DARPA Developing Anti-Disinfo Bots

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posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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Surely something like this would mean that DARPA has it's hand in the pocket of Twitter, Facebook etc?

And I mean deep in their pocket.




posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Imagine what they could do if they could hijack your account and replace you with one of their "bots"




posted on Jun, 5 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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It only makes sense.. Until the Internet , MASS communications could be tightly controlled.

TV, paper,Radio for the most part provided one way communication where the publisher presented their controlled views. Even with Radio or tV live call ins or guest could be delayed and cut out when they didn't agree with their comments. Unlike the internet Ham Radio as far as I know never got to the masses as much as the internet.

With the internet people have been able to see opposing views and question things , but importantly harder for them to submit you to their thinking by bombarding you from both sides using their arguments to build their case.



posted on Jun, 5 2013 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Seems the CIA has found there way into this. Look what they just invested into.

www.chicagotribune.com...




Chicago-based Narrative Science, which specializes in artificial intelligence and communication technology, has received funding from an investment firm tied to the Central Intelligence Agency. The amount of the funding was not disclosed. Narrative Science said it will build a version of Quill, its flagship technology product, for In-Q-Tel's government customers. IQT, as the Arlington, Va.-based firm is known, is a private company that invests in and partners with startups on behalf of the U.S. intelligence community. Quill's artificial intelligence algorithms mine large sets of data for key facts and write natural sounding English prose based on the data. It can produce a range of formats, from Tweets to long-form business reports, and Narrative Science's customers include companies in industries such as financial services and marketing. The startup's technology "analyzes data and communicates this information in a way that is easy to read and understand," Steve Bowsher, managing partner at IQT, said in a statement. "We believe these advanced analytic capabilities can be of great value to our customers in the Intelligence Community." Narrative Science came out of Northwestern University, where computer science and journalism students created software to write automated recaps of baseball games. Stuart Frankel, a former DoubleClick executive who was an adviser to the Intelligent Information Laboratory at Northwestern, helped license the technology from the university to create the startup. He is now chief executive of Narrative Science while the students' advisers, professors Kris Hammond and Larry Birnbaum, are the company's chief technology officer and chief scientific adviser, respectively.





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