taxed harder in the UK than the US.
inconspicuous consumption. 12 trillion buys a lot of big toys that you can't hide.



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by samkent
 


Actually alot of multi millionaires still do this to this day, and even OLD money people do this. So not sure what you mean when you say it cant be done, it is being done.



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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By can't be done I mean they can't 'hide'/'off the books' the money.
The OP was talking about 12 trillion that can't be accounted for.



posted on Jan, 31 2013 @ 03:48 AM
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reply to post by samkent
 


They can hide money off the books, I think after they attain a certain amount of wealth they are even encouraged to.By lawyers, accountants, bankers.
edit on 31-1-2013 by FreedomEntered because: (no reason given)





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