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DIY Arms: The Weapons Revolution Is Finally Here!

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posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 05:53 PM
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The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights that protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms. By implication we can also MAKE what we bear and what we keep. Now since modern technology is fast enabling the average person to make those arms in their own homes what is to keep the legally constituted militia from arming themselves completely and totally against the unjust oppressors? Will the government be soon pulling their hair out inventing new laws to suppress this technology? There are many things to consider here not the least of which is how the Bill of Rights is brought to bear on ALL levels in order to protect the rights of the American people to not only posess but to make things.



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The Printable Firearm Revolution is Closer Than You Think


Adan Salazar
Infowars.com
September 21, 2012
The right to bear arms is undeniably explicit in the constitution, but what about the right to produce your own arms? Cody WilsonThat question will inevitably come about following the semi-recent innovation of 3D printing, and a group’s announcement it wants to distribute plans allowing you to create firearms in your own home.
3D printing is exactly what it sounds like. You can literally “print” physical 3D objects by scanning whatever you want replicated. A 3D printer can work like a copier, but it can also interpret 3D CAD data files to create just about anything.

Earlier this week, an online fund-raising campaign created by University of Texas law student Cody Wilson and a group of friends reached its goal of collecting $20,000 to fund an operation known as the Wiki Weapon Project.

"Weaponry: This forum is dedicated to the discussion and examination of military weapons technology past, present, and future."

NOTE - Regarding the rules of this Forum - (see above) There is a caveat to the thread inasmuch as the making of the weapons referred to here are not "military" in the strict sense of the term, but by their very nature are "civilian" insofar as they would be made and used by ordinary citizens as weapons to be possibly used by a "militia" for example.

This is not to say that there isn't a military application to this technology though, and in fact, the military could very well take it over for their own purposes.

edit on 21-9-2012 by de_Genova because: text
extra DIV




posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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I don't see where new laws are even needed. Someone with a machine shop and quality equipment can already fabricate anything from a submachine gun to an M-2 Heavy Machine gun with what any good shop has laying around for raw material. Laws cover what happens to someone doing that too......ouch..

Why wouldn't the same laws that cover home manufactured weapons cover 3-D printing? Technology has changed but the process and end result hasn't, has it?



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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Printable fire arm will be the red hearing to regulate self manufacturing machines out of existence, mark my words, its not about guns, its about being able to print your own products at home with out paying intellectual property holders.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by benrl
Printable fire arm will be the red hearing to regulate self manufacturing machines out of existence, mark my words, its not about guns, its about being able to print your own products at home with out paying intellectual property holders.


I think you are not correct here. The intellectual property holder is the maker and/or the designer of said property/product/object.

Read the material - the weapons are unique designs made by individauls. These potential weapons are not to be understood as ripoffs nor are they copies.
edit on 21-9-2012 by de_Genova because: text



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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Originally posted by de_Genova

Originally posted by benrl
Printable fire arm will be the red hearing to regulate self manufacturing machines out of existence, mark my words, its not about guns, its about being able to print your own products at home with out paying intellectual property holders.


I think you are not correct here. The intellectual property holder is the maker and/or the designer of said property/product/object.

Read the material - the weapons are unique designs made by individauls. These potential weapons are not to be understood as ripoffs nor are they copies.
edit on 21-9-2012 by de_Genova because: text


You don't understand me, what i am saying is the "danger" of people printing guns will be the excuse to kill these machines, machines that have endless other uses, one of which is printing your own products.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Intellectual property has nothing to do with this topic. You can create and design anything you want anywhere anytime.
If you have an idea and want to take it to market, you can buy a $10,000 patent attorney to do a patent search, or pay someone to go into the Vault to do your own check.
www.uspto.gov...

It's totally irrelevant.
The question here is can you build a piece of equipment that will discharge a "spark" large enough to produce a trajectory item to move, or make an explosion that can cause damage, just because you can build the parts without using a gunsmith? 3d imaging has nothing to do with it. Lathes work just fine. 3d designing is an imagery formatted to get a real 3d prototype part. It will NOT give you a form fit and function like a real gun.

I believe there are already laws in place where there are regulations for anything to do with explosives of any type. Fireworks come to mind.

Let me know when you have the 3d drawings for a Smith and Wesson that can shoot live ammo. Could be interesting. Don't bank on it. Smith and Wesson WILL be all over you for intellectual property infingement not to mention Alcohol,Tobacco and Firearms Department.

Just sayin.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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One new saying
Don't Print A Gun Unless,
You Plan on Using IT!



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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This is going to be a nightmare for law enforcement.
Home made disposable guns, untraceable, probably all with the same ballistics signature.
Print a gun, shoot someone, leave the gun there. Print another one for the next victim.
What gangster wouldn't want that?

Imagine the issues raised in places, like the UK, where firearms are heavily limited.
When anyone can just push a button and get a gun, many firearm regulations will become unenforceable, if not totally obsolete.

When (not if) this hits the web, we'll be living in a totally different world.
Governments will be left with two choices. Erase all the gun control laws from the books, or ban 3d printers.
Sure, you can make your own gun now, with expensive tools and good skills, but this will make it so any idiot can make one in no time, with zero skills. So simple, a 6-year-old can do it, and probably will.

This is going to be an intersting issue, to say the least.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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They WILL Bann the Printers.
lets hope a freind will let us print a printer.

They (the people who sell us stuff we Dont need)
will do all they can to stop this.
or we will stop buying ever thing.

its just the Inks! that are the problem.
when we can make the Ink to.
we will be free!?

they will kill you before they let you be free.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by subject x
This is going to be a nightmare for law enforcement.
Home made disposable guns, untraceable, probably all with the same ballistics signature.
Print a gun, shoot someone, leave the gun there. Print another one for the next victim.
What gangster wouldn't want that?


We already have stolen guns that are disposable. 3D printers can produce plastic parts, usually acrylic, that aren't as strong as metal and are unsuitable for many parts of firearms. As to manufacture of untraceable guns, look up "zip gun."



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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You are all aware that you can print in metal too? Stainless steel, Brass, Bronze, Aluminium, Titanium......
It is essentially a form of laser sintering where layers of metal powder are built up, layer by layer, into the desired form/shape, a high power laser sinters the grains together, then move upto the next layer and the process continues..... check out i.materialise.com... - now i know they will not print firearms for you - simply showing the technology exists NOW and could be used in this way NOW.....

So, as such, you could print out EVERYTHING that you need, put it together, and have a working fully functional firearm.........
The only thing you cannot currently print is the chemicals that make up the explosive in the shell casing... but that wont be long either.......

Essentially, with the correct CAD files, you can make a fully functional metal firearm that will function exactly the same as a manufacturer fabricated one......

Could be a life saver to those of us unfortunate enough to be lumbered with laws stating we cannot have them.... Quite Frankly I WILL DECIDE what i can and cannot have and I WILL DECIDE how best to protect myself. I remove the burdon from the state. I DO NOT trust the state/government.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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I must be some anomaly in that I dont get what the big deal is over these plastic CNC mills.

Real CNC has been around as long as I've been alive and is inexpensive enough for the hobbyist.

You can make an AR-15 with a bench grinder and a drill press.

The fact that there seems to be some irrational fad popping up around these things is suspicious to me.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by benrl

Originally posted by de_Genova

Originally posted by benrl
Printable fire arm will be the red hearing to regulate self manufacturing machines out of existence, mark my words, its not about guns, its about being able to print your own products at home with out paying intellectual property holders.


I think you are not correct here. The intellectual property holder is the maker and/or the designer of said property/product/object.

Read the material - the weapons are unique designs made by individauls. These potential weapons are not to be understood as ripoffs nor are they copies.
edit on 21-9-2012 by de_Genova because: text


You don't understand me, what i am saying is the "danger" of people printing guns will be the excuse to kill these machines, machines that have endless other uses, one of which is printing your own products.


You can never get rid of all the printers.

Take a 3D printer to print parts for a bigger printer.

Then assemble and used that bigger printer to make parts for a much, much bigger printer.

After assembly, print a cannon or a tank and as many printers and guns as you want.




posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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Man makes guns with a 3D printer


www.slashgear.com

We’ve seen no shortage of 3D-printed masterpieces over the last several months, but this is reportedly the first time that someone has used the technology to create a firearm. It comes from a users on the AR15 message boards, a community for gun fanatics. He used a Stratasys 3D printer to create a .22 pistol. And yes, it actually works; it can shoot bullets just like a normal gun.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Thread already posted hereATS



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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This makes me want to scream! No weapon was produced! A lower receiver assembly was produced. That hardly qualifies as a weapon event the fascists at ATF don't define it as a weapon.


Originally posted by de_Genova
The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights that protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms. By implication we can also MAKE what we bear and what we keep. Now since modern technology is fast enabling the average person to make those arms in their own homes what is to keep the legally constituted militia from arming themselves completely and totally against the unjust oppressors? Will the government be soon pulling their hair out inventing new laws to suppress this technology? There are many things to consider here not the least of which is how the Bill of Rights is brought to bear on ALL levels in order to protect the rights of the American people to not only posess but to make things.



Article

This is a grass roots operation - they need you.

DONATE LINK HERE -


The Printable Firearm Revolution is Closer Than You Think


Adan Salazar
Infowars.com
September 21, 2012
The right to bear arms is undeniably explicit in the constitution, but what about the right to produce your own arms? Cody WilsonThat question will inevitably come about following the semi-recent innovation of 3D printing, and a group’s announcement it wants to distribute plans allowing you to create firearms in your own home.
3D printing is exactly what it sounds like. You can literally “print” physical 3D objects by scanning whatever you want replicated. A 3D printer can work like a copier, but it can also interpret 3D CAD data files to create just about anything.

Earlier this week, an online fund-raising campaign created by University of Texas law student Cody Wilson and a group of friends reached its goal of collecting $20,000 to fund an operation known as the Wiki Weapon Project.

"Weaponry: This forum is dedicated to the discussion and examination of military weapons technology past, present, and future."

NOTE - Regarding the rules of this Forum - (see above) There is a caveat to the thread inasmuch as the making of the weapons referred to here are not "military" in the strict sense of the term, but by their very nature are "civilian" insofar as they would be made and used by ordinary citizens as weapons to be possibly used by a "militia" for example.

This is not to say that there isn't a military application to this technology though, and in fact, the military could very well take it over for their own purposes.

edit on 21-9-2012 by de_Genova because: text
extra DIV



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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Of course The NYTimes is late to the party and goes straight for the kill:


After committing a crime with a printed weapon, a person could simply melt down the plastic and reprint it as something as mundane as a statue of Buddha. And guns made of plastic might not be spotted by metal detectors in airports, courthouses or other government facilities.


Source: bits.blogs.nytimes.com...

-Mags



posted on Oct, 12 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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I've seen this meme so many times now I'm beginning to wonder if some one isn't planting these stories.
Or worse people are so afraid of guns they don't even know how the things work.
"Yes Virginia the bullet comes out the end with a hole in it"

You can't print an entire Gun with a 3d printer.
What are you going to set the metal bullet off with? a plastic firing pin won't work.
What happens to the plastic barrel once a hot round goes down it?
How will the bolt and recoil mechanism work with plastic parts that don't slide against each other very well?

To make a gun you need metal parts. And if you can afford a 3D metal printer you can afford to go by a gun.
Heck you can buy the entire gun store since a metal 3d printer starts at around $500,000.
Hard to say since it's a case of "If you have to ask you can't afford it".

The most you can print with a 3d printer is the lower receiver.
Gun manufacturers have looked in to the idea of all plastic guns/Composite guns and it's never worked.
Every soldier in the world always wants a lighter weapon on a long road march.

The people that would need a printable gun are not smart enough to learn the tech to do it. And they will just go buy a real metal illegal gun anyway.

Plus printing a gun is not illegal pre se but you may get a visit from the BATF anyway if you don't have a federal firearms licence. Which in most cases cost more than a real gun.

I was joking about all of these stories about a 3d printable gun being planted as a meme.
After doing a little reading I'm wondering if it's true.
Seems the Undetectable Firearm act (H.R 2845, S.2180) is due for being renewed next year.

the people arguing for it can go back and say
"OMG they can print guns now! We have to renew it and add more provisions to it."
Makes you wonder sometimes.

just in case your wondering:
Undetectable Firearm act (H.R 2845, S.2180)
thomas.loc.gov...:HR04445:@@@L&summ2=m&


"SUMMARY AS OF:
10/21/1988--Senate agreed to House amendment with amendment. (There are 4 other summaries)
(Senate agreed to House amendment with an amendment)

Undetectable Firearms Act of 1988 - Amends the Federal criminal code to make it unlawful to manufacture, import, sell, ship, deliver, possess, transfer, or receive any firearm: (1) which is not as detectable as the Security Exemplar (after the removal of grips, stocks, and magazines) by walk-through metal detectors calibrated and operated to detect the Exemplar; or (2) of which any major component, when subjected to inspection by x-ray machines commonly used at airports, does not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the component.

Defines the term "Security Exemplar" to mean an object that is suitable for testing and calibrating metal detectors and is, during the 12-month period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act, constructed of 3.7 ounces of stainless steel in a shape resembling a handgun. Directs the Secretary of the Treasury, at the close of such 12-month period and at appropriate times thereafter, to promulgate regulations to permit the manufacture, importation, sale, shipment, delivery, possession, transfer, or receipt of firearms that are as detectable as a security exemplar which contains 3.7 ounces of stainless steel or such lesser amount as is detectable in view of advances in state-of-the-art developments in weapons detection technology.

States that no provision of this Act shall not apply to: (1) the manufacture, possession, transfer, receipt, shipment, or delivery of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer for the purpose of examining and testing such firearm to determine whether it would be prohibited by this Act; and (2) any firearm which has been certified by the Secretary of Defense or the Director of Central Intelligence as necessary for military or intelligence applications and is manufactured for and sold exclusively to military or intelligence agencies of the United States.

Permits the conditional importation of firearms for the purpose of examination and testing to determine whether the importation of such firearms will be allowed under this Act.

Provides an exemption from such prohibition for any firearm possessed in the United States before the enactment of this Act.

Provides criminal penalties for violations of this Act.

Prohibits the Secretary from authorizing the importation of undetectable firearms.

Directs the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct research to improve the effectiveness of airport security metal detectors and airport security x-ray systems.

Directs the Attorney General, the Secretary, and the Secretary of Transportation to conduct studies to identify available equipment capable of detecting the Security Exemplar while distinguishing innocuous metal objects.

Repeals such prohibition ten years after the effective date of this Act"



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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Why this guy is starting with a gun of all things I don't know. He says the object is to be able to share 3D printer files for free to the masses. Think of all the things this technology could make - tons of stuff. This could put companies out of business. All you have to have is the 3D printer and the raw resource materials and a 3D printer file and Poof - instant future way of life that could change everything we know today and threaten many peoples bank accounts.

The thing is this would need to be cheap enough to make it worth having. It would have to be a tool you use daily and for the rest of your life with minimal expense. Otherwise, going to the store will be much cheaper in the long run. I can't see that happening anytime in our lifetime. If the government controlled the raw materials for these things they could stop you from having your revolution.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


He has started from a niche that isn't already addressed, that's all.. everything you described is already being done by other projects and commercialized as well.

See Shapeways, Thingiverse, TinkerCAD, etc. for extensive examples. -Mags



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
I don't see where new laws are even needed. Someone with a machine shop and quality equipment can already fabricate anything from a submachine gun to an M-2 Heavy Machine gun with what any good shop has laying around for raw material. Laws cover what happens to someone doing that too......ouch..

Why wouldn't the same laws that cover home manufactured weapons cover 3-D printing? Technology has changed but the process and end result hasn't, has it?


Actually home manufactured machine guns etc. is perfectly legal to do. The ATF Arrested a man for doing just that he made a full auto AK I believe and the Court ruled that it was legal since he did not sell it. As long as it does not enter commerce they have no jurisdiction they use the commerce clause ( wrongfully) to grant themselves jurisdiction over weapons.

So we should start a free gift charity for weapons and make and give free weapons to anyone who wants one... Anyone want to donate to the cause?
edit on 13-10-2012 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)





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