Curiosity Rover Takes Detailed Photos of Martian Rock Formation

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posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Agreed. My first thought was, 'that's a dry streambed'.




posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix

Originally posted by CaptainBeno
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Hahahaha
I "C" what you mean!

Just for you:



LOL Thanks. See.. or.. C - I knew these were faked! Mars is in a studio in Hollywood!

Seriously.. not to say these pics aren't great but I was hoping for something a little more scientifically challenging ( the real pics not your C pic) - something extraordinary about the rocks that would really give the folks at NASA pause to say there is something odd going on here, and we need to figure it out. There seems nothing extraordinary about these rocks, 'cept of course they are on mars. You get a star and flag not just for the rocks, but because you have a good since of humor.
edit on 19-9-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp

With all due respect
I think it's up to Geologists to decide if this rocky formation is scientifically challenging or not...
We (well most of us) don't know what to look for in a martian rock and therefore are "impressed" by other things (like shininess)
This boring pathetic rock is telling us many things about mars past and present, we have to educate ourselves in order to understand it, though.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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Finally, images like this what i want to see of the other world.

I don't care about aliens or anything, i just want to see images as much as possible, every singl eimage would impress me.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 03:41 PM
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The 360º interactive view is something else,

www.panoramas.dk...

I mentioned a few days ago, in another post that curiosity should try and crunch up a rock or two with its wheels just to see how loose the agregate is, some of it looks so fragile.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


I love that - thanks


It just blows me away, I could stare at that for hours and hours.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
I noticed that outcrop a couple of days ago in one of the thumbnails. The detail shows it's pretty clearly alluvial in nature.


You are right. Curiosi ty Rover Steps Right Into Ancient Riverbed On Mars



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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Originally posted by mark1167
reply to post by CaptainBeno
 


Wow. Rocks. What a find. I'm not sure the world is ready for such a discovery. Billions of dollars so we can get excited about pictures of rocks. What are we expecting to find up there besides rocks. Fossils? water? life?
When they claim to have found one of these things let me know.



No sense of wonder. I pity those who are too easily sarcastic and too hard nosed to see beauty.


It's an amazing feat being able to get there, and to send back images and scientific data is wonderful. It's only the beginning and already people are "meh, so what".

These are exciting times and for us to be able to gain more information about Mars is a great step.

This is what we should be celebrating, as humans, not nationhood or the world series (intentional lower case) or the kardashians.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by aorAki

Originally posted by mark1167
reply to post by CaptainBeno
 

Wow. Rocks. What a find. I'm not sure the world is ready for such a discovery. Billions of dollars so we can get excited about pictures of rocks. What are we expecting to find up there besides rocks. Fossils? water? life?
When they claim to have found one of these things let me know.

No sense of wonder. I pity those who are too easily sarcastic and too hard nosed to see beauty.

Well, they are pretty much just rocks. Aside from them being on another planet, they're pretty uninteresting, and it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll eventually lose interest in them at some point, too. How many people are still visiting the other rover sites? There are a lot of images of rocks on them, too, you know. I guess some people are just more excited about the mundane than others.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


And news just in...................(About those boring rocks on just another planet)

Curiosity Mars rover beams images of ancient streambed

www.bbc.co.uk...

edit on 27-9-2012 by CaptainBeno because: formatting issue!



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 


Woo Hoo...this is getting better and better. Fossils, I want to see fossils...where there is water, there is life.

Des



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Ooooo yes, forgot about that........where's there's water, there is LIFE!



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 




where's there's water, there is LIFE!

Well, a greatly improved chance for life at least.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:19 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by CaptainBeno
 




where's there's water, there is LIFE!

Well, a greatly improved chance for life at least.


Phage = "Cautious Optimism" ......sometimes........maybe..........

Or maybe it's more like: Phage = "Slightly Less Pessimism"




posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 

Actually I am quite open to the possibility that life once existed on Mars.
Less open to the possibility that it got much beyond the microbial stage.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

Actually I am quite open to the possibility that life once existed on Mars.
Less open to the possibility that it got much beyond the microbial stage.


With you on that. I hope it got that far and was fossilized.

If there ends up being fossils of something more complex, I'll be pleasantly surprised and very interested in it..

But of course, they need to find something first.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Don't forget, even microbial life on Earth can leave behind fossils visible to the naked eye -- at least colonies of microbial life can, in the form of Stromatolites

There was even NASA geologist (Matthew Golombeck) who -- before Curiosity got to Mars -- said out loud that "in his wildest dreams", he hoped that Curiosity would stumble upon a Martian version of a stromatolite. It should be noted that he stressed the fact that while he didn't consider it "likely", he thought it was still within the realm of possibility -- i.e., "in his wildest dreams".

edit on 9/27/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift


Well, they are pretty much just rocks. Aside from them being on another planet, they're pretty uninteresting, and it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll eventually lose interest in them at some point, too. How many people are still visiting the other rover sites? There are a lot of images of rocks on them, too, you know. I guess some people are just more excited about the mundane than others.


I see well rounded pebbles. That is something right there.
Yes, though, regarding the mundane,, some people are prey to the cult of celebrity and the dross and brain damage that comes with it.

Me, I won't lose interest in them, seeing as I'm a geologist...however, it is obvious that some people don't care, and that's fine. It makes me sad though, because each photo has exciting objects. Just because there aren't 'aliens' doesn't make it mundane.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


My first thought was, 'that's a dry streambed'.

On BBC News today:

Curiosity Rover Beams Pictures of Ancient Streambed





edit on 27/9/12 by Astyanax because:






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