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Received a Letter From Golden Eye International? Help is at Hand

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posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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Received a Letter From Golden Eye International? Help is at Hand


torrentfreak.com


Any minute now a company called Golden Eye International (GEIL) will start sending out letters to users of the UK ISP O2.

These letters will accuse the person who pays the bill on the O2 Internet account of downloading and sharing various adult movies produced by UK porn outfit Ben Dover.

The idea behind the letters is simple: to get the account holder to admit to copyright infringement and force them to pay a cash settlement . . .
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.igotagoldeneyeinternationalletter.org.uk




posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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I assume noone surfs the net for porn...yeah right, but in the event you or someone living within the u.k. has such an issue then your not alone.

Whats interesting is if someone has hacked a wifi network and downloaded gigs of movies how is the rightful owner going to protest and be found innocent or on the hand, they can simply say that my wifi must have been hacked. Either way, its a nifty niche to earn some hard cold cash from frightened end users.

torrentfreak.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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The response or should i say the Golden Eye's view on the matter can be read here.


Golden Eye International, the holder of numerous film copyrights, has long taken the stance that the unlawful distribution of copyright material is detrimental to the film and creative industries. The continued use of peer-to-peer file sharing networks has grown to such proportions that we are left with no other alternative but to pursue those who infringe our copyrights and to seek financial retribution, for our losses, through their unlawful activities. While every attempt will be made to seek a settlement out of court we will not hesitate to enter into court proceeding with those who fail to acknowledge our intellectual property rights.


Ill have another cuppa thanks love..!



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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Yet more legal trolling by another outfit that buys the rights to films just to execute the scam.

You would think they'd have learned their lesson by now... that crap didn't work in America... unless your legal system is worse than ours, it won't work there either.

Good luck to you all. And remember... accusations are not evidence of anything. Ask for proof.
edit on 9-8-2012 by Maxmars because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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...and if they can't give you it, send them a pack of dog turds...

These people are scum of the Earth.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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I wonder if the U.S or other countries will follow suit?

You are right on with the WiFi hacking.
What choice would you have? It's your word against theirs.
Hardly seems fair.
In court you would have to be able to prove you got hacked.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by azureskys
 


Shouldnt they have to prove that you did not get hacked? I thought the burden of proof was on the accuser. Who knows anymore.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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What I find interesting (and also a little disturbing) is a quote from the linked site in the OP:



The letter you've received is part of a scheme known colloquially as 'speculative invoicing'.


If a private citizen were to send out letters under this so-called "speculative invoicing" scheme we would be explaining our actions to a judge in no short order.

I know what I would do if I received one, same thing I do with the monthly letter I get from TV Licensing telling me I am a bad man... straight in the bin.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by azureskys
I wonder if the U.S or other countries will follow suit?

You are right on with the WiFi hacking.
What choice would you have? It's your word against theirs.
Hardly seems fair.
In court you would have to be able to prove you got hacked.


In court and if no legal actions were taken upon the exhibition, one could easily show a judge how a wifi network is hacked regardless of the encryption used to lock it down. The demonstration would only require a no sweat 20min time frame at the most, on earlier encyption the time needed ranges between 15 seconds to 4mins maximum and add to this the function that almost all smart phones are wifi enabled does actually place that cherry on the cake.

happy packet gathering.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by azureskys
I wonder if the U.S or other countries will follow suit?

You are right on with the WiFi hacking.
What choice would you have? It's your word against theirs.
Hardly seems fair.
In court you would have to be able to prove you got hacked.



Originally posted by azureskys
I wonder if the U.S or other countries will follow suit?

You are right on with the WiFi hacking.
What choice would you have? It's your word against theirs.
Hardly seems fair.
In court you would have to be able to prove you got hacked.


In court and if no legal actions were taken upon the exhibition, one could easily show a judge how a wifi network is hacked regardless of the encryption used to lock it down. The demonstration would only require a no sweat 20min time frame at the most, on earlier encryption the time needed ranges between 15 seconds to 4mins maximum and add to this the function that almost all smart phones are wifi enabled does actually place that cherry on the cake.

happy packet gathering.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by eazyriderl_l
reply to post by azureskys
 


Shouldnt they have to prove that you did not get hacked? I thought the burden of proof was on the accuser. Who knows anymore.


That is correct, but its far easier to show them how fast and efficient a system is open with a wifi enabled router thus anyone making claims to " you downloaded xxx movies " is as futile as any argument can be. But this would also require a sharp lawyer as the older generation are simply V.1.0 and the new generation have been patched to V.4.2.3



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 06:26 AM
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Even if only a tiny percent of the people they try to scam this way actualy pay up, they will probably make a hefty profit. Like spam, the overhead for this kind of sleazy operation must be very low. And, if you will pardon the unfortunate yet oddly a propos analogy, like sperm, for every one that hits the target many, many more can go nowhere and the desired outcome can still be achieved. What a racket...



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 07:25 AM
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My wi-fi is open for anyone to use as they please. I'd love to get me some of these letters.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 08:22 AM
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There was another company that tried this same scam. ACS:Law.

The owner of ACS:Law, a one Mr. Andrew Crossley, is currently suspended from practising law, directly or indirectly. He is also suspended on being on the managment of any company that practices law.

His own company ACS:Law, was closed down by the courts, and he was made bankrupt by the huge fine he got served for the scam. They said he was basically knowingly mis-representing the law, in order to scare people into paying up. He got slapped down, hard.

True, it took the combined effots of ISP's, the BBC, and private citizens, and a loooong time, to persuade the courts to open a formal investigation into him and his practices, but when they did, the courts came down on him like a tonne of bricks.

Wikipedia page on ACS:Law

I see this new company going much the same way. They will make a large profit, for a long time, until the courts are persuaded to investigate them (British courts move slower than a fossilized snail), and a lot of people will be conned in to paying up. Eventually (reliastically, this may take years), the courts will take notice, and come down on them like a tonne of bricks.

They know this, and they are gambling that the profit they make before they get slapped down will offset the inconvenience of being slapped down.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 08:34 AM
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The real question is; who does this Simon James Honey aka Ben Dover aka Golden Eye know? He surely knows somebody high up in the legal system, anyone else found guilty of this sort of blackmail would be imprisoned.



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