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Sol 3's images just in. All in glorious colour!

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posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by FermiFlux
 


The data will be received over time, so you are looking at a couple of hours for the high resolution shots to be compiled.




posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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Originally posted by AmatuerSkyWatcher
Acid. Water. Oxygen. Lots
.
edit on 10-8-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)


They key is 0xygen

This is going to change everything you know



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by DjangoPhat
 


It's funny, when you do a google search on those pictures, the top one gets best guess of the Wadi Sahara and the bottom picture gets one best guess in the Sudan Desert. How ironic would it be if the Curiosity landed on some far away desert... of Africa...



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



Won't they have some real travel distance to get to something more interesting than the field of endless loose stones?
Lol, I was thinking the exact same thing. 98% of the images are just close-up pictures of dirt... I'm not getting that "wow" factor the OP claims. Give us some real eye candy NASA... this is boring crap.
edit on 10/8/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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US$2.5billion for these pics....we better enjoy and post these babies everywhere...Ooooo yes they so cool...I want posters!!!!



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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reply to post by FermiFlux
 

Those are pics of Sahara and Sudane deserts, I haven't got a clue why he posted it here.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:45 AM
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New images, remember me Viking Lander 1 (1976)



.... and Viking Lander 2 (1976):




edit on 10-8-2012 by theitalian because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by magma
 


Yes, it's astonishing. I have to hand it to the MRO team for their hard work over the last few years. Without their expertise, the finding of this site would have been like finding a needle in a haystack.

I can't wait for the analysis of the chalky/white rock uncovered by the boosters. Would I be jumping the gun by saying calcium sulfate?



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by th3onetruth
 


Lol, what took you so long.

Just goes to show how easy it is to fool people with this stuff.

Star for being critical and perceptive.

Sorry for the trick.




posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:47 AM
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Here's a large one





posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:48 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 



Won't they have some real travel distance to get to something more interesting than the field of endless loose stones?
Lol, I was thinking the exact same thing. 98% of the images are just close-up pictures of dirt... I'm not getting that "wow" factor the OP claims. Give us some real eye candy NASA... this is boring crap.
edit on 10/8/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)

If you look really hard there is abit coin in the distance

Dam nasa



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:53 AM
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reply to post by DjangoPhat
 


Well I never really believed that we got there. I like how the Curiosity images and news comes out with Holmes big trail also. Diverting attention away from that flub up is a good idea, the people are starting to ask questions. So it seems that the best way to distract the mass is to throw something shiny, e.g. Curiosity.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:53 AM
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reply to post by DjangoPhat
 



edit on 10-8-2012 by th3onetruth because: double post



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Do People realize that this is a science expedition and not some tourism/lets visit the aliens houses over there expedition?The rocks the dirt,well those are the reason Curiosity is there...
And yes WOWWWW(damn rright im yelling) is the word.Kudos to NASA.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by th3onetruth
 


That really doesn't make sense on different levels.

One is that the Curiousity project was obviously started way before the Colorado shooting.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
reply to post by AmatuerSkyWatcher
 


Err... they went millions of miles to land their Buck Rogers rover..in Barstow? lol....

Seriously, was this where they meant to land? I understand safety in not wanting to hit anything..but it looks so barren? Won't they have some real travel distance to get to something more interesting than the field of endless loose stones?

I'm sure they planned all this out...but that is why I ask, is this actually the target landing zone? Thanks anyone who can help.


There is a very good chance Gale Crater (the landing site) is an ancient lake bed. NASA landed there because it shows several signs of once being a very wet place.

Perhaps some of that lakebed (the crater floor) has been covered by dust over time, but there are higher areas around nearby Mt. Sharp that have exposed rock strata -- strata which may have been formed from sediment laid down by the lake that was once there.

So Gale Crater was picked by NASA for its geology and because it looks like a place that could have been suitable for the formation of life.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by th3onetruth
reply to post by DjangoPhat
 


Well I never really believed that we got there. I like how the Curiosity images and news comes out with Holmes big trail also. Diverting attention away from that flub up is a good idea, the people are starting to ask questions. So it seems that the best way to distract the mass is to throw something shiny, e.g. Curiosity.




Yet Curiosity was in his way to Mars with this all planned before Holmes shot anyone...Can we go back to wowwwing the pics and guessing what composition these rocks have?



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Not to mention the formation of the Mountain itself. Highly likely it was formed by volcanic activity, given it's isolation and shape.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by AmatuerSkyWatcher
reply to post by magma
 


Yes, it's astonishing. I have to hand it to the MRO team for their hard work over the last few years. Without their expertise, the finding of this site would have been like finding a needle in a haystack.

I can't wait for the analysis of the chalky/white rock uncovered by the boosters. Would I be jumping the gun by saying calcium sulfate?


They are looking for two things

Signs of life and economic viability

Amazing engineering and physics to make this happen

Correct me but calcium sulphate would need to be in underground deposits due to weathering and unlikely to be visible unless recent disturbance of well covered regolith has occurred.

- am more leaning towards common iron enriched quartz remnants

Think... Redox Buffer Fe+sio2+O2



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
Here's a large one




There are even larger versions of those images still in the spacecraft that have not been downloaded yet.

This lower-res version is a mosaic made up of 130 smaller images that tool 90 minutes to download from curiosity. The higher-resolution version will take even longer to download, and that download is on hold until Curiosity goes through a planned software upgrade.

The reason for the software upgrade is that the software right now is optimized for landing procedures. They need to change that software so it is optimized for its roving mission. I think the larger version of this mosaic panorama is coming tomorrow.




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