ITU members adopt the Y.2770 standard for global Deep Packet Inspection

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posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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Members of the United Nation’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU) have agreed to work towards implementing a standard for the Internet that would allow for eavesdropping on a worldwide scale.

At a conference in Dubai this week, the ITU members decided to adopt the Y.2770 standard for deep packet inspection, a top-secret proposal by way of China that will allow telecom companies across the world to more easily dig through data passed across the Web.

According to the UN, implementing deep-packet inspection, or DPI, on such a global scale will allow authorities to more easily detect the transferring and sharing of copyrighted materials and other protected files by finding a way for administrators to analyze the payload of online transmissions, not just the header data that is normally identified and interpreted.

(SOURCE)

Well it seems like the concerns expressed by Hefficide in this thread and this thread was not just a bunch of fear mongering after all. Honestly, I expected these concerns to be blown out of proportion, but boy was I wrong. Our worste fears are now becoming reality.

Typically, the process of deep packet inspection has been illegal because it is considered a violation of privacy. It's like me opening up your mail mid transit without your permission, and even without any legitimate reason. They can now easily see everything you do on the web and they don't need a good reason to look.


Tim Berners-Lee, a British computer scientist widely regarded as the ‘Father of the Internet,’ spoke out against proposed DPI implementation on such a grandiose scale during an address earlier this year at the World Wide Web Consortium.

"Somebody clamps a deep packet inspection thing on your cable which reads every packet and reassembles the web pages, cataloguing them against your name, address and telephone number either to be given to the government when they ask for it or to be sold to the highest bidder – that's a really serious breach of privacy,” he said.

This is absolutely disturbing stuff folks. People need to get up in arms about this. This cannot be accepted, this is a very crucial step towards total control and surveillance over the internet on a global scale. We need to take action before they can take this any further. I am simply blown away by this turn of events.
edit on 6/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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All I can say is...Encryption. It's not just for the nerdy types anymore.

Things like Proxies, Hush mail and Https:// are things we'll all likely start coming to know as automatically as the URL to this very website It'll be a shame because I can tell you, to be secure? You are basically rolling the clock back 10 years on internet speed for the overhead it brings on lag and ping times. Gaming is...well... You don't game securely. lol... Not even kinda with a weak method. Heck... When did China start being the place to look to for security ideas unless total control with total oppression is the goal?

Oh yeah... nvm...



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Yes that's true, but unfortunately a lot of websites do not support https. Furthermore, the Government (UK Government to be specific) has hinted at the fact they have direct access to decrypt any information secured with an official security certificate. Almost as if the certificate issuers were working with them, which I wouldn't doubt.

EDIT: I just wanted to add Hush Mail have been raided before, their service is far from secure.
edit on 6/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:44 PM
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Anonymous said to be planning cyberattack on ITU site

www.pcworld.com...




Anonymous is planning to launch a cyberattack this weekend against the website of the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations agency holding a meeting of 190 governments to discuss political and commercial control of the Internet, a security firm says.

The ITU-organized World Conference on International Telecommunications runs Dec. 3-14 in Dubai. The secretive meet has sparked rage within Anonymous and the blogosphere over a Russian proposal to hand control over the Internet to the ITU.

Such conspiracy theories are unlikely to become reality, experts say. That’s because such a move would require an international consensus, and many countries would oppose such a proposal, including the U.S.

Nevertheless, the hacktivist collective Anonymous posted a YouTube video last week denouncing the ITU meeting and warning of “grave consequences” to human rights.

On Wednesday, a small Anonymous group launched a denial of service (DoS) attack that took the ITU site offline temporarily, said Carl Herberger, vice president of Radware security solutions, which specializes in securing applications against cyberattacks.

“It’s very plausible they ran a reconnaissance run,” Herberger said.

While it’s possible the attack simply failed due to ITU defenses, Anonymous will often test the tools it will use before launching a full-blown distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, Herberger said.


Who is ITU? Are they not a part of the UN?

Is the UN really going to sell the information to identity thieves, or even to governments? I just don't see this happening...

not that i'm in support of Y.2770



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:45 PM
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Just to add a little, CNET has a little better article on this, at least it comes at it from a slightly different angle;
news.cnet.com...

It has a lot of links to .pdf and other reports which flesh this out a bit.

Another controversial section of Y.2770 is that it contemplates having network operators decrypt their customers' Internet traffic so it can be inspected.



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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Well. That... sucks. I mean one of the things people don't want to admit to is the things they look up online. I'm not gonna lie, I've been through my fair share of rabbit holes, and that day where you absolutely have to 'clear history' just to be safe. (don't have a dirty mind, I don't mean THAT) This is bad, really bad. Not bad like SOPA and PIPA because those were shot down pretty easy, but this isn't something you can just shoot down. And this is here to stay


Looks like it's time to beef up my Ubuntu distro.

edit on 6-12-2012 by mr10k because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by charles1952
It has a lot of links to .pdf and other reports which flesh this out a bit.

Another controversial section of Y.2770 is that it contemplates having network operators decrypt their customers' Internet traffic so it can be inspected.

Thanks for the link, and that part you quoted really concerns me. There's no way they can decrypt something unless they have the credentials required to decrypt the data. Otherwise they are talking about brute force, and we all know that is simply not practical at all. Therefore the mere fact that they think they could decrypt such data indicates they have access to the credentials required to decrypt it.
edit on 6/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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So... this thread has 1 flag after 45 minutes and a thread titled "Phobos declared ARTIFICIAL" posted just 35 minutes ago, with the source being an old article from beforeitsnews, already has 4 flags. This is why I'm getting sick and tired of ATS.
edit on 6/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 

If it makes ya feel better, I gave ya one of those flags.


As for the UK having the keys...I don't doubt that for some of it. After all, the UK is the third arm of the Echelon triad for operating global spying. They have been for decades. So what NSA has, the UK has. The NSA sure did drop all their whining about PGP almost overnight, didn't they? Funny on that... Almost like they were given a solution they could live with... Hmm... (They could at least make that stuff look a little mysterious...it's the obvious nature that I consider insulting. lol)

There are ways to be encrypted and secure...and I don't even claim to be that way 10% of the time. It's a pain in the butt, time consuming, headache full and generally feels like dial-up modem days before 56k came along to show people what HIGH speed was.


I think the authorities are confident that the vast majority will never do what it takes to have true privacy and then maintain the sacrifices for any length of time. I'm betting they're right too....sadly.



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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Well here your F and 4 star




posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



If it makes ya feel better, I gave ya one of those flags.

Haha, thanks. I was beginning to think all hope was lost. I don't care about getting flags really, what I care about is this story getting the exposure it deserves on ATS, and that can't happen unless it is flagged to the top. I just find it infuriating when stupid ridiculous things are flagged by complete idiots, whilst at the same time the truly important and far reaching stories are ignored and drift off into oblivion never to be seen again. We are supposed to be awake and alert on ATS, not docile fools... unfortunately I probably expect too much and my standards are probably much too high.


I think the authorities are confident that the vast majority will never do what it takes to have true privacy and then maintain the sacrifices for any length of time. I'm betting they're right too....sadly.

Yeah exactly, most people don't give a crap about securing their data transmissions, let alone have the knowledge to do it. Not to mention most people wont even be aware of developments like this, and will be completely oblivious to the fact the Government is performing deep packet inspection on their data transmissions.



posted on Dec, 6 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


You forget who "they" (DARPA) are. They are the ones who made the TCP/IP protocol. In the 70's. So it has to be thrown out there, "they" have had keys to encryption since then. Underground rows of servers don't just model nuke explosions.... A 64 bit processor has no problem cracking 32 bit code....Not that hard to make 128 bit processors that chew through 32 bit code. It is just printing the atoms on the chip the right way(lithography).

Flash forward a couple of years... 1024 bit processors. You know, the mill tech that is 30 years more advanced...
It's just not that hard. Sigint could tell what you were seeing on your VGA/TV tube just by the power output and the color output and frequency of the driver.. Sort of like comparing the shadows on the wall your tv casts to a known pattern (even through the window blinds). The same thing fake TVdoes but in reverse and to a more exact science.
There is a reason every computer system has a crystal diode that determines the signaling speed or the "language" that the circuit speaks. It acts like a fingerprint for that device that is used to decrypt what is used to talk on it. In effect it just makes it easier to grab the code and process it in a higher operation.

At least that is what was explained to me after from an old gov. friend after lots of liquid courage.


edit on 12/6/2012 by staple because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by staple
 


Regardless of how powerful their computers are, brute force cracking is simply not practical because the energy required is tremendous and it's a vast waste of time. Especially if they are going to try and decrypt large amounts of data collected from thousands of internet users. It's simply not feasible. And we know the encryption technology behind stuff like TSL/SSL is secure, because many technologies rely on those encryption schemes. If there was a backdoor to some of these important encryption schemes, many different systems would have already collapsed. Especially systems they don't like, like bitcoin. Therefore the only real conclusion one can reach with respect to security certificates, is that they are being supplied with the necessary credentials by the authorities who are supposed to be ensuring the security of those systems.
edit on 7/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 12:21 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


As of a few days ago 1.7% of the $250,000 stolen from bitcoin has been returned. Can you get your money?

"Many users have been asking about cash deposits. There are no new updates for cash deposits at this time. BitFloor is working on getting cash deposits at bank branches running again and will post updates as they are available."

Nope!
plus.google.com...


I'm on your side though.
edit on 12/7/2012 by staple because: (no reason given)
edit on 12/7/2012 by staple because: asdf



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by staple
 


That has nothing to do with the encryption technology behind bitcoin. The bitcoin network is still uncompromised because the encryption technology behind it is perfectly secure. If the encryption technology did have a back door, you can bet your bottom dollar the Government would have used it to take down the bitcoin network by now. But they haven't, and that was my point. Not to mention the countless other systems which rely on these same encryption schemes to protect data. If there was a backdoor into some of these popular encryption schemes we would know by now. It's as simple as that.



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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I don't think it would because of the reason you state. It would indeterminate the rest of the networks that rely on the trust that is assumed. If I cracked bitcoin or was involved with an agency that can crack common encryption protocols, You would not hear it from me. I rely on them not knowing what we know while they do their own thing. Sitting back being an observer has its merits. Tor was such a network. It was easily made into a collection point.



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by staple
 


We don't need to "hear it". We can plainly see it if it were to happen. The fact is we have no visible evidence that popular encryption schemes have ever been cracked by making use of a backdoor. The mathematical theory behind those encryption schemes haven't been proven faulty yet either. As far as all the evidence is concerned, there is no backdoor into the these popular encryption schemes. And if there were such evidence or indication, all the system which rely on these encryption schemes would come crashing down. Every time the Government gets a hold of an encrypted file they want to crack, they put their super computers to use and brute force it. They always take a considerable amount of time to crack the files, and that is solid proof they have no way of instantly cracking the files with a backdoor.
edit on 7/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 




This is absolutely disturbing stuff folks. People need to get up in arms about this. This cannot be accepted, this is a very crucial step towards total control and surveillance over the internet on a global scale. We need to take action before they can take this any further. I am simply blown away by this turn of events.


I would agree with you. But here's the problem with the UN: They're not elected. We can't toss 'em out; we (The People) have no representatives, per se; we have no lobby to work on our behalf. What do we do? Who do we speak to? This has been the danger of the UN all along.

Once upon a time they were young and weak and unorganized. But now---not so much....



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by Ex_CT2
 


Great point. The UN is now getting out of control, slowly morphing into a true one world government with the power to dictate absurd stuff like this and no one really has the power to oppose it. I'm sure there must be something we can do though.



posted on Dec, 7 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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This is troubling news indeed.

Already a major change to law and approach, just four days in. And there is a WEEK left for them to do even more damage.

~Heff





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