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"Encouraging signs" of shift in China - Dalai Lama

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posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:04 PM
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I just came across this and found it to be not only encouraging, but perhaps also a sign of perhaps, things going on behind the scenes which have been pointed out by folKs like Ben Fulford. I know that's not a popular name around here for most, but for some it is and thought I'd share. Regardless of Ben, one still has to have a glimmer of hope that good things are going on as well.

Snippet:



DHARAMSALA (Reuters) - There are encouraging signs that attitudes towards Tibet are shifting in China, the Dalai Lama said on Wednesday, adding that the exiled Tibetan leadership is ready for fresh talks on his homeland if there was a genuine change of heart in Beijing.


One more snippet:



"We don't know who is who ... everything is a state secret, so it is difficult to say," he said, but added that some officials in China now appeared to agree with intellectuals that a new approach to Tibet is needed.
"These are very, very encouraging signs," he said.


You can Read THE FULL STORY HERE
edit on 29/8/12 by onehuman because: (no reason given)

edit on 29/8/12 by onehuman because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

It would be wonderful to see China end its occupation of Tibet and allow that nation's people to live in full autonomy instead of under the pseudo-autonomous status they have now. However, while there might be encouraging signs I still feel that it will be a long process, if it ever happens at all. Traditionally, China is very reluctant to give up what it has taken.

True, the same can be said of many nations, but the reality is that China is not likely to simply relinquish its hold on that region. It is not only the political, strategic and economic ramifications that matter here, there is also the issue of the Chinese leaders maintaining "face". And that is a massive cnundrum to resolve: even if they wished to proceed with a withdrawal and eventual restoration of full freedoms to Tibet, how to do it without looking like they have somehow lost out -- and thereby lost face?

As I see it that is the biggest difficulty to overcome.

Regards,

Mike

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.

edit on 29/8/12 by JustMike because: typo



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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The Dalai Lama is a propaganda puppet of the West. He should shut the hell up. What an obnoxious old fool.


In October 1998, the Dalai Lama's administration acknowledged that it received $1.7 million a year in the 1960s from the U.S. government through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and also trained a resistance movement in Colorado.[89] When asked by CIA officer John Kenneth Knaus in 1995 whether the organisation did a good or bad thing in providing its support, the Dalai Lama replied that though it helped the morale of those resisting the Chinese, "thousands of lives were lost in the resistance" and further, that "the U.S. Government had involved itself in his country's affairs not to help Tibet but only as a Cold War tactic to challenge the Chinese."

en.wikipedia.org...

Free Tibet! Buy a Beatie Boys cd!
Bosh.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Thank you JustMike, I have always respected your opinion and frankly Im tickled you responded. Of course I concur with you. China is a master at "saving face" or certainly not "losing face."

I have to say I just found myself sitting here thinking though from a different corner about the subject of a ufo base in the mountains between the two countries that has come up recently. Would something like that make two nations feel the need to stand a little more closely together? Better a united front? lol, my mind is just pondering....



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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China will want to keep tibet because it has the himalayas. the whole reason they went in their in the first place was because US and British spies were using the mountains to set up observation posts and sensors to observe chinese nuclear testing at the time.

To the chinese tibet is like israels golan hights or area 51's tikaboo peak or freedom ridge. They want control over it so that it an't be used against them.

Also in the ming dynasty tibetan warriors were hired by the chinese emperor to burn buddhist temples in china, where underground resistance to then corrupt Ming was developing. Many in china see tibet's latest misfortunes as karmic retribution.

The tibetians were very backwards people even a little savage before india and china imparted their culture onto them.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

reply to post by onehuman
 

Thanks for your comments. I'm glad to contribute where I feel able.


Well, if you have read some of the works by T.Lobsang Rampa about Tibet and especially what he reported about certain objects and devices hidden in some of the caves in the Himalayas, one has to wonder what may be known by the Chinese authorities in that regard.

There are rare situations when "face" would have to take a back seat (so to speak) and the scenario you have mused over might well be one of them if the above aspect comes into play.

Mike

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

reply to post by BASSPLYR
 

Those are some useful perspectives to add to the discussion and I'm sure we appreciate you raising them.


True, taking control of that part of the Himalayas certainly has strategic value to the Chinese and in fact, back in the days when there were not dozens of sky satellites orbiting the earth, it was even more so. But now? Yes, there is still a strategic benefit (and alluded to this in my first reply here), but perhaps it has waned to some degree.

This could be a factor in the decision making process as things go forward.

As for the historical angle, if we go back far enough, it's quite true that the Tibetans were rather backward and even savage when compared to the Chinese at around the same era. They lived (and still live) in a very harsh environment and that doubtless affected their social development. The knowledge that came to them certainly had a modifying effect.

In respect of karma, however, I'm not sure if an entire nation should or does suffer karmic consequences for the actions of some of its people in the past. But please don't misunderstand me on that point: I am literally not sure. Even if it is so, then in that case the ongoing karmic cycle in China's own actions would have to be considered as well.

It all gets very complicated, so I am glad I am not the one who has to try and work it all out!


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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I think they are doing this for spiritual tourism worldwide. There is big money in saving Tibet and supporting the Dali Lama.




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