6 strikes rule has taken effect today

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posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 11:43 PM
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The RIAA and MPAA has made a backdoor agreement to shut down anyone breaking copyright in the U.S. According to the measure the first four times someone is caught breaking copyright they will have their bandwidth throttled, and websites they can visit filtered. This would continue until the person paid $35.00 for "educational material". After that, they could could face permanent unplugging from the Internet, and face being sued by the RIAA and MPAA afterwards. According to the contract, the ISP's are obligated to hand over your personal data so you can be sued.




Last summer major ISPs including Comcast, AT&T, Verizon and Cablevision signed off on a new plan by the RIAA and MPAA taking aim at copyright infringers on their networks. According to the plan, after four warnings ISPs are to begin taking "mitigation measures," which range from throttling a user connection to filtering access to websites until users acknowledge receipt of "educational material." As you might expect, that educational material's chapter on fair use rights likely won't exist. The plan, as with most plans of this type, was hashed out privately with the government's help -- but with no consumer or independent expert insight. As a result groups like the EFF say the plan has massive problems, like relying on the IP address as proof of guilt, placing the burden of proof on the consumer, while forcing users to pay a $35 fee if they'd like to try and protest their innocence.

www.dslreports.com...

This is upsetting, because the ISP's have circumvented the courts in punishing infringers. This is automatic guilt according to your IP address alone. No judge, nor jury needed to find you guilty and have you fined and punished.

Another question is what will be considered copyright infringement to them? Will a negative movie review on a blog that uses a photo bring down the wrath of the MPAA. Will a music snippet from a YouTube video be considered a slap on the hand. It just sounds to me like the wolves are now going to be guarding the hen house.

Further Reading:
www.dslreports.com...
www.eff.org...
news.cnet.com...
torrentfreak.com...

Off topic: Yay my first thread!




posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 11:57 PM
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I recently got a few messages from Comcast warning that I may be infringing on copyrighted material and was subject to termination. I am now very cautious of what I download because I certainly do not want to be made an example of with this new agreement.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by othwald
 


ruh roh! no more free porn...

But if the porn sites continue to run unabated (pun intended) then there must be some kind of conspiracy.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by premierepastimes
 


Best thing for you to do is to look into getting a VPN for secure browsing. I hang out on another board of Blackhatters (if you want to know the in and out's of something you go there), and their talking about getting VPS's so they don't have to worry about this. I tend to agree with that solution. More people should invest in one, so they don't become the "example."

If your looking for one I know where you can get a good one cheap.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by othwald
 


It's not really secure from the IP though is it? I was under the impression that the IP can track a user without exception.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:15 AM
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I have an open wi-fi so anyone in range can do as they please. I'm glad I dont live in US. Internet access is a human right here.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by premierepastimes
 


Anyone who thinks that they can sit in their own house or any location that they frequent regularly and do things on the Internet anonymously is a fool.

You can hijack your neighbor's wifi and depending on what you do TPTB have the resources to track you down. It all depends upon how much effort it is worth to track you down. So you buy a service from some company in a foreign country. I would be suspicious about the intel ties of that service. AT the very least its ties to organized crime. And last but not least Uncle Sham has deep pockets and limitless political pull to apply pressure to those foreign interests. Bottom line is that it is not likely that you will obtain anonymity unless you are a .0001%-er or a sovereign state. Even then you better watch you back.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by premierepastimes
 


A VPN is very secure, and it is extremly unlikely ISP's will even go near it.



VPNs provide security through tunneling protocols and security procedures [1] such as encryption. For example, a VPN could be used to securely connect the branch offices of an organization to a head office network through the public Internet. A VPN can also be used to interconnect two similar-type networks over a dissimilar middle network for example, two IPv6 networks over an IPv4 network.

en.wikipedia.org...

Since they would be afraid of intercepting business related data that could get them charged with industrial spying they will not go near them. Also, they will be too busy focusing on the easy targets to make examples of them.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:23 AM
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Originally posted by PsykoOps
I have an open wi-fi so anyone in range can do as they please. I'm glad I dont live in US. Internet access is a human right here.


With rights come responsibilities. It is irresponsible and just plain stupid to run open wifi.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by othwald
 


With all due respect you are not correct. I have worked on federal cases that obtained warrnts to force ISPs to turn over data. It does not matter if you have a VPN or not. If you do something illegal you will be tracked down and legal pressure will be placed upon every ISP in the chain to track you down.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:29 AM
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Originally posted by Numbers33four
reply to post by premierepastimes
 


So you buy a service from some company in a foreign country. I would be suspicious about the intel ties of that service.


I would be too! There is only two services from foreign companies I would ever buy from when it comes to web hosting; and the only way I would connect to them is through a private proxy. That is if I had something that needed to go out on the Internet that was too sensitive. By sensitive I mean UFO proof or something else in that league, nothing illegal. Since these two web hosting companies have a reputation to keep nothing illegal is ever there.

A lot of web hosting companies have VPN available that you can buy right in this country. Uncle Sam does have deep pockets, but if your downloading music files I don't think they are going to move mountains to get you. Staying under the radar, not doing anything stupid while covering your tracks is the best way to go IMHO.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by othwald
 


Famous last words. Watch out for the honepots. They do not have to move mountains. It is very easy to catch people doing what you are saying to do.

At the very least it will be aggregated at the ISP level and that is who they will penalize. The ISPs will then take action. At any rate it eventually works its way down to the individual.

Best to just stop playing rebel without a job and just pay for music.
edit on 1-7-2012 by Numbers33four because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:34 AM
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Originally posted by Numbers33four
reply to post by othwald
 


With all due respect you are not correct. I have worked on federal cases that obtained warrnts to force ISPs to turn over data. It does not matter if you have a VPN or not. If you do something illegal you will be tracked down and legal pressure will be placed upon every ISP in the chain to track you down.


Agreed! They will move mountains to get their man. I will never mess with the long arm of the law, and I have no doubt what your saying is the truth. However, I'm more concerned with ISP's handing over my data to RIAA and the MPAA. I respect the laws according to my government, I don't trust these new rules that have been made to circumvent the courts.

The Government has the resources to bring down anyone. I doubt a ISP will want to waste money and man hours tracking down someone downloading something.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by Numbers33four
 


I know about the honey pots, and how dangerous they are. No one should be using a proxy they get over the Internet, especially a free one. I'm saying that for me a personal solution would be to getting a VPN. Like I said before stay under the radar, don't start downloading like crazy acting like a fool, and cover your tracks at all times possible.

I rarely download stuff, but when I do it's not cracked programs, music, and certainly not movies. To be safe on what I download (Computer programming manuals) I use a VPN. Now Uncle Sam may get me one day, but I highly doubt it.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by Numbers33four

Originally posted by PsykoOps
I have an open wi-fi so anyone in range can do as they please. I'm glad I dont live in US. Internet access is a human right here.


With rights come responsibilities. It is irresponsible and just plain stupid to run open wifi.


That's the kind of bs. they spewed back in the stone age. It's the way of the future here.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 03:35 AM
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Best not to do anything to draw attention to one's self. Even if "all" you are doing is sharing music how does law enforcement know that? Terrorists and pedos use encrypted channels. Why draw that kind of scrutiny? I would not count on a blind eye being turned when they only find music. And with the NAZIfication that is going on with the music industry it wouldn't surprise me if sharing music became a worse crime than the other two mention previously.

Just playing devil's advocate.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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Originally posted by PsykoOps

Originally posted by Numbers33four

Originally posted by PsykoOps
I have an open wi-fi so anyone in range can do as they please. I'm glad I dont live in US. Internet access is a human right here.


With rights come responsibilities. It is irresponsible and just plain stupid to run open wifi.


That's the kind of bs. they spewed back in the stone age. It's the way of the future here.


What? Are you trying to live out Idiocracy? Mkay, scro.





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