Infrared "Scene Projection" Test over Tonopah Test Range

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posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 01:36 AM
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www.spiedigitallibrary.org/data/Conferences/SPIEP/7918/76630A_1.pdf

This is a rather technical paper that in part discusses a "threat simulator". On page two, it has some images of a missile test over the TTR in 2007. (No exact data given) A "scene" was projected in 2010. My interpretation of the imagery is the "grid" in the lower right comprises the runway and taxiways. It looks like the missile was launched over Mud Lake. The images were originally FOUO (for official use only), but the paper is cleared for unlimited release.

You can google Large Format Resistive-emitter Array (LFRA) for more information. There is plenty of open source information on the project, though it is technical. Basically the goal (again, my interpretation) is to generate a heat signature that looks like a missile launch rather than to launch a real missile. Looking at the test setup, I believe they can't project the missile in physical space, but rather just feed the infrared fake image directly to the lens of the camera.




posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by gariac
 

sorry, i don't understand. could you please explain in basic terms, what it does and what it is good for ?



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:22 AM
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Very interesting! Thank you for sharing..
Just counting the posts until a special that doesn't read or understand tries to link this somehow to "Project Bluebeam" though....



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:30 AM
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I think this is cool.

Eliminates collateral damage.

Thats what everyone wants.

But I dont know if insane dictators care about fake missles.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by Common Good
I think this is cool.

Eliminates collateral damage.

Thats what everyone wants.

But I dont know if insane dictators care about fake missles.

What if the target doesn't know it is fake? Wouldn't they 'see' a missile on it's way to them and counter-strike with a REAL one?



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by doobydoll
 


Yes- But you know America- Gotta please our enemies.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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I am not convinced this "projector" does any more than project right to the sensor in a lab. Now if it projected a missile in the sky, that would rank high on the coolness scale.

For a less scientific explanation of the device, you can view the sales literature here:
www.sbir.com...

In addition, they have some examples of projected images here:
www.sbir.com...

I was more interested in the missile test at the TTR rather than the device itself, not that the device isn't interesting. On the contrary, it is a 1024x1024 array of resistors that get stinking hot (700 deg K). Room temp in Kelvin is around 300 deg K. To put this in perspective, your typical silicon integrated circuit is designed to work up to 150 deg C, or 425 deg K. Thus they are not simulating something that is hot, but in reality the imaging array IS hot. It is hot on a pixel by pixel basis, with analog (linear) control, so it can create a thermal image. That is, it has shades of gray.

Back to the missile test at the TTR, the images in the PDF appear to be taken at some elevation, so they were not using the ground based camera system that the TTR is known for. This could be a night test, or they could have used a long pass filter over the sensor so that heat would be emphasized.

Many infrared sensors will respond to visible light as well. If the goal is to detect an intruder, you would most likely accept any light (visible or IR) that tickles the sensor. For scientific purposes, that is to detect something that is actually hot like the body of an aircraft or missile plume rather than an object reflecting light, you would filter the image with a long pass filter. Infrared wavelength is longer than, i.e. lower frequency, then visible light. The long pass filter would remove the visible spectrum and only pass infrared and lower wavelengths.

If you have a R72 filter, it looks black to the naked eye but a black and white CCD will see right through it since the CCD has sensitivity out to about 1 um. The R72 passes light from about 700nm to 3um.

Regarding hot surfaces, they follow the black body radiation formula, emitting a peaked curve with long tails for its spectrum. When you see a flame, you are only viewing a small portion of the light emitted, since most of it is infrared.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


There is so much we don't know. They just recently found out that you can see thorugh someones clothing in an IR camera if you remove the filters.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by beakeradams
 


Oh wow, I totally need these devices then. For specific female human species so to say haha. Must be something that penetrates the materials of which clothes are made. I thought this was only in the movies.





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