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Change is no longer accelerating, it is in fact slowing.

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posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by Bluesma
What I percieve is that the part of a society that is most rapidly changing, changes.

I mean, we change our focus on what we are nurturing and causing to grow and evolve.

A mall may not have changed much in that time, BUT
The buying and selling of products via the web has changed a LOT!

The growth evolved to a different form.

In 2006 I wasn't buying anything online- now I do my banking, my clothes shopping, christmas shopping, even grocery shopping online. I don't go to the mall anymore.

I also was noting how my brain seems to have changed since internet access (I am one of those old enough that half my life was before personal computers became generalized). I am so used to processing more information in each minute I get bored just watching a movie (even when I am enjoying the movie)- I need to open up other windows and researched various things at the same time. I am able to think and make connections and analyze things ten times faster now. It seems like life has sped up because my mind has sped up.

Just taking a walk outside, I rake in ten times more data consciously than I did ten years ago!

You might be looking in the wrong place to see the changes.......?



Yes, our life is becoming more dominated by the Internet. But in general, the overall 'feel' of 2013 is barely different at all from the mid 2000s and really only moderately different from the late 1990s.

I realize we didn't have smart phones and online shopping wasn't as popular ten years ago, but little felt different in 2003. The fashion, slang, and general way people acted and things looked was roughly the same, while 1993 and 2003 were very different.




posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by lampsalot
 


I think it may go deeper than this, I strongly suspect that time itself is the culprit here, and then. That is to say, not so much a socio decline in acceleration, as to a decline in the acceleration of time itself. From what I have been told, this could (I have no way of verifying this) be due to time "leaking" into other dimensions. This also has a lot of other implications, which impact directly on our reality. Time itself, obviously is non physical, however think of it more as the air upon which a feather might float. Our physical essence in this plane is the feather.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by December21st2012
reply to post by lampsalot
 


I think it may go deeper than this, I strongly suspect that time itself is the culprit here, and then. That is to say, not so much a socio decline in acceleration, as to a decline in the acceleration of time itself. From what I have been told, this could (I have no way of verifying this) be due to time "leaking" into other dimensions. This also has a lot of other implications, which impact directly on our reality. Time itself, obviously is non physical, however think of it more as the air upon which a feather might float. Our physical essence in this plane is the feather.


Hmmm interesting, where did you obtain this idea?



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by lampsalot
 


I believe that during deep meditation I have received visual communication from entities which inhabit other dimensions. Much of what I have gleaned, is of course a matter of interpretation. It seems though that if I correctly understand what they convey, then you may even find that at the sources of the leak, the exact opposite of the phenomenon which you describe is taking place. So in the locality, time/development will appear to be much swifter. Think of air rushing out into a vacuum, creating a fast flowing current.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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Hmmm. Well, I really can't say I'd mind a lull in the pace of change. I was always kind of old fashioned anyway.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 05:42 PM
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I don't know about this.. I see a lot of change... Ok think back to 2006...


People were just learning about these cool phones you could touch with your finger to do everything. Buttons? Ha buttons are going bye bye. It was just starting. When you saw someone with a touch phone you were amazed and wanted to touch theirs if you hadnt had one yet. Now 2013? You can buy a touch screen phone for 50 bucks with no cellphone plan or contract and pay as you go. Almost everyone with a phone has a touch smart phone.


Back in 2006, no one had video on demand like today. Sure if you had a good cable service you may get a few movies to play on demand. People only heard of this thing called netflix but it was more of a snail mail service with a very limited almost beta testing on demand streaming service. Nowadays, we have Netflix used primarily for streaming instantly now with over 100,000 titles at the touch of a button. Add to that amazon, hulu, vudu, crackle, blockbuster on demand, the use for a brick and mortar video store is almost non existent.


In 2006, flat screens were the wave of the future. You would go over to someone else's house to watch the game on this amazing thing called High definition. It became addictive. But it wasnt available everywhere. Some sporting events. And roughly 15% of the channels had it to offer. Blu Rays were fighting HDDVD for who would control the future in home video entertainment. Today? Almost every single person I know has a flatscreen in their home. Standard definition only applies if the channel they are watching doesnt offer it. Which is rare. From NBCHD to NatGeoHD, its everywhere. Blurays are just as cheap as DVD's now for older titles. I dont know many people who won DVD's anymore. Ive personally replaced all my dvd's with blurays. And now I have a 3d HD 1080p 65'' tv in my bedroom ( imagine what I have in my living room)

In 2006 my laptop had 250 mb of ram( or something like that). Today mine has a 1tb. I have a screen on my home computer I can touch now as well. Its an all in one. A tower? What the heck is a tower? Its a flat screen computer with all the gadgets in a tower now in the flatscreen. And the internet speed I had for my 2006 home? I was lucky to pull 1mbps. Today, I average with verified speedtest.net 25mbps. I was just able to download every episode of Homeland off my directv on demand service in a single night. In 2006, that would have taken me a week, and that is if the service was even offered, which it was not.


I could keep going...



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:37 AM
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reply to post by lampsalot
 



Well I think experience of time is largely subjective.

I don't know if I can put this into comprehensive linear language- it came from one of those "night lessons" I have, and my husband had the same lesson the same night (though the images that were used to illustrate what the narrator said were different and adapted to us each- like his showed cars travelling on parallel lines...
)

Time may go faster or slower for different people, depending upon the focus of their consciousness.

We are familiar with the phenomenon of people feeling time passing quicker as they age, or when they are "having fun"...... which we wave off as a meaningless false perception.
But when one becomes able to understand how to manipulate this experience of time purposefully, it has more implication!

Consider that "perception" and "experience", in this context, are pretty much the same thing- we aren't just talking about appearences outside, because the perceptor is interactive with the percieved.

For me, this particular time period has carried astounding changes. It sounds like you are talking about the US- I'll tell you that as an american living in a foriegn country, I am lost everytime I go home! I seems each time the culture is completely different, the technology, the living styles, the language for hecks sake!
Last time was one year ago, next will be this May, and I know I'll have to learn it all again....


The experience of time is highly related to your focus of attention to the details exterior to yourself.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 04:59 AM
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I totally agree with this and have been thinking of it on a "low level" for some time.

Reading your thread brought this home to me last night

Believe it or not I have never watched 24, so I sat down last night on Netflix and watched the first episode made in 2001 (11/12 years ago)- aside from the mobile phones, there was NOTHING in this programme that would have overly surprised me if this had been made last year, 2 years ago etc.

Now if I was to compare a programme from 2001 with 1989/90 I think the differences would be extremely significant and I would "know" these were different times



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 05:08 AM
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Lol tell this to the people going to ces on Tuesday.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 05:44 AM
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Originally posted by bknapple32
Lol tell this to the people going to ces on Tuesday.



why would that make my observation different?



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by Credenceskynyrd

Originally posted by bknapple32
Lol tell this to the people going to ces on Tuesday.



why would that make my observation different?



First off it was light hearted..

Second of all, because it is CES. The biggest unveiling of the next set of electronics. OLED tv, seen it? A TV as thin as 3 credit cards... Yes, get your wallet out, take a look at 3 credit cards back to back and thats how thick. Not so new, a camera that can take a picture while youre filming. See something picture worthy while youre filming? Tap the screen, boom picture. Wanna share it with your wife, take your phone and touch hers with it. She has it. Thats not even the tip of the iceburg.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 07:10 AM
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Another that comes to mind... Lenovo is coming out with a pc that is IN your table.

Nifty if you ask me. Compare that to a decade ago.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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yes, I know technology changes, I wouldn't deny that, I mean on a visual level this thread is something I wholeheartedly agree with- 24, the visuals, the "feel" if you will does not seem out of step with now, whereas looking at shows from 2001 compared with 1989 it feels much more of a distinctly different era



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 05:14 AM
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Originally posted by Credenceskynyrd
yes, I know technology changes, I wouldn't deny that, I mean on a visual level this thread is something I wholeheartedly agree with- 24, the visuals, the "feel" if you will does not seem out of step with now, whereas looking at shows from 2001 compared with 1989 it feels much more of a distinctly different era


That's exactly what I mean. Not only the look, but also the way people acted and such. I mean technology isn't everything even though nowadays (and back in 2001) people act like it is.

I was born in 1990. I'm 23, so it actually doesn't make me all that young anymore. I can't say from first hand experience how people acted in the late 80s/early 90s but even in the mid-late 1990s it seemed like life had a slightly different/slower pace to it.

But 2001 was pretty much the same styles and attitudes as 2013, I mean so what if the phones take pictures and are smaller, everything else is basically the same all the way down to the WTC still being a construction zone.

Some of the music and clothes in 2001 was a little bit different but overall anything back to about 1998 feels and looks like it could have been as recently as last year. But on the other hand in 1998, even 1990 seemed clearly like a different era from 'now'.
edit on 20-1-2013 by lampsalot because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 05:18 AM
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Originally posted by Credenceskynyrd
I totally agree with this and have been thinking of it on a "low level" for some time.

Reading your thread brought this home to me last night

Believe it or not I have never watched 24, so I sat down last night on Netflix and watched the first episode made in 2001 (11/12 years ago)- aside from the mobile phones, there was NOTHING in this programme that would have overly surprised me if this had been made last year, 2 years ago etc.

Now if I was to compare a programme from 2001 with 1989/90 I think the differences would be extremely significant and I would "know" these were different times


Yeah I remember my stepdad had my brother and I watch this movie, set in a camping trailer park or something and it had something to do with space. Not sure what it is called, but it came out in 1986. This was back in 2000 probably and it seemed utterly ancient to me.

This movie was only 13-14 years old at the time, which is kind of nothing really but it probably seemed basically as dated then as it does now that it's twice as old.

I can't imagine a movie from 1999 or 2000 seeming that ancient to a 10 year old kid today. I mean Johnny Tsunami and American Pie are dated, but they still don't seem of a completely different age. Kids still use a lot of the same slang they used in the late 90s, though I do think pre-2000 is finally starting to show its age.

I'm actually only just starting to think of movies from the 90s as '90s movies' as opposed to just 'movies' but the 80s-ness of that movie I mentioned probably would have been apparent even in 1989 lmao.
edit on 20-1-2013 by lampsalot because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 05:26 AM
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Originally posted by bknapple32
I don't know about this.. I see a lot of change... Ok think back to 2006...


People were just learning about these cool phones you could touch with your finger to do everything. Buttons? Ha buttons are going bye bye. It was just starting. When you saw someone with a touch phone you were amazed and wanted to touch theirs if you hadnt had one yet. Now 2013? You can buy a touch screen phone for 50 bucks with no cellphone plan or contract and pay as you go. Almost everyone with a phone has a touch smart phone.


Back in 2006, no one had video on demand like today. Sure if you had a good cable service you may get a few movies to play on demand. People only heard of this thing called netflix but it was more of a snail mail service with a very limited almost beta testing on demand streaming service. Nowadays, we have Netflix used primarily for streaming instantly now with over 100,000 titles at the touch of a button. Add to that amazon, hulu, vudu, crackle, blockbuster on demand, the use for a brick and mortar video store is almost non existent.


In 2006, flat screens were the wave of the future. You would go over to someone else's house to watch the game on this amazing thing called High definition. It became addictive. But it wasnt available everywhere. Some sporting events. And roughly 15% of the channels had it to offer. Blu Rays were fighting HDDVD for who would control the future in home video entertainment. Today? Almost every single person I know has a flatscreen in their home. Standard definition only applies if the channel they are watching doesnt offer it. Which is rare. From NBCHD to NatGeoHD, its everywhere. Blurays are just as cheap as DVD's now for older titles. I dont know many people who won DVD's anymore. Ive personally replaced all my dvd's with blurays. And now I have a 3d HD 1080p 65'' tv in my bedroom ( imagine what I have in my living room)

In 2006 my laptop had 250 mb of ram( or something like that). Today mine has a 1tb. I have a screen on my home computer I can touch now as well. Its an all in one. A tower? What the heck is a tower? Its a flat screen computer with all the gadgets in a tower now in the flatscreen. And the internet speed I had for my 2006 home? I was lucky to pull 1mbps. Today, I average with verified speedtest.net 25mbps. I was just able to download every episode of Homeland off my directv on demand service in a single night. In 2006, that would have taken me a week, and that is if the service was even offered, which it was not.


I could keep going...


Like I said, technology isn't everything. I see change more in terms of paradigm shifts (sorry to use the over-used, outdated term) rather than incremental developments of things such as technology.



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 06:14 AM
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reply to post by lampsalot
 


Nice! You found a pattern in the timeline.. I think you are definitely on to a solid theory here. If we continue to replicate on our selves without ANY concern for the place in which we live our destruction would most certainly be imminent. Leads one to ponder on the idea that a "Singularity " may actually be the realization of true self preservation with the release of humanity's EGO.
S&F !
edit on 1/20/2013 by DjembeJedi because: finish idea..



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 06:17 AM
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Originally posted by DjembeJedi
reply to post by lampsalot
 


Nice! You found a pattern in the timeline.. I think you are definitely on to a solid theory here. If we continue to replicate on our selves without ANY concern for the place in which we live our destruction would most certainly be imminent. Leads one to ponder on the idea that a "Singularity " may actually be the realization of true self preservation with the release of humanity's EGO.
S&F !
edit on 1/20/2013 by DjembeJedi because: finish idea..


What do you mean 'replicate on ourselves'? Are you referring to increasingly the human population?



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 07:12 AM
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This is an interesting thread, S&F. I needed some reading material and this hit the stop well.

I tend to agree with the op. Obviously the tech changes, its the atmosphere the feel of the the time he is referring to which as stated I agree with.

But if you wanna look at the tech the purpose of the tech still remains similar.

One poster bought up net flix and flat screens and hi def as changes in tech which he is correct however its purpose is the same as the tech from the earlier times. Color tvs were all the rage back in the day they made the experince more real.... hi-def. Vcrs allowed anyone to record thier favorite shows whenever... dvr. Want more entertainment for a premium cost buy cablel... netflix. Tvs have always been getting lighter and bigger. So it could be argued while the tech gets better the purposes dont.

I will throw out the cell phone tho as it has advanced so fast and can do so many things I think its the staple tech of this time period.



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by lampsalot

Originally posted by DjembeJedi
reply to post by lampsalot
 


Nice! You found a pattern in the timeline.. I think you are definitely on to a solid theory here. If we continue to replicate on our selves without ANY concern for the place in which we live our destruction would most certainly be imminent. Leads one to ponder on the idea that a "Singularity " may actually be the realization of true self preservation with the release of humanity's EGO.
S&F !
edit on 1/20/2013 by DjembeJedi because: finish idea..


What do you mean 'replicate on ourselves'? Are you referring to increasingly the human population?

Yes exponential population growth partnered with no self reliance advancement as a societal whole spells doom..





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