New Monkey species discovered in remote Congo rainforest

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posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 11:56 AM
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In a massive, wildlife-rich, and largely unexplored rainforest of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), researchers have made an astounding discovery: a new monkey species, known to locals as the 'lesula'. The new primate, which is described in a paper in the open access PLoS ONE journal, was first noticed by scientist and explorer, John Hart, in 2007. John, along with his wife Terese, run the TL2 project, so named for its aim to create a park within three river systems: the Tshuapa, Lomami and the Lualaba (i.e. TL2), a region home to bonobos, okapi, forest elephants, Congo peacock, as well as the newly-described lesula.

"There are monkeys out there between the three rivers that no one recognizes. They are not in our field guides," Terese Hart wrote tantalizingly in a blog post in 2008. "We've sent photos to the most renown of African Primatologists. Result: a lot of raised eyebrows. And the more we find out the higher our eyebrows go."

One of these monkeys was the lesula (Cercopithecus lomamiensis). John Hart first came across the new species in June 2007 when he and a field team were shown a captive baby lesula, kept as a pet by the local school director's daughter in the remote village of Opala. The next step was locating the species in the wild.

more @ news.mongabay.com...




posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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Wow. That monkey looks very human like. More than other species.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by Picollo30
 


That's next in line to rule the planet once we Homo Sapiens kill each other for black liquid stuff from the ground.


Great find.
With all the News about man caused extinctions it's great to see a species we haven't screwed up yet.....

S & F



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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This was posted days ago with more images. You should also provide the image of the monkey from a further distance, it looks less human in other images.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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Incredible find. It is amazing that earth is still hiding species and not just insects. I am floored everytime I hear about a new mammal found. Our little blue marble still has a few secrets.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


It's the size of a house cat.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by FidelityMusic
 


Politicians have the brain the size of a peanut.....



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


That would make your brain over 100 times bigger yet you let them run your country.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by FidelityMusic
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


It's the size of a house cat.


i dont think size is what matters here but the importance of finding new amazing species unknown to mankind. Who knows what's lurking in those unexplored regions.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by Picollo30
 


What I said was in reply to a poster saying these monkeys were in line for taking over the world after we're gone. A house cat sized monkey wont be taking over anything.



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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The size of Science's head grows with every 'new discovery'...

Twice this article contradicts itself on who was the 'first' to discover this animal ...


Originally posted by Picollo30
a new monkey species, known to locals as the 'lesula'. The new primate, which is described in a paper in the open access PLoS ONE journal, was first noticed by scientist and explorer, John Hart, in 2007.



Originally posted by Picollo30
John Hart first came across the new species in June 2007 when he and a field team were shown a captive baby lesula, kept as a pet by the local school director's daughter in the remote village of Opala.


John Hart didn't 'discover' anything ... The people of the small villages throughout the Congo 'discovered' this primate long ago ...

They've named it, categorized it, and even domesticated it ...

It isn't until some 'Scientist' comes along that this primate 'officially' exists ... This is a HUGE problem with biology ...

Countless animals have been 'ignored' by science, while the local population not only knows of it's existence, but often times have domesticated, hunted, and even EATEN such species.

If these people tell you the animal is out there, it's out there.

two words .... Mokele-mbembe ...

Another Congolese animal not yet recognized by science because John Hart dosn't have a picture of it ...



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by OneEleven
 


If FSMEs could still applaud, I would totally do it to you right now.

Well. Said.




posted on Sep, 17 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by OneEleven
 


I could not have said it any better!!

Some sciences are just like that. Nothing is thought to exist until the 'top' or most 'renown' acknowledge it as such.

And if there is little interest in furthering knowledge in a specific field....? Why no such progress or "discoveries' are made. Yet this does not discount the possibilities or potentialities.
edit on 17-9-2012 by Goldcurrent because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by blackmetalmist
Wow. That monkey looks very human like. More than other species.


That was the first thing I thought.

I wonder if the connection is the closest yet ?



posted on Sep, 17 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 


Nope. Taxonomy is all wrong. The newly described species is in the family Cercopithecidae. We are in the family Hominidae.



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 01:36 AM
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How many secrets still holds a wildelife. It s a pity some of them may be still unknown.



posted on Sep, 19 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


They should turn man loose on the Aisian carp problem. We would have that cleared up along with the hunger problem in no time!





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